Summer safety tips from your pediatrician

Kids are still kids, even during a pandemic – they play, they get sick and sometimes they get hurt. We spoke to Dr. Angela Dangvu, a CHOC Children’s pediatrician, about what parents can do to keep kids safe this summer.

dr-angela-dangvu
Dr. Angela Dangvu, a CHOC Children’s pediatrician

COVID-19 precautions

With no vaccine currently available, the best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed. In addition to practicing proper handwashing, people should watch for symptoms and avoid going out if they feel ill. When outside the home, people should physically distance from others whenever possible, and wear a face covering. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends the use of cloth face coverings in public for those over age 2. The governor of California has mandated that face coverings be worn by the general public when outside the home. Read the full order, including exemptions, here.

Be safe around water

A child can drown in as little as 2 inches of water – so keep an eye on all bodies of water like bathtubs and ice chests, in addition to pools. Assign a “water watcher” who knows how to swim and can provide constant, uninterrupted supervision. Learn more about water safety.

Wear your sunscreen

Everyone over 6 months should wear sunscreen when they’re outdoors. Infants younger than 6 months should be kept out of the sun.

Apply a sunscreen with SPF 30 at least 15-30 minutes before you go outside. Reapply every two hours or after swimming or sweating. Wide-brimmed hats and sunglasses offer extra protection. Limit time spent outside between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. to minimize down on sun exposure. Also be aware that surfaces like sand and water reflect sunlight, so it’s possible to get burnt even when you’re in the shade. This is especially true for infants.

Review family emergency preparedness plans

Emergencies are not on pause just because there is a pandemic. Create and practice a fire escape plan with your family. Double-check smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors.

Practice poison precautions

Avoid household poisoning hazards and save the Poison Control Center’s phone number in your cell phone: 1-800-222-1222 for serious emergencies or simple questions. Store medicine and vitamins up high and out of sight. Remind children that medicine is not candy.

Helmet safety

Most serious head injuries can be avoided by wearing a properly fitting helmet. By law in California, everyone under 18 years of age must wear a Consumer Product Safety Commission-approved helmet while bicycling, riding a scooter, skateboard, or using roller-skates or in-line skates. Parents should enforce this rule even when kids are riding in areas where they don’t expect to encounter vehicles.

Learn more about the most common summer injuries that send kids to the emergency department – and how to avoid them.

If your child is ill or injured during the COVID-19 pandemic, rest assured that it is safe to seek the care they need. Here’s a guide on deciding where to go for care during COVID-19.

This article was updated July 22, 2020.

Find a CHOC pediatrician near you

Related posts:

Body mass index or BMI: What parents should know

By Dr. Angela Dangvu, a CHOC Children’s pediatrician

dr-angela-dangvu
Dr. Angela Dangvu, a CHOC Children’s pediatrician

 As a pediatrician, I spend much of my day doing well child visits for my patients. A big part of those appointments is looking at a child’s growth. Parents are usually interested in knowing their child’s weight and height percentiles, but they rarely ask directly about body mass index or BMI.

What is body mass index?

BMI is a measure of a person’s weight in relation to their height. It varies based on the age and gender of the person and is used to estimate the amount of body fat.

BMI is calculated starting at 2 years of age.  At this age it tends to be higher and will generally get lower until a child is 5 or 6 years old. Then, it will increase with age as they grow into early adulthood. Often, parents of children ages 3 to 4 ask me if their child is too skinny. They’ve begun to notice that their once chubby-looking toddler has thinned out. This is completely normal but can cause parents to overfeed their child because they think they are underweight.

Kids come in many different shapes, so they shouldn’t all have the same BMI. There is a wide range of BMIs that are considered normal. On the lower end, the normal range for BMI starts at the 5th percentile — meaning that 5% of children of the same age and gender will have a BMI lower than them. On the higher end of normal is a BMI in the 85th percentile, which means that 85% of kids of the same age and gender will have a lower BMI.

A BMI lower than the 5th percentile is considered underweight, while a BMI between the 85th and 95th percentile is in the overweight category. A BMI of more than the 95th percentile is considered obese.

When a child’s BMI indicates that they are underweight, it can be a sign of a medical condition that is preventing them from gaining weight. When a child’s BMI puts them in the overweight or obese range, we as pediatricians worry that they could be gaining too much weight, putting them at risk for diseases like diabetes or high blood pressure when they are older.

What body mass index is not

BMI is not a perfect measurement of a child’s body fat, but rather it is just one tool that we use in evaluating a patient’s overall growth and nutrition.

For example, a child being underweight doesn’t always mean they have a medical condition or are not getting enough calories. The child could be underweight because of genetic factors; perhaps both parents were thin as kids, and their child is taking after them.

How your pediatrician can help you improve your child’s BMI

As physicians we look at multiple sources of information to determine why a patient is underweight. We look at the growth chart, medical history and family history. We might order lab tests and refer our patients to a specialist depending on the findings. If the child appears to simply need to consume more calories, I usually encourage the family to incorporate some more calorie-dense foods into the child’s diet, rather than getting into a power struggle with their child about the amount of food they are eating.

If your child’s BMI is in the overweight or obese category, your physician should work with your family to determine possible causes, and solutions as well. Many parents already know that their child’s weight is a concern, but others may not notice that it has become an issue.  With my patients, I try to identify factors in their diet and activity levels to find potential areas for change. One thing to remember with children is that they will continue to grow into their teens, meaning that the goal doesn’t usually need to be weight loss. If they can slow their weight gain or even go for a period of time without gaining weight as they grow in height, their BMI will improve.

Learn more about CHOC’s Primary Care Network

Related posts: