occupational therapy at choc

Occupational Therapy Celebrates 100 Years

By Lauren Francis, occupational therapy at CHOC Children’s

Occupational therapy is turning 100! The specialty’s roots formed in 1917 as “reconstruction aides” who helped rehabilitate wounded soldiers returning from battle in World War I. Today, occupational therapists apply a holistic approach to help children and adults engage in meaningful activities.

Occupational therapists are experts in addressing any and all areas that “occupy” one’s time. For infants and children, occupational therapy (OT) includes play, learning to move and explore, feeding and eating, and bonding with parents and caregivers. For children and teenagers, this can include gaining independence with self-care, being successful in school, and playing with friends. Pediatric OT sessions often look like play to the untrained eye – most children really enjoy therapy!

CHOC’s occupational therapists (OTs) are highly skilled and trained to help children of all ages who have unique needs. Some key components of OT are:

Feeding Specialists

For a variety of reasons, children may have trouble getting the nutrition they require to grow and develop. CHOC’s occupational therapists help treat a wide range of feeding issues, including babies who have trouble with breast and bottle-feeding, children who have oral motor or sensory difficulties and cannot manage textures of food, and teenagers who may have had an injury or procedure that affected their ability to eat. OTs at CHOC are also highly skilled in specialty therapies such as feeding tube weaning and swallowing therapy.

Sensory & Developmental Specialists

CHOC’s occupational therapists have advanced expertise and techniques to offer children and families with an assortment of developmental challenges as well. From supporting a child to stay strong and active through chemotherapy to helping a child recover from a neurological disorder or brain injury, occupational therapy can be a crucial part of a multidisciplinary care team. Children who have difficulty with sensory processing, learning delays, challenges with self-care, visual motor or visual perceptual deficits, difficulty coordinating their arms and hands, or who aren’t meeting developmental milestones, can all be excellent candidates for occupational therapy intervention.

Parent/Caregiver Collaboration

Perhaps one of the greatest roles occupational therapists play is working with the parents and families of the children we serve. Parent education and involvement in therapy is an essential component to ensuring a child meets his or her goals. Through CHOC’s commitment to patient- and family-centered care, our OTs closely partner with parents to create individualized treatment plans, offer customized home programs unique to each child’s needs, and engage them in all aspects of care.

Preventative Care

CHOC OTs work tirelessly as part of an advanced team to screen children who may be at risk for developmental delays. They apply years of clinical experience and expertise along with standardized testing to assess a child’s movement, mobility, hand use, interaction with the environment, and feeding skills. For children who require a long hospital stay, OTs help provide developmentally appropriate stimulation to help each child continue to grow and develop during their hospital stay.

If you think your child would benefit from occupational therapy, speak to your child’s primary care doctor.

Learn more about rehabilitation services at CHOC.

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