A Reunion of Heroes: Katie’s Story

After recently being discharged, Katie Flathom stopped by the CHOC Children’s cardiovascular intensive care unit (CVICU) again to make some introductions.

Suddenly, the 16-year-old has a group of heroes in her life: the coach who resuscitated her on school campus and the CHOC team that treated Katie for three weeks and will continue her care as she navigates life with a newly diagnosed heart condition.

During a recent athletic conditioning class in school, Katie collapsed and went into sudden cardiac arrest.

Her trained and quick-thinking conditioning coach snapped into action and resuscitated Katie with CPR until paramedics could arrive and transport her to CHOC.

“It was the longest 10 minutes of my life,” said Greg Vandermade, Katie’s coach at Mater Dei High School who also credits other students for alerting him to Katie’s condition and calling 911, as well as fellow staff who assisted by obtaining an automated external defibrillator (AED) to shock Katie’s heart into a normal rhythm.

At CHOC, Katie continued to have irregular heartbeats that required further defibrillation and cardioversion, procedures that help restore the heart’s natural heart rhythm, said Dr. Anthony McCanta, a CHOC cardiologist.

Katie also went on extracorporeal life support, a treatment that takes over the heart’s pumping function and the lungs’ oxygen exchange until a patient can recover from injury. This allowed the CHOC Children’s Heart Institute team to continue to treat her life-threatening arrhythmias with medication, Dr. McCanta said.

Dr. McCanta performed an electrophysiology study procedure and implanted beneath Katie’s skin a subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillator, a device that helps prevent sudden cardiac arrest in patients.

After Katie’s discharge and further testing, she was diagnosed with Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia, or ARVD.  A rare type of cardiomyopathy  where the muscle tissue in the heart’s right ventricle is infiltrated and replaced by fatty tissue and scar tissue, ARVD weakens the heart’s ability to pump blood and makes the heart susceptible to life-threatening arrhythmias.

The diagnosis also means Katie, a cross country and track athlete, will need to give up running for good.

“It was hard at first,” she said.

But instead of sitting on the sidelines, Katie’s decided to pick up golf, a sport that’s compatible with ARVD.

Katie has even begun incorporating a golf swing into her physical therapy sessions at CHOC, and she had two clubs in tow as she, her family and coach Greg visited the CVICU recently.

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When Katie came back to visit the CVICU team and reunite her heroes, her CHOC care team presented her with a heart-shaped pillow, which they all signed with well wishes.

There, Dr. McCanta and the CHOC team presented Greg with a plaque recognizing him for his swift response and efforts that surely saved Katie’s life.

“Coach Greg responded to Katie with CPR on the spot and saved her life that day,” Dr. McCanta said. “His heroic actions, and those of Katie’s schoolmates and staff, including obtaining and appropriately using the AED, are the reason that Katie is alive today.”

Katie’s story underscores the importance of being trained in CPR and in the use of AEDs, Dr. McCanta said.

“Having AEDs in schools and training staff and students in CPR with an AED are some of the most important interventions that we have in saving lives of young people experiencing sudden cardiac arrest,” he said.

Getting AEDs installed in schools is among the goals of CHOC’s Life-Threatening Events Associated with Pediatric Sports – or LEAPS – program.

Coincidentally, Katie’s own grandmother, a nurse and health services coordinator in the Irvine Unified School District, has collaborated with LEAPS and helped get AEDs installed on her district’s campuses.

“Never did I think though that this would happen to one of my own family members,” said Marcia, Katie’s grandmother.

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Electrophysiology Advances Restore Patient’s Quality of Life

A teenaged patient’s longtime arrhythmia has been repaired and her quality of life dramatically improved thanks to emerging technology and the skill of a CHOC Children’s cardiologist.

Lauren Flotman, 15, had experienced irregular heartbeats for years before Dr. Francesca Byrne, a pediatric cardiology specialist, diagnosed her with supraventricular tachycardia, or SVT, and Dr. Tony McCanta, a pediatric heart rhythm specialist, repaired the condition through radiofrequency ablation.

The episodes first surfaced when Lauren was about 8 years old and they began increasing in frequency as she aged. They’d occur without warning or pattern.

