Play as a Means to Improved Social Skill Development

social skill developmentIn recognition of national autism awareness month, check out these tips from Kelly McKinnon-Bermingham, director of behavior intervention at The Center for Autism & Neurodevelopmental Disorders, to include more interactive and educational play in your child’s routine.

Social play is the core of social development for children. Delayed or undeveloped social skills are often a component of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). As a result, children on the autism spectrum often end up frustrated and socially isolated. Research shows that children with autism may be even more likely to experience loneliness and poor quality friendships than their typical developing peers.

Further, in the age of technology, the definition of and ways that children play have changed. Some technology is often a one-sided experience that does not provide children the chance to learn the subtleties of human interaction such as non-verbal cues, voice tone or inflection and body language. As adults, we have often forgotten how to play. Taking the time to bring out the child in you may help your child to develop their social play skills.

Start with simple, closed-ended activities. Toys that have a clear beginning and ending, such as puzzles, stacking a tower of blocks or lacing beads, is a great place to start because your child will know when to start and when to stop. Play several of these activities in a row to increase the amount of time your child is engaged in a functional play activity.

Pretend play skills often develop from a child’s personal experiences. Act out the day’s events, such as playing school, make-believe fireman or tea or birthday party. Add in some technology by making videos of your play to watch and rehearse. This can make for a fun, motivating play experience.

Supplement your play ideas by using books as a guide. Many books guide children through play experiences. A book on what a veterinarian does, for example, can be used to play veterinarian and follow along!

Additionally, literature suggests several variables that may be important to add in the facilitation of play dates:
1. Use of toys that are of interest to your child
2. Short, structured play experiences
3. Find a consistent, same or slightly older peer for your child to practice and play with

Schedule time to play with your child. Make it a routine and part of your day!

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