gomez-family

One Family’s Story of How CHOC Doctors Became Family

Even after six miscarriages, Gladys Salazar and Paul Gomez kept hoping and believing that they would be blessed with a baby. At long last, the dream came true—twice—with the births of Bethany and then Tiffany. “Two miracle babies,” says Gladys.

Bethany has been battling several rare metabolic and mitochondrial disorders since birth, and Gladys and Paul are grateful for the care she receives at CHOC Children’s. Tiffany was cared for at CHOC as well. Unfortunately, her life was cut short by brain cancer. Still, her parents are grateful for the doctors who extended Tiffany’s life and all of the compassionate people at CHOC who supported them through a painful experience.

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Tiffany was affectionately known as “Tiffers.”

Tiffany was initially treated at another hospital, but her tumor didn’t respond to treatment. When it appeared that Tiffany was out of options, Gladys and Paul decided to “focus on making memories with her.” Through the Make-A-Wish Foundation, the family enjoyed outings to Knott’s Berry Farm and Disneyland.

On one of those outings, Tiffany’s color changed, she couldn’t hold anything down and had trouble breathing. An ambulance was called, and when it arrived Gladys went with her instincts and instructed the driver to take them to CHOC. “We made up our minds to let God do what needs to be done,” says Gladys.

At CHOC, Tiffany was examined by pediatric neurosurgeon Dr. Joffre Olaya, who determined that the tumor was growing and causing pressure. He recommended surgery to debulk the tumor. “I was crying,” recalls Gladys, “because I didn’t think it was an option. He said there were risks but that it could be done. The other hospital told us it was out of the picture.”

The difficult operation took five and a half hours. “Dr. Olaya told me he really had to fight to keep my daughter alive,” says Gladys. “He did an amazing job.”

Tiffany spent about a month recuperating in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). She spent four days with heightened breathing. “One of the doctors watched her breathe and said she was a real fighter; strongest diaphragm he’d ever seen,” says Gladys.

Sadly, however, complications developed. “Tiffany was in pain, and couldn’t tell us,” Gladys says. “We met with the palliative care team and decided to take her home. We got to celebrate her third birthday with a fiesta. There were Mariachis and the whole thing. We told everyone, ‘Come celebrate the lives of our daughters.’ We also participated in the CHOC Walk in the Park to help CHOC Children’s. We are so thankful that we got to spend six more months with our little Tiffers. It was all thanks to Dr. Olaya, thanks to CHOC, and thanks to God who brought us here.”

Tiffany was admitted to CHOC one last time, where she passed away peacefully. “But it was hard. After six miscarriages, you think, now this, too?” says Gladys. “But Paul said, ‘God gave us our daughters; we can’t be disappointed.’”

“Tiffany was an angel; she brought joy to countless people. I’m so glad we got the opportunity to meet her. She changed me in many ways. Cancer makes you see things differently. Tiffany’s in good hands now; she’s not hurting anymore.”

Gladys thinks of the team at CHOC as family. “We’ve been to a few hospitals before and there’s no comparison to CHOC,” she says. “Just the love and compassion they show towards the

patients. The doctors, the nurses, the social workers, the chaplain…they all care for you so much. Even the people who do the cleaning, and security—everyone is so polite. There was one nurse who was a mom and grandma, and she was so comforting―she felt like a mother to me. For her, it isn’t just a job, she totally loves what she does. Another nurse, near the end, put a little beanie on Tiffany’s head to help keep her warm. I was so touched by her kindness. I am really grateful for coming here.”

The Gomez family continues to rely on CHOC—Bethany has been hospitalized twice since Tiffany passed away. “One doctor said to me, ‘I’m sorry to you have to go through this now,’” said Gladys. “It was so touching. They know us very well; not like a number, like family.”

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Gladys, Bethany and Paul

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