All posts by CHOC Children's

CHOC at Mission Nurse Reflects on Years of Service to the Community

One of the best parts of Susan Patcha’s job as a CHOC Children’s at Mission Hospital nurse is watching parents leave the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) with their healthy new baby.

“What keeps me here is the smile on a parent’s face as they hold their baby for the first time,” she says. “This overwhelming joy is magnified when they unite as a family on discharge day and enter the world grinning ear-to-ear.”

CHOC Children’s is grinning this month too as CHOC Mission celebrates its 25th anniversary. Opened in 1993, the children’s hospital operates on the fifth floor of Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo. The 54-bed facility is the only dedicated facility for pediatrics in south Orange County, surrounding coastal areas and north San Diego County.

CHOC Mission’s stellar reputation made joining the CHOC Children’s health system an easy decision for Susan in 1999.

“I felt right at home in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), and felt warmly welcomed as a part of the team,” she says. “Working with babies is the best job in the world. Working with their parents and families makes it the most rewarding job.”

Susan’s connection to CHOC Mission deepened 13 years ago. After a high-risk pregnancy requiring months of bed rest, her twins were born about five weeks early and spent eight days receiving care in the NICU at CHOC Mission.

“I felt relieved that they would be taken care of by my friends in my hospital,” she says.

choc-at-mission-nurse-with-kids
Susan today with her twins, who were cared for in the NICU at CHOC at Mission.

When she returned to work after maternity leave, Susan had a keener understanding of what her patients’ mothers were feeling and she incorporated that knowledge into her care of the entire family.

“I realized before I had no idea what these women go through and how sad it is to be separated from your child,” she says. “I tried to share a little bit of my story, so they would know that I understood and was going to help them through it, and that their baby would be OK. I think it helped me be a better nurse to go through the whole experience.”

Today, Susan wears several hats at CHOC Mission. Not only is she the discharge coordinator in the NICU, but she also provides direct patient care there and she’s the lead lactation consultant.

A desire to help is among the forces that pushed Susan toward a career in nursing. Already from a family of nurses, Susan was greatly impressed by the team that cared for her father when he suffered a heart attack decades ago.

“I was inspired and amazed by the collaborative team effort that went into caring for my dad,” she says. “The actions and words of this group of nurses, doctors, and others not only changed my dad’s life, but every member of my family and our circle of friends. It was then that I decided I wanted to be a part of the health care team.”

And Susan found her home at CHOC Mission.

“We are the experts of children in our neighborhood,” she says. “We have provided a level of care to our patients and families that I believe they don’t receive elsewhere. We strive to be better and to continue to learn new practices and improve our care.”

And now with CHOC Mission celebrating a quarter century of service to the community, Susan feels great pride.

“It’s really exciting for me,” she says. “I’m proud to have been here for 18 of those years, and I’m proud that we’ve been here for the community, and that CHOC Mission was here for my family when we needed them.”

Learn more about CHOC Children's at Mission Hospital

Related posts:

CHOC Children’s at Mission Hospital Celebrates 25 Years Serving South Orange County

Today, we salute our outstanding physicians, nurses, associates and volunteers at CHOC Children’s at Mission Hospital for providing 25 years of compassionate, world-class care to South Orange County families.

Since its opening on July 15, 1993, CHOC Mission has nurtured, advanced and protected the health and well-being of children through its state-of-the-art facility and top-rated programs and services. As the only dedicated pediatric health care facility for families in south Orange County, the surrounding coastal areas and north San Diego County, CHOC Mission is a separately licensed 54-bed “hospital within a hospital” on the fifth floor of Mission Hospital.

choc-childrens-mission-hospital-25-years-infograhic

Learn more about CHOC Children's at Mission Hospital

Related posts:

Mental Health Staff Give Back Through CHOC Walk

Inspired by the care provided to patients and families at CHOC Children’s and the desire to further eliminate the stigma of living with a mental health condition, clinical staff members of the newly opened Mental Health Inpatient Center have formed a team for CHOC Walk in the Park, one of the largest and most anticipated fundraising events of the year. The team will join a crowd of more than 15,000 CHOC supporters for the Walk on Sunday, August 26.

choc-walk-mental-health-team
Select clinical members of the Mental Health Inpatient Center’s CHOC Walk in the Park team.

The team, Stomp Out Stigma, has already organized two fundraisers, with a third in the works, to support their fundraising goal for the Walk. The first two fundraisers were held at local restaurants, with a portion of proceeds going to their team. An upcoming fundraiser, at a local thrift shop, allows community members to drop off and donate household goods such as clothing, books and home supplies in exchange for denominations to the team.

The staff wanted to come together and form a team for the Walk, one of the largest and most visible fundraisers of the year, to further decrease the stigma associated with mental health.

