baby getting enough milk

How to Tell If Your Baby is Getting Enough Milk from Breastfeeding

By Michelle Roberts, registered nurse and certified lactation consultant at CHOC Children’s

Every year in August, we celebrate World Breastfeeding Week. This year’s focus is “Sustaining Breastfeeding Together.” As a lactation consultant, the most common question I get from parents of a breastfed infant is, “How do I know my baby is getting enough?” When we bottle feed an infant we can look at the measurements on the bottle to determine the exact amount that a baby gets. When a mom is breastfeeding, she may be concerned because she can’t see the amount taken. A common reason women give up on breastfeeding is feeling they are not producing enough milk.

Here are 5 key indicators a baby is getting enough milk directly from the breast.

  • Breastfeeding 8-10 times minimum per day. Newborn babies should be breastfed a minimum of 10 times per 24 hours. As the baby gets older and is gaining appropriate weight, they may cut back to 8 times per 24 hours. We recommend keeping a breastfeeding log. Start by downloading a template breastfeeding log.
  • Latches well and maintains latch. Babies should latch and remain latched without coming on and off throughout the feeding. It can be difficult to transfer adequate milk if they are not staying on the breast. For the most part, breastfeeding should not be painful. If you are experiencing bleeding or scabbing, the latch is not deep enough and can lead to low weight gain and low milk supply.
  • Audible swallowing. A baby’s suck pattern and frequency of swallowing will change throughout the first three to five days. When a baby is first born, they will be sucking more often than swallowing but as mom’s milk supply increases, the swallowing should increase too. Mom’s milk usually increases between Day Three and Day Five after giving birth.
  • It is important to track a baby’s diapers to make sure they are producing enough diapers based on their age. Your birth hospital or your pediatrician will provide you with a diaper log that will show you how many wet and dirty diapers are expected based on your baby’s age.
  • Weight Gain. All newborn babies lose some weight shortly after birth. Your pediatrician will determine if they lose too much weight. Once mom’s milk supply has increased in volume, the baby should gain an average of 1 oz. per day.

What do you do if you are not sure your baby is getting enough at the breast?

Your pediatrician is always a great person to help you determine whether your baby is doing well. It is also helpful to reach out to women in your life that have breastfed. Call your mom, your sister, a neighbor or a friend for support. It is also beneficial to be aware of your resources within your community. Most birth hospitals have lactation consultants that can work with you on an outpatient basis. A lactation consultant will be able to determine the amount of milk a baby transferred from your breast to your baby’s stomach by using a breastfeeding scale. They can also assist with supplementing at the breast directly.

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One thought on “How to Tell If Your Baby is Getting Enough Milk from Breastfeeding”

  1. I will never forget how Michelle helped me with breastfeeding when my daughter was admitted to CHOC a few days after she was born. I had seen countless lactation consultants at my delivery hospital, but I continued to struggle and was ready to give up. Michelle was the first person to truly help us get the hang of it and make sure my daughter was getting enough to eat. Thanks to her, we are still breastfeeding 11 months later.

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