For Lauren and her family, the sudden attacks caused great concern. Not only was she drained and tired after an episode, but Lauren dreaded them happening, especially during a pep squad routine when her teammates were depending on her.

Lauren was elated to finally have a name for her condition.

“It was a huge relief for sure to have a diagnosis,” she says. “I always had to just describe the feeling because I didn’t have a name. Now I can say I have SVT.”

Lauren’s diagnosis was reached after a Holter monitor captured her heart racing at 220 beats per minute. Dr. Byrne referred Lauren to Dr. McCanta to discuss treatment options, which included anti-arrhythmic medications or an ablation procedure.  After reviewing their options carefully, the Flotmans decided to pursue ablation.

For Lauren’s ablation, Dr. McCanta used a new technology called an intracardiac echocardiogram, or ICE, to create a three-dimensional map of the inside of her heart without using fluoroscopy (X-Ray radiation), enabling a catheter to apply radiofrequency energy to the precise location in her heart causing her SVT.

ICE technology involves a tiny ultrasound probe imbedded into a catheter that is advanced through the vein directly into the heart, allowing for very clear, accurate image quality. These ultrasound images then integrate with a three-dimensional electroanatomical mapping system, which acts like a GPS (global positioning system) for the catheters within patients’ hearts, to provide an accurate real-time shell of the inside of the patient’s heart. This allows the doctor to safely move catheters inside the beating heart without using radiation.

electrophysiology
Dr. McCanta and the electrophysiology team at CHOC were among the first in the world to routinely utilize intracardiac echocardiography in pediatric and adolescent patients.

While radiofrequency ablation has become a safe and common treatment for SVT in children and adolescents since the mid-2000s, intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) has not traditionally been used in pediatrics due to the large-sized catheters. But when a smaller catheter was created, which was more suitable for the size of young patients, Dr. McCanta and the electrophysiology team from the CHOC Children’s Heart Institute were among the first in the world to routinely utilize the new technology in pediatric and adolescent patients.

“For a young, healthy patient like Lauren, increasing safety and minimizing the use of radiation are extremely important, while still being able to provide a cure for her arrhythmia with ablation” says Dr. McCanta.

After a few days of taking it easy following the procedure, Lauren felt back to her usual self – only without the constant fear her heart would suddenly begin racing.

electrophysiology
Lauren’s longtime arrhythmia has been repaired and her quality of life has dramatically improved, thanks to the electrophysiology team at CHOC.

“Our team loves utilizing advanced technologies like ICE and three-dimensional mapping to help children, adolescents, and young adults with heart rhythm problems,” says Dr. McCanta, “Seeing patients like Lauren get back to all of the things they love doing is why we do this!”

Since the procedure, Lauren has been vocal at church to educate her peers about being conscious and vocal about their health.


Get the facts about CHOC's advanced electrophysiology program



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Why One Mom Is Thankful for CHOC This Year

By Karen Stapleton, CHOC parent and mom of Noah

Happy Thanksgiving! My name is Karen Stapleton, and my son Noah is a patient at CHOC Children’s. As I prepare to celebrate the holidays with my family, I’m grateful we can be together since we have so much to celebrate. I’m also grateful for Noah’s many doctors and nurses at CHOC because without them, my son wouldn’t be alive.

Noah’s birth story

When I was 29 weeks pregnant with Noah, we learned that he had Down syndrome. Another prenatal ultrasound showed an abnormality in his heart, and we were referred to Dr. Pierangelo Renella, a pediatric cardiologist at CHOC, who diagnosed Noah with tetralogy of fallot, a serious heart defect that causes poor oxygenated blood flow from the heart to the rest of the body. I was scared, but having been a CHOC patient myself as a child, I knew my son would be in good hands.

Karen and Noah in the NICU, shortly after Noah was born
Karen and Noah in the NICU, shortly after Noah was born

On July 27 of last year our lives changed forever— Noah was born! I chose to deliver at St. Joseph Hospital in Orange so that my son could be as close to CHOC as possible. When he was born, there were so many doctors and nurses around. I saw Noah quickly enough to give him a kiss before he was whisked away to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at CHOC.

Shortly after birth, Noah’s care team also diagnosed him with Apert syndrome, a genetic disorder that causes certain bones to fuse early. For Noah, that was his skull, fingers and toes.

 

A series of surgeries begins at 3 days old

Noah’s first surgery happened just three days after he was born. Due to the complexity of Noah’s conditions, the surgery was a team effort from multiple CHOC specialties. Noah’s gastroenterologist Dr. Jeffrey Ho; his team of cardiologists Dr. Renella, Dr. Michael Recto, Dr. Anthony McCanta, and Dr. Gira Morchi; his pulmonologist Dr. Amy Harrison; his otolaryngologist Dr. Felizardo Camilon; and the entire NICU team came together to prepare him and get him through that surgery.

It was a success, and 31 days after he was born, Noah finally came home! Weekly trips back to CHOC’s clinics included visits to gastroenterology, pulmonary, cardiology and craniofacial specialists. It was another team effort to prepare Noah for a second open heart surgery that he would eventually need.

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Noah and his cardiothoracic surgeon, Dr. Richard Gates

But a few weeks later, Noah had respiratory complications, which lead to an emergency open heart surgery at just 2 ½ months old. Thanks to Noah’s cardiothoracic surgeon, Dr. Richard Gates, and Noah’s fighting spirit, he was able to come home shortly after surgery.

Celebrating Christmas at CHOC

Just days before Christmas last year, Noah had to be admitted to CHOC for respiratory failure. It was scary to see my baby sedated for 19 days. Dr. Juliette Hunt, a critical care specialist, recommended that Noah undergo a tracheostomy, where a small opening is made in his windpipe and a tube is inserted to help him breathe. Making a decision like that is hard and scary for a mom, but I had complete trust in Noah’s team, and if they knew it would help Noah breathe easier, then I knew it was the right thing to do.

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Noah celebrated his first Christmas at CHOC

After that, Noah started to thrive. He gained weight and became strong enough for his next open heart surgery with Dr. Gates. After a mere six days in the Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit following this surgery, Noah got to come home again!

Even when Noah is doing well, sometimes it can be scary to care for him when he’s at home. During one of our hospital stays, I confided this fear in one of Noah’s favorite nurses, Karissa. She gave me specific tips on what to do during his tummy time and baths, and gave me the courage to care for my son. She encouraged me, and reminded me that CHOC wouldn’t advise me to do anything that wasn’t safe.

Noah and Karissa, a registered nurse at CHOC

Noah’s first birthday

All of this is a lot for a little baby to go through before his first birthday, but Noah has always surprised us and pulled through. Celebrating his first birthday meant more than celebrating his first year of life; it meant celebrating every fight Noah had won over the last year, and it meant appreciating a milestone that at times we thought we might never reach. We decided a super hero theme was perfect for his party because we think of Noah as our little super hero.

Noah celebrating his first birthday

After his birthday, Noah continued to flourish and grow! He started rolling over and actively playing, and he has not stopped smiling.

This progress allowed us to prepare for his next major surgery, a frontal orbital advancement, to reshape his skull and forehead that has fused too early due to Apert syndrome.

Before surgery could begin, the doctors needed to cut Noah’s hair to make a safe incision in his skull. We marked another one of Noah’s milestones at CHOC— his first haircut!

Noah received his very first haircut at CHOC from his neurosurgeon Dr. Michael Muhonen, prior to a skull surgery.
Noah’s very first haircut happened at CHOC. He received it from his neurosurgeon Dr. Michael Muhonen, prior to skull surgery.

With the expertise of his neurosurgeon Dr. Michael Muhonen and his plastic surgeon Dr. Raj Vyas, and a very short stay in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Noah came home again! After yet another successful surgery at CHOC, his brain can now continue to grow.

Noah has more hurdles and additional surgeries ahead of him, but even with how much he’s fought, he continues to smile. He’s not cranky and he doesn’t cry. He’s enjoying every single day he gets to be here – and that’s the life he has taught me to live too.

If Noah’s care team ever needs a reminder of why they do what you do, I tell them: My son would not be here today if it were not for each and every one of them here at CHOC. And for that, my family will be forever grateful.

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