“Mental health has a stigma attached to it, so we wanted to create a team to inspire others to decrease that stigma that can be associated with mental health,” says Kelsey, a clinical nurse in the Center and team captain of Stomp Out Stigma. “We want to promote that mental health is just as important as physical health, and by participating in this Walk as a team, we are helping to bring mental health into a new light.

The team also hopes their participation in CHOC Walk will provide further education about the new Center.

“We want the community to know that Center is a healing, nurturing environment that provides resources to families in need as well as a safe place for children to learn how to cope with their Mental Illness,” Kelsey says. “Mental health is important because it includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel, and act. It also helps determine how we handle stress, relate to others, and make choices. Mental health is important at every stage of life, from childhood and adolescence through adulthood.”

The chance to be part of a patient and family’s healing process is what inspired Kelsey to pursue a nursing career.

“I believe that nursing is simply to give tender loving care while applying it to the everyday concept of medical care,” she says. “I have been a pediatric psychiatric registered nurse for five years. When I learned that CHOC was building a Mental Health Inpatient Center, I wanted to be a part of it since it is my goal to be able to give back to my local community.”

Since joining CHOC’s staff, Kelsey has been inspired by CHOC’s commitment to innovation.

“I’m thoroughly excited to be a part of an ever-changing, excellent organization where our strive is to provide innovative health care to patients and their families. Being the first Mental Health Inpatient Center for children under the age of 12 in Orange County, we are inspired to change the way mental health is viewed through the community as well as the way care is given to our population.”

Register Now!

Related posts:

 

Meet our Teen Advisory Council

Say hello to our inaugural class of teen advisers.

The CHOC Children’s Teen Advisory Council is made up of outstanding teens who are active in their community, committed to academic success, and support CHOC’s mission to nurture, advance and protect the health and well-being of children.

Being a teenager isn’t easy. There’s peer pressure, academic pressure, hormones, and college applications to think about. Sometimes it’s helpful to get advice from a parent or trusted mentor, but sometimes as a teenager you just want to hear straight from other teens, especially about topics that may be hard to talk about.

You’ll see these faces on our blog, and hear them on our podcast, discussing how they and their friends deal with common issues teens face, from bullying to healthy eating to stress management, and everything in between. From time to time they may be joined by a CHOC Children’s clinician or other staff member.

Today, they’re giving us a sneak peek inside their summer plans.

choc-childrens-teen-adviser-alyssa

Alyssa Mercado, 14

This summer I am keeping busy babysitting for family and friends. I will be staying active by going to the gym, and training for the upcoming volleyball season. I am also maintaining my social life by meeting up with friends and hanging out on my free time.

choc-childrens-teen-adviser-layla

Layla Valenzuela, 12

This summer, I will be playing volleyball, participating in a fun theater camp, hanging out with friends and traveling to Alaska with my family. Playing volleyball during the summer will prepare me for the next club season and help keep me in shape. Performing arts is near and dear to my heart, as is hanging out with my friends and traveling with my family. It’s going to be a busy, but very fun and engaging summer!

choc-childrens-teen-advisor-heather

Heather Bisset, 14

I plan to keep busy this summer by playing tournaments with my club volleyball team, going to the beach and spending time with my friends, and studying for my upcoming AP European History class. I also hope to find a volunteer position at an animal shelter.

choc-childrens-teen-adviser-carina

Carina Alvaro, 14

This summer, I will be taking geometry to advance in math my sophomore year. I will also be participating in several softball recruiting tournaments in hopes of getting committed to a university on a softball scholarship. For fun, I will be hanging out with my friends at the beach and going to concerts.

choc-childrens-teen-adviser-cameron

Cameron Macedonio, 15

Since I have no mandatory commitments over summer like summer school, I am keeping busy by socializing and having fun. We like going to the movies, going out to eat, and going to amusement parks.

choc-childrens-teen-adviser-sanam

Sanam Sediqi, 16

This summer I am keeping up quite a busy schedule. I am currently taking summer college courses including American Sign Language. On the weekends, I work as a body artist for face paint at Disneyland.

Submit a question for our teen advisers

Related posts:

Answers to Parents’ Most Common Questions on Healthy Eating for Kids

By Vanessa Chrisman, clinical dietitian at CHOC Children’s

Healthy eating for kids is an essential part of their overall healthy lives. For children, it’s especially important because their growth and development depends on it. Parents play a large role in providing a healthy diet for their children, as well as establishing lifelong habits when it comes to food. In today’s world of fad diets and conflicting headlines about nutrition and health, it can be confusing for parents to navigate how to feed their children appropriately. Here are some of the most common nutrition questions I get from the parents of my patients.

My child wants to eat the same food every single day. Is this okay? How do I handle this?

