Activity ideas for kids during COVID-19

During the COVID-19 pandemic, many children are spending more time at home than usual. Here’s a roundup of what parents and caregivers can do to keep kids occupied during this time.

Online learning

    • The Orange County Department of Education has created a roundup of free resources to help students supplement other materials that are being provided by their teachers.
    • Many educational companies are offering free subscriptions in light of school closures. Here’s a guide.
    • Scholastic offers day-by-day projects to keep kids reading, thinking and growing.
    • PBS SoCal | KCET, in partnership with the Los Angeles Unified School District and in collaboration with California PBS stations, are offering broadcast programming and accompanying digital resources that adhere to California’s state curriculum. Learn more here.
    • Budding scientists can access Nova Labs at PBS, for video, animation and games on scientific topics like predicting solar storms and constructing renewable energy systems.
    • NASA’s Teachable Moments, offers a range of activities and lessons for grades K-12.
    • NASA’s Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex has educational and fun Facebook videos where kids can learn from astronauts and other educators. For activities, instructions are available as free downloads.
    • Make any room a classroom with BrainPop, where curious learners can take units in science, social studies, math, engineering and tech, and more
    • Tynker is offering free premium coding courses during school closures.
    • Khan Academy offers free daily schedules for kids and teens ages 4-18 to keep stability and routine during this time. The online learning non-profit also offers a free downloadable app called Khan Academy Kids,that contains thousands of activities and books for children ages 2-7.
    • FunBrain.com offers hundreds of free games, books comics and videos for Pre-K through eighth grade.
    • National Geographic Kids offers free online quizzes on topics ranging from animals to planets to sports and food.
    • Cool Math 4 Kids offers games and lessons to make math fun for kids.
    • Math Game Time offers a variety of games, videos and worksheets for Pre-K through seventh grade.
    • Inspired by Dr. Seuss, Seussville has activities, crafts, printables and recipes to engage your child in playful learning.
    • Online  games that include K-12 curriculum.
    • Skillshare is offering two-month free trials for online classes that include animation, creative writing, web design and more.
    • Amazon is offering free computer science courses online for various grade levels.

YouTube channels

  • Camp YouTube — a digital learning experience to help parents recreate the fun of summer camp at home.  Summer camp themes include arts, adventure, sports, STEM and more
  • Crash Course Kids — bi-weekly shows on grade school science, including Earth, habitats, space and more.
  • Science Channel – learn about outer space, new technology and more.
  • SciShow Kids – the hosts explain fun, complex science concepts; do experiments and interview experts.
  • National Geographic Kids – videos feature animals, science, pets and more.
  • Free School – exposure to famous art, classical music, children’s literature and natural science in an age-appropriate and kid-accessible way.
  • GEOgraphy Focus – explore geography, maps, flags, culture, languages and travel.
  • TheBrainScoop – explore the work and research of natural history museums.
  • Kids Learning Tube – educate kids through music and animation.
  • Geek Gurl Diaries – videos on programming, computer science, logic, electronics and more.
  • Mike Likes Science – science-inspired music videos.
  • Science Max – large-scale science experiments.
  • SoulPancake – in addition to the well-known Kid President shows, this channels offers content that explores and celebrates the ways humans seek connection.
  • Course Hero – study guides and videos for various subject matters.

Story time

  • Here’s a list of podcasts — featuring stories, meditation, music and more — for ages 2 through 6.
  • Celebrities are taking to social media to read children’s books to little ones staying home during this time. The Los Angeles Times