Female Physicians, Hospital Leaders Observe International Women’s Day

As the world celebrates International Women’s Day, we are highlighting a few of our female physician and hospital leaders. They offer insight and words of encouragement to women seeking to pursue careers in medicine.

international women's day

Kerri Schiller, senior vice president and chief financial officer

Don’t ever be afraid to take a leap – work hard and do your best.  You can be and have whatever it is you strive for – you just have to be willing to work for it.

Find yourself a mentor – someone who you trust and admire.  Keep in touch and reach out when you need advice or just to say hello.

Striking a balance between career and family can be very difficult. Healthcare, in particular, is a profession where the dedication to the well-being of others is of great importance. Having good friends and/or a partner who accepts your role and who shares and supports responsibilities  allows for greater satisfaction both at home and at the job. And, of course, working with people you enjoy and like is critical to your ability to perform your job and love what you do.

Accept the fact that some days will be hard.  I keep a small folder of mementos, including expressions of thanks or acknowledgement I have received from others through the years.  Going through that folder reminds me of times of accomplishments and success, as well as recognition.  There are going to be days when you feel like there’s no one in your court; that’s the day to pull out your file and give yourself a boost.

international women's day

Dr. Maria Minon, vice president of medical affairs and chief medical officer

It is my hope that women professionals in healthcare and other career fields will use Women’s Day as a reminder to exceed expectations and aspire to excellence as the Professionals they are – measuring themselves against all their peers – not just a select group.

A favorite quote of mine is from Eleanor Roosevelt, “One’s philosophy is not best expressed in words; it is expressed in the choices one makes… and the choices we make are ultimately our responsibility.”

I encourage women to take responsibility for themselves and their choices and to rise above to become the great individuals they desire to be.

international women's day

Dr. Mary Zupanc, chair of neurology and director of the pediatric comprehensive epilepsy program

Reach for the stars!  Go for it!  Whatever you want to do, follow your passion and your heart.  Don’t settle for less.  Money should not be the significant driver.  Money does not buy happiness or satisfaction.  In medicine and other careers, it is about making a difference, making the world a better place.

international women's day

Dr. Georgie Pechulis, hospitalist

Follow your instincts. Block out anyone trying to convince you otherwise. At times, you may feel like you have to prove yourself as a woman. Persistence, focus, and determination will allow you to reach your goal, no matter how unattainable it seems.  Failure and picking yourself up to overcome is part of the process. Be patient and respectful, but also respect yourself. Always make time to do something good for yourself. Surround yourself with other strong women to reach out to.

international women's day

Dr. Christine Bixby, neonatologist and medical director of lactation services

My advice for women pursuing a career in medicine is that practicing medicine is a great joy and privilege. The hard work is well worth it. Having a medical career and family can be challenging but finding the right balance can be done with good planning and a great partner.

Go for it! Find what is your passion. Put your head down, do the work and you will definitely succeed.

When I began my career, I wish I would have known that I would find a group of wonderful, smart and supportive women who are always there (even at 2 a.m.) to pick you up and raise you up on the tough days.

Learn more about exploring a career at CHOC Children’s.





Explore career opportunities at CHOC.




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National Nutrition Month 2017: Put Your Best Fork Forward

By Stephanie Prideaux, Dietetic Technician, Registered

This National Nutrition Month, you can help your family put their best selves forward by creating personalized eating and physical activity styles that let you “put your best fork forward.” Try incorporating the following tips into your family’s habits.

Healthy Eating Style

Eating better does not have to be complicated. It can start with focusing on a variety of your favorite healthful foods and making small changes in what needs improvement. A healthy eating pattern focuses on vegetables, fruits, whole grains, oils, and a variety of protein sources, such as seafood, lean meats, poultry, eggs, low-fat dairy, beans, nuts, seeds, and soy products like tofu. As we increase these foods in our diets, we must decrease certain foods at the same time. Highly processed foods contain shockingly high amounts of sodium. It is also important to reduce foods that contain added saturated fat (such as cheese, meats and other animal products), trans fat (such as fried foods, baked goods, stick margarine, frozen pizzas) and sugar. Reading food labels and asking for nutrition information can help you to quickly identify foods to avoid. Small daily substitutions using healthy ingredients can add up over time to create a major shift in the way you eat.

new nutrition label

One technique to control your healthy eating style is by cooking more often at home. Packaged foods, restaurant foods, and take-home grocery store meals are notoriously high in the nutrients we need to avoid:  sodium, saturated fat, trans fat and added sugar. Experimenting with healthy substitutions at home can not only save money, but will allow you to ensure that all food groups are being represented as you create your personal healthy eating style.

Balance is also key when talking about style. We do not want to underdo it or go completely over the top. The same goes with our healthy eating style. In order to feel good, look good, and be ready to take on challenges, we must make sure to eat enough to meet our needs but not so much that we place ourselves at risk for chronic disease. This balance refers to both our total food intake for the day as well as the proportions of each food group on our meal plates. The MyPlate model shows a great visual way to balance our food groups:  fruits/vegetables are half the plate, protein is a quarter of the plate, and complex carbohydrates make up the last quarter.

nutrition

The MyPlate model shows a great visual way to balance our food groups.A simple way to personalize and monitor your total intake is to eat intuitively. Drink plenty of water, eat slowly, and listen to your body throughout the day. Respond to hunger with water, healthy snacks and balanced meals. When you begin to feel full, respect that too and stop eating. For more guidance, the MyPlate website’s SuperTracker tool can help you plan, analyze, and track your diet and physical activity.

Physical Activity Style

Exercise that is custom-tailored to your preferences and abilities is a key component of your health style. Being physically active most days of the week carries benefits for your entire body and future health. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that regular physical activity improves your mental health and mood, strengthens your muscles and bones, and increases your chances of living longer. Regular exercise reduces the risk of many chronic diseases and can help you meet any weight goals you might have.

To cash in on these benefits, federal guidelines of the Healthy People 2020 program recommend that adults engage in at least 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity physical activity or 75 minutes per week of vigorous physical activity. That can sound like a lot, but broken up over five days per week, that would be only 15 to 30 minutes per day of vigorous to moderate-intensity exercise. If gyms are not your style, personalize your physical activity by turning up the intensity of activities you already love. This could be dancing, walking, bicycling, gardening, hiking and more. Jumping in to play along with children is a fun way to meet your goals while building fond memories.

Children and adolescents need even greater amounts of physical activity. The CDC recommends 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous exercise every day that offers a variety of aerobic, muscle-strengthening and bone-strengthening activities. Young people should have their own unique health style that is enjoyable, age-appropriate, and offers a variety of options. Learn how to keep kids active when school is out of session.

Dietitians: Your Health Style Consultant

Teaming up with your primary care physician to meet with a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) can be a great way to set and meet health goals. RDNs can provide reliable, easy-to-follow personalized nutrition advice to meet your lifestyle, preferences, and health-related needs.

This March, let us celebrate National Nutrition Month by taking hold of the tools each one of us has to improve health now and into the future by creating healthy eating habits and engaging in regular exercise. Creating your personal eating and physical activity styles will help you “put your best fork forward” this month and for the years to come.

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Meet the CHOC Follies Cast: Shawn

Now in its 20th year, the CHOC Follies has become one of Orange County’s most popular fund and friend-raising events. With a cast and crew of more than 100 enthusiastic members, all singing and dancing to raise much needed funds for CHOC Children’s, this original musical production is made up of one-of-a-kind individuals all coming together to benefit CHOC. Today meet Shawn, a 10-year cast member who is participating in weekly rehearsals- despite a recent relocation to northern California.

Q: What prompted your continued Follies participation even when you relocated to San Francisco and work in Mexico?

A: I’ve lived most of my adult life up in Orange County, but recently relocated to San Francisco for work. Follies is very important to me, and I couldn’t imagine missing it. Every year I look forward to the people, the energy of the cast, and having the chance to help kids at CHOC. Fortunately I fly a lot for work, and when I pass by Orange County, I stop off for rehearsals. Some of my best friends in the world I met by participating in Follies, and I stay with them when I am in town for rehearsals.

choc follies
CHOC Follies cast member Shawn, before a past performance.

Q: What goes into being a Follies cast member?

A: The cast spends every Saturday rehearsing for two and a half months leading up to the show. It sounds like a lot and maybe it is, but it doesn’t feel like work to me. Some parts of the cast rehearse on Wednesday evenings as well, but since I have relocated for work, I can’t make mid-week rehearsals. When I was living in Orange County, I was working full time and also going to school at night to study accounting, so I couldn’t make mid-week evening rehearsals. The directors understand that cast members have other obligations and support us.

I got started in the Follies when I was attending a lecture at Newport Beach Public Library 10 years ago. I met the Follies founder, Gloria Zigner, who invited me to a rehearsal, and the rest is history. Gloria’s passion for the Follies and what it does to help the kids at CHOC is so infectious, and that spirit permeates the cast. She has been doing this for 20 years, so it makes the 10 Saturdays I give up every spring seem like nothing.

Q: What does CHOC mean to you?

A:  Some people join the Follies because they have a personal history with CHOC or know someone who has a child that has been treated here. For me it’s a little bit different. I don’t have kids, and outside of people in the cast, I don’t directly know too many people who have needed to go to CHOC. But I adore children and I love my nieces and nephews, and just knowing what CHOC does every day is heartwarming. I have a coworker whose son who was diagnosed with cancer last year, and now he is cancer free.  Participating in the Follies has a more personal meaning this year now that I personally know someone who has received the amazing care that CHOC provides for children and teens in the community.

Q: What would you say to someone considering joining the Follies cast next year?

A: Do it! It will change your life. The people in the cast are such caring people, giving their time and energy. The cast has the biggest hearts and you’re doing it for an amazing cause. You get to help thousands of kids. I don’t sing, dance or act, but I do all of them in the show. You don’t have to a lifelong history in musical theater to be in the Follies.

Q: What is your favorite memory from your 10 years participating in Follies?

A: Being backstage before a show, especially the last show. You spend three months with these people, and you’re all nervous and want the show to go well. It always goes off without a hitch, and when they announce how much money we have raised, there’s just so much love and energy in the air. We are all there for one common cause. People from every background and walk of life come together to support CHOC and it’s a phenomenal feeling.



Come celebrate 20 years of singing and dancing for OC's kids. Buy your tickets now.




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Heart Month: Ryden’s Story

At 27 weeks pregnant, Kayleen Enoka discovered her baby boy, Ryden, had hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), a birth defect where the left side of the heart does not form correctly and affects normal blood flow through the heart. As a young, first-time mom, she was overwhelmed by the news.

“I felt incredibly helpless. I felt that I couldn’t do anything to help my baby and I wondered what would happen to him. I also felt that I must have done something wrong during the pregnancy to cause his heart defect. I was reassured by the perinatologist and the cardiologist that his defect wasn’t because of something I had done wrong. My mother sat with me through the diagnosis and held my hand and hugged me as I cried,” Kayleen vividly remembers.

After Ryden was born, he was immediately transferred to CHOC Children’s Hospital to be cared for by our CHOC Heart Institute. Kayleen was a partner in her son’s care from the beginning. He had to undergo a series of three surgeries, performed by Dr. Richard Gates, pediatric cardiothoracic surgeon at CHOC, with the first one, the Norwood Procedure, at just five days old. During the surgery, Dr. Gates made Ryden’s right ventricle the main pumping chamber for blood flow to his body.  A shunt was also placed as a pathway for blood to flow into his lungs to receive oxygen.

heart month
Ryden was transferred to CHOC shortly after he was born for the first of three heart surgeries.

“My family and I all sat together waiting for news during the surgery. It was hard, but having so much support helped a lot. I remember when we walked into the room and everyone seemed to be moving so fast. When I asked how he was doing, I was told he was tenuous. That word has resonated with me over the years because I remember feeling that he wouldn’t survive the night. The doctors showed me where the bypass machine was and told me that it was there in case he needed it; again, I was frightened for my baby wondering if he would be strong enough to get through this. I believed in my heart that he was a fighter, but watching all the activity and how small he looked in his hospital bed, made it much harder to believe,” Kayleen says.

Ryden’s second surgery, the Glenn Shunt Procedure, performed when he was 6 months old, was just as scary because Ryden’s health was fragile, Kayleen recalls. The procedure created a direct connection between the pulmonary artery and the vessel returning oxygen-poor blood from the upper part of the body to the heart. After the surgery, Ryden had numerous complications and was hospitalized for 34 days.

heart month
Ryden at about 6 months of age following his second heart surgery, the Glenn Shunt Procedure.

By the time of Ryden’s third surgery, the Fontan when he was 4 years old, Kayleen was ready but apprehensive. “Since Ryden was a little older, I could be honest with him. I told him what was going to happen, and even though he was scared, he was aware and was still able to smile,” Kayleen says.

Dr. Gates connected Ryden’s pulmonary artery and the vessel returning oxygen-poor blood from the lower part of the body to the heart, which allowed the rest of the blood coming back from the body to go to the lungs.  Ryden spent ten days in the hospital.

heart month
After Ryden’s third heart surgery, his nurses gave him this heart pillow, signed by his care team.

Throughout the years, Ryden has experienced arrhythmias, is susceptible to colds, takes multiple medications, and was recently diagnosed with asthma. Kayleen has developed a close relationship with the CHOC Heart Institute team.

“I have always felt like I am a part of the team. In the beginning, I could never have too many questions; the doctors and nurses always took the time to make sure I understood what was happening. Now, when Ryden needs to be hospitalized, the care team always listens to my input. We work together because they understand that I know my son best,” she says.

Among the many experts involved in Ryden’s care, the Enokas have a special relationship with Dr. Anthony Chang, pediatric cardiologist at CHOC.

heart month
Ryden and his cardiologist, Dr. Anthony Chang.

“Dr. Chang has been amazing. I wouldn’t have chosen another cardiologist because he takes the time to care for his patients. Ryden really admires him and often says when he grows up he wants to work on hearts like him,” Kayleen says.

“Ever since I took care of a baby with HLHS in 1983, my passion to help children with congenital heart disease has never subsided. HLHS is a heart defect that requires the supreme dedication of both doctors and nurses in cardiology and cardiac surgery as well as intensive care. It is, however, parents like Kayleen who continue to inspire all of us to help these children, and humbles us in all that they do when these children are not in the hospital or clinic,” Dr. Chang says.

Kayleen’s appreciation for CHOC and its mission inspired her to become an employee. She works as a department assistant in the clinical education and professional development department. She also volunteers her time as a member of the Family Advisory Council, an important group of patients’ family members who provide input on decisions, initiatives and discussions at CHOC. In addition, Kayleen participates in the CHOC Walk every year with “Team Ryden,” including friends, family and cardiovascular intensive care unit (CVICU) nurses.

heart month
Ryden inspires a group of family and friends to participate in CHOC Walk every year in his honor.

Today, Ryden is a happy, fun-loving 7-year-old, who enjoys swimming and playing baseball. Throughout his journey, one thing that has remained unwavering, is Kayleen and Ryden’s close relationship. When Ryden has questions about his heart, Kayleen is always happy to talk openly and lovingly with her son, and reminds him that he has a “special heart.” His middle name — Pu’uwaikila — means “heart of steel,” and Kayleen’s little fighter is surely living up to the name.

heart month
Kayleen Enoka and her son Ryden.

As American Heart Month comes to a close, Kayleen offers parents of heart patients the following tried and true tips that have helped her along the way:

1. Trust your child to know his limits. I’ve always let Ryden push himself, while still keeping a close eye on him of course.

  1. When your child is developmetally ready, be open and honest about his condition. You might be worried you’ll scare him/her, but I’ve always felt that Ryden has the right to know what’s happening to him.
  2. Children with congenital heart diseases may have self-esteem issues (i.e. scars, lack of ability to keep up with other children.) Remember to let your child know that he/she is special and what makes them different is also what makes them amazing. I always tell Ryden that his scar on his chest is what shows his strength. And, that chicks dig scars – it’s an inside joke (he’s never allowed to date).



Help a patient like Ryden. Donate here.




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CHOC Heart Surgery Patient Joins Security Team

As the only hospital in Orange County to perform open heart surgery on babies and children, CHOC Children’s and its Heart Institute team form special bonds with the patients entrusted to their care.

Many CHOC patients come back to visit and say thank you, some send holiday cards and share school photos so their care teams can see them grow up. A few even return to CHOC as employees, eager to be part of the organization that saved their lives.

Daniel Davis was just 13 years old when Dr. Richard Gates, surgeon-in-chief at CHOC and co-medical director of the Heart Institute, performed surgery on his heart. Eight years later Daniel returned to CHOC as a security officer, helping establish a calm and safe environment at the hospital that cared for him as a teen. He has biannual checkups with Dr. Anthony Chang, pediatric cardiologist at CHOC.

Daniel was born with a subaortic membrane, meaning that his heart had tissue growth below the aortic valve. This caused partial blood flow blockage from the left ventricle, which pumps blood to the rest of the body. This put stress on Daniel’s heart, and if left untreated, could have caused heart failure.  He had already gone through his first open- heart surgery at just three days old.

“I grew up in Orange County and wanted to return to CHOC for work because it’s so close to my heart,” he says. “Growing up I wanted to pursue a career in the military, so a security position was a first step, but now I’m pursuing my EMT certification and eventually a career in nursing.”

Daniel loves working in The Julia and George Argyros Emergency Department and observing the environment.

“I’m constantly impressed by the speed and efficiency of the emergency department staff, how they work at such a high level at such a great speed,” he says. “The emergency department is filled with the unexpected and it keeps you on your toes. Since the ED is so fast-paced, you have to be ready for anything.”

Part of Daniel’s job involves escorting patients and families on campus, as well as to and from the Orange County Ronald McDonald House. On more than one occasion, he’s been able to calm a flustered parent by sharing his story. Seeing an example of the great care CHOC provides is comforting to parents in what can be an otherwise stressful time, he has learned.

When not protecting the hallways of CHOC, he participates in Spartan races, an ultra-competitive obstacle course.

choc heart surgery
When not working at CHOC, Daniel competes in Spartan Races, an ultra-competitive obstacle course. He’s never let his heart condition or past surgeries keep him from completing his goals.

“I never used my heart condition as an excuse to get out of things like physical education class growing up,” he says. “I love being active whenever possible, and encouraging my friends and colleagues in their physical fitness goals as well.”

His commitment to fitness goals does not go unnoticed by his security teammates.

“The obstacle courses Daniel competes in require your body to be pushed to a whole new level,” says Steven Barreda, security services supervisor at CHOC. “Daniel and I work evenings, and on more than one occasion, we’ve worked overtime until 2:00 a.m. and even after a 12 -hour shift, he goes to the gym to train for his next race.”

For Daniel’s surgeons, seeing a former patient grow up to live a normal, healthy life is a joy. Being able to call him a colleague is even better.

“Daniel is fortunate to have a surgically curable condition that when treated properly and timely should allow him a completely healthy and long life, and it’s great that he leads such an athletic lifestyle,” Dr. Gates says. “We have a few patients and parents of patients who work at CHOC. It’s always great and inspiring to hear stories of how they are doing and getting along.”

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How to Get Kids to Brush Their Teeth

February is Children’s Dental Health Month, and we are brushing up on tips for healthy teeth, and examining the causes of halitosis, or bad breath.

What is halitosis and how can you avoid it?

Some bacteria in the mouth are odor-producing, which can lead to halitosis (bad breath.) If you don’t floss and brush regularly, these bacteria can build up. Mouthwash is a temporary fix, but if you do choose to use one, opt for an antiseptic one, which kills the germs that cause bad breath. A plaque-reducing mouth wash should have a seal of approval from the American Dental Association. For small children use an alcohol-free mouthwash. Your dentist can provide specific recommendations.

What is the cause of bad breath if you are brushing twice per day? There can be many reasons, but you may not be brushing long enough, says Dr. Richard Mungo, chair of pediatric dentistry at CHOC Children’s. Each brushing should last for two minutes, but the average person only brushes for about 45 seconds, Mungo says. Try setting a timer for the full amount of time or using one of the many Apps that are available on the internet to help children brush longer and have fun. Using electric toothbrushes are another way to ensure a proper brushing, he says. Electric brushes can be more efficient and many are programmed to stay on for the required two minutes, assuring a good brushing of all surfaces.

how to get kids to brush their teeth
Dr. Richard Mungo, chair of pediatric dentistry at CHOC Children’s

If bad breath persists despite proper brushings and flossing and regular trips to the pediatric dentist, your child may have post nasal drip or other sinus problems, contributing to the halitosis. If there are cavities present or inflamed gums, these difficulties must be attended to. Consult your pediatric dentist or pediatrician who can determine if something else is causing the bad breath.

How to get kids to brush their teeth:

It can be tricky to get kids to brush and floss regularly, but building healthy oral hygiene habits early in life is important. Dr. Mungo offers tips to getting little ones on board with brushing and flossing:

  • Play your child’s favorite song while they are brushing to get them used to brushing for the full two minutes.
  • Be a good example. If your children see you brushing and flossing regularly, they are more likely to model your behavior.
  • Let children choose their own toothbrush and toothpaste, from choices recommended by your dentist.
  • Create a positive attitude towards going to the dentist. Your child’s first visit should be at age one, or when the first tooth erupts into the mouth. That first early visit will introduce you to proper oral health care, emergency services that are available and proper dietary concerns for your children. Children can often pick up on parents’ anxiety, so be a good actor when present with the child, so they can be comfortable and confident that going to the dentist is fun.

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Infographic: Amazing Heart Facts

What’s a better time than Valentine’s Day to learn more about the heart?

This infographic will help you expand your heart smarts.

heart facts



Get tips on how to keep your child's heart healthy




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Electrophysiology Advances Restore Patient’s Quality of Life

A teenaged patient’s longtime arrhythmia has been repaired and her quality of life dramatically improved thanks to emerging technology and the skill of a CHOC Children’s cardiologist.

Lauren Flotman, 15, had experienced irregular heartbeats for years before Dr. Francesca Byrne, a pediatric cardiology specialist, diagnosed her with supraventricular tachycardia, or SVT, and Dr. Tony McCanta, a pediatric heart rhythm specialist, repaired the condition through radiofrequency ablation.

The episodes first surfaced when Lauren was about 8 years old and they began increasing in frequency as she aged. They’d occur without warning or pattern.

For Lauren and her family, the sudden attacks caused great concern. Not only was she drained and tired after an episode, but Lauren dreaded them happening, especially during a pep squad routine when her teammates were depending on her.

Lauren was elated to finally have a name for her condition.

“It was a huge relief for sure to have a diagnosis,” she says. “I always had to just describe the feeling because I didn’t have a name. Now I can say I have SVT.”

Lauren’s diagnosis was reached after a Holter monitor captured her heart racing at 220 beats per minute. Dr. Byrne referred Lauren to Dr. McCanta to discuss treatment options, which included anti-arrhythmic medications or an ablation procedure.  After reviewing their options carefully, the Flotmans decided to pursue ablation.

For Lauren’s ablation, Dr. McCanta used a new technology called an intracardiac echocardiogram, or ICE, to create a three-dimensional map of the inside of her heart without using fluoroscopy (X-Ray radiation), enabling a catheter to apply radiofrequency energy to the precise location in her heart causing her SVT.

ICE technology involves a tiny ultrasound probe imbedded into a catheter that is advanced through the vein directly into the heart, allowing for very clear, accurate image quality. These ultrasound images then integrate with a three-dimensional electroanatomical mapping system, which acts like a GPS (global positioning system) for the catheters within patients’ hearts, to provide an accurate real-time shell of the inside of the patient’s heart. This allows the doctor to safely move catheters inside the beating heart without using radiation.

electrophysiology
Dr. McCanta and the electrophysiology team at CHOC were among the first in the world to routinely utilize intracardiac echocardiography in pediatric and adolescent patients.

While radiofrequency ablation has become a safe and common treatment for SVT in children and adolescents since the mid-2000s, intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) has not traditionally been used in pediatrics due to the large-sized catheters. But when a smaller catheter was created, which was more suitable for the size of young patients, Dr. McCanta and the electrophysiology team from the CHOC Children’s Heart Institute were among the first in the world to routinely utilize the new technology in pediatric and adolescent patients.

“For a young, healthy patient like Lauren, increasing safety and minimizing the use of radiation are extremely important, while still being able to provide a cure for her arrhythmia with ablation” says Dr. McCanta.

After a few days of taking it easy following the procedure, Lauren felt back to her usual self – only without the constant fear her heart would suddenly begin racing.

electrophysiology
Lauren’s longtime arrhythmia has been repaired and her quality of life has dramatically improved, thanks to the electrophysiology team at CHOC.

“Our team loves utilizing advanced technologies like ICE and three-dimensional mapping to help children, adolescents, and young adults with heart rhythm problems,” says Dr. McCanta, “Seeing patients like Lauren get back to all of the things they love doing is why we do this!”

Since the procedure, Lauren has been vocal at church to educate her peers about being conscious and vocal about their health.


Get the facts about CHOC's advanced electrophysiology program



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Two Oncologists with Special Interest in Immunotherapy Join Hyundai Cancer Institute at CHOC Children’s

Two oncologists have joined the team of nationally-recognized specialists of the Hyundai Cancer Institute at CHOC Children’s. Dr. Josephine HaDuong and Dr. Ashley Plant were both fellowship trained at two of the country’s top cancer programs, and share research interest in immunotherapy and targeted therapies.

Dr. Josephine HaDuong is board-certified in pediatric hematology and oncology, and was drawn to the Cancer Institute for what she refers to as its gold standard of care.

“The Hyundai Cancer Institute is a growing center that strives to be among the best. The team provides patients access to cutting-edge clinical trials that may lead to breakthroughs in pediatric cancer,” says Dr. HaDuong.

Her research is driven, in large part, by her clinical interest in caring for patients with solid tumors. A published author and principal investigator in a number of studies, Dr. HaDuong’s major research activities include exploring developmental therapeutics in solid tumors using immunomodulatory and targeted agents, as well as functional imaging in bone and soft tissue sarcomas using magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

Following medical school at the University of Pittsburgh, where she earned a full tuition merit scholarship, Dr. HaDuong completed her residency and pediatric hematology/oncology fellowship training at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles. She was honored with the Fellow of the Year, Excellence in Teaching Award.

She is a member of numerous professional associations, including American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, and North American Consortium for Histiocytosis. In addition to English, she speaks Spanish and Vietnamese.

Raised in Orange County, Dr. HaDuong is thrilled to be back in her hometown. “I have always wanted to return home to serve the children and families in Orange County. I look forward to being a part of an incredible team who works relentlessly to end cancer,” says Dr. HaDuong.

Dr. Ashley Plant is committed to growing CHOC’s neuro-oncology treatment program, and eager to bring new therapies to patients with brain tumors. “I look forward to collaborating with academia and industry to bring early clinical trials to CHOC, especially in the area of immunotherapy. I am also excited to partner with my new colleagues to advance the work the Cancer Institute has been doing to reduce the long-term toxicities of cancer therapy,” says Dr. Plant.

Dr. Plant is a published author whose research interests include early phase clinical trial design for pediatric brain tumors. Her most recent project is a phase 1 clinical trial for a neo-antigen heat shock protein vaccine for diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma, a fatal brain tumor. She hopes to enroll patients in this trial within the next year. She considers herself fortunate to have worked under world-renowned immuno-oncologists Dr. Glenn Dranoff and Dr. Jerome Ritz at Dana Farber Cancer Institute in Boston. There, she won the Young Investigator Award for a project evaluating clonality of T cell receptors in pediatric gliomas.

Following medical school at Stanford University, Dr. Plant finished her residency at University of California, Los Angeles. Her fellowship training in pediatric hematology/oncology was completed at Boston Children’s Hospital. She received additional training in clinical trials and public health at Harvard Chan School of Public Health.

“I was attracted to CHOC because the hospital prioritizes excellent clinical care of patients above all else,” says Dr. Plant. “The hospital’s commitment to patient-and-family-centered care is something I wholeheartedly support. Cancer affects everyone in the family – physically, emotionally, psychologically and sometimes even financially. If we fail to address these issues, we are not completely caring for our patients and their families.”

Learn more about the Hyundai Cancer Institute at CHOC Children’s.

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Meet Dr. Wyman Lai

Just in time for American Heart Month, meet Dr. Wyman Lai, a nationally-recognized pediatric cardiologist with expertise in fetal cardiology and non-invasive imaging for heart disease in fetuses, and children at CHOC Children’s. Dr. Lai is the new medical director of echocardiography at CHOC and co-medical director of the CHOC Heart Institute.

Dr. Wyman Lai
Dr. Wyman Lai, medical director of echocardiography at CHOC and co-medical director of the CHOC Heart Institute.

“CHOC has a fabulous mix of state-of-the-art care, community presence, and academic achievement. I thoroughly enjoy working with my colleagues, who strive to provide the very best care available. The administrative staff at CHOC has also been extremely supportive. Together we are building a pediatric service that rivals any in the region, and we have our sights on even higher goals,” says Dr. Lai.

Dr. Lai’s passion for helping others inspired him to become a doctor. His original plan was to go into academic primary care pediatrics – a teaching and research position, and he majored in maternal and child health for his Master of Public Health degree. Early in his training, he became fascinated with what pediatric cardiologists were doing, and he switched to pediatric cardiology.

“The heart is an amazingly complex organ; it starts off as a simple tube, and it’s a wonder that it develops into a four-chambered pumping organ that delivers oxygen efficiently throughout our body,” says Dr. Lai. “In pediatric cardiology, we are able to make a profound difference in the lives of our patients. With our surgical colleagues, we have made incredible advances in life-saving therapies over the past five decades.”

Dr. Lai attended medical school at the Alpert Medical School of Brown University. He completed his residency at UCLA Ronald Reagan Medical Center, followed by a pediatric cardiology fellowship at UCLA Medical Center, and much later, a pediatric cardiology MRI fellowship at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Since joining CHOC, Dr. Lai has been treating patients with complex congenital heart disease. He is also treating patients with the full spectrum of heart conditions, from heart murmurs to chest pain and syncope.

Dr. Lai’s approach towards his patients and their families is to treat them like family members.

“As with all families, however, not everyone is the same,” he explains. “Some patients and parents want more medical information and some less. Some want to be very involved in the decision-making process and some not so much. My practice is to provide them with enough information and support, so they feel comfortable with the decisions they are making.”

Along with Drs. Nita Doshi and Pierangelo Renella, Dr. Lai is helping to build a great program in fetal cardiology at CHOC. He is also working with Dr. Renella to grow the congenital cardiac MRI program, including the use in non-invasive imaging for creating 3D heart models.

“We recently used a 3D cardiac MRI dataset to print several heart models that were used to assist in the planning of care for a child with complex congenital heart disease. Another area of innovation is our purchase of new patient monitoring software in the cardiovascular ICU that will help us to identify patients at risk for acute deterioration before it happens,” Dr. Lai says.

In his spare time, Dr. Lai loves spending time with his family. He also enjoys swimming, biking and running. He hopes to run in this year’s Boston and New York marathons, which he has participated in the past. He is also attending classes for a health care executive MBA at UC Irvine.





Learn more about CHOC fetal cardiology




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