Typically, toddlers are the ones who go on food jags – wanting to eat the same food at every meal, day in and day out. It often is a show of independence. This can happen with older children too. While it’s okay to eat the same healthy food every day, it’s the parents’ job to choose what foods to offer at meals. As an example, maybe your child wants cereal at every meal. Rather than provide this, offer other healthy foods and tell your child that she can have cereal for breakfast the next day. Your child then gets to choose whether she eats what is offered at that meal. If she doesn’t, don’t worry. Simply be patient and wait until the next snack time to offer more food. When your child becomes hungry, she will most likely eat what is offered.

My child is a picky eater. How can I convince him to eat more fruits and vegetables?

Start by serving a fruit and a vegetable with every meal. Serve the foods that he already accepts and eats. Introduce one new fruit or vegetable at a time. Make new foods more appealing by cutting them into fun shapes and sizes. Vegetables can be spiralized to look like pasta. Fruits can be cut into stars or dinosaurs with cookie cutters. Set a good example by eating fruits and vegetables regularly as a family. As parents, you are powerful role models for your children who are always watching and listening. Let your child help pick out fruits and vegetables in the grocery store as well as wash them at home. Fruits can be added to smoothies and yogurt and cereal. Vegetables can be cooked into spaghetti sauce or added to stir-fried rice or soups. Sometimes children will want to try new fruits and vegetables if you serve them with a favorite dip or sauce. Consistently serve fruits and vegetables at your meals and be patient. Limit grazing between meals to build hunger and avoid preparing a special meal for your picky eater. Eventually your child will come around and try some of these new foods. Praise the behaviors you want to encourage and give less attention to the pickiness or refusal to try new foods.

I don’t think that my toddler eats enough protein. How much is enough?

Many parents worry that their toddler is not getting enough protein in their diet. The truth is that it is quite easy for a toddler to meet his protein needs. Toddlers ages 1 to 3 need 1.2 grams of protein for every kg of body weight. This means that a healthy 2-year-old boy who weighs 27 pounds (or 12 kg) needs about 14-15 grams of protein per day. His protein needs could be met simply by: drinking eight ounces of one percent milk (eight grams protein) and eating two tablespoons of ground turkey or one large egg (seven grams of protein) in a day. If he drinks sixteen ounces of milk, his daily protein intake increases to 23 grams of protein, which is 150 percent of what he needs. Unless a toddler is eating a very restrictive diet, it’s rare for him to consume a diet low in protein.

My child loves to drink juice and soda but barely drinks any water. How can I get her to drink more water?

This is a challenge that many parents face. The first step is to cut back on the amount of juice or soda that is offered and consumed. Ideally, cut out soda and dilute juice with water. Limit juice to eight ounces or less per day. Provide your child with their own special bottle or cup. Consider using a special straw that they can pick out for themselves. Infuse the water by adding sliced lemons, limes, cucumber, berries, or mint to make a “spa water.” Keep water cold in the fridge. Try using frozen berries instead of ice cubes. Be a role model and carry a water bottle around for yourself. Offer stickers as an incentive for every time your young child drinks a cup of water. On a typical day, kids up to age 8 should drink the number of 8 oz. cups of water equal to their age. For example, a five-year-old should drink five 8-oz. glasses of water every day.

My child is underweight so I let her snack all day long. This will help her gain weight faster, right?

While some parents assume that their child will gain more weight if they are eating all day long, this is not often the case. For underweight children, there can be a tendency for parents to offer food to the child all day long, as well as allow them to ask for food whenever they want it. This does not allow for natural hunger or appetite to build. Instead, the child grazes on food throughout the day, often eating enough to tame hunger but not enough to truly feel full. The best approach is to follow a feeding schedule with planned meals and snacks every two to three hours. Only water should be consumed in between eating times. This helps build hunger. To help with weight gain, added fats and high calorie foods can be offered or used with meals. Sometimes an oral supplement is needed as well if the child is unable to consume enough food to fuel healthy weight gain. Speak with your child’s pediatrician and a registered dietitian for more individualized advice.

My child says he isn’t hungry in the morning and refuses to eat breakfast. How do I get him to eat?

This is a common challenge for many parents. Often, their child isn’t hungry or doesn’t have enough time to eat before heading off to school. To minimize the morning rush and make time for a healthy breakfast, prepare the night before. Close the kitchen by 8:00 p.m. to prevent unneeded late-night snacking. Make sure that your child goes to bed on time so that it’s easier for him to wake up in the morning. Have quick, healthy options on hand like low-sugar cereals with low-fat milk, fresh fruit and string cheese, whole grain muffins, or whole grain toast with peanut or almond butter. Consider offering non-breakfast foods as another way of enticing your child to eat. For those who don’t want to eat, sometimes drinking a fruit and yogurt smoothie works instead. For teens who skip breakfast in the hopes of losing weight, let them know that people who skip breakfast tend to gain weight, not lose. If all else fails, send your child with a healthy snack to be eaten at school.

Want more nutrition tips like these sent straight to your inbox?

Sign up for our KidsHealth e-newsletter.

Related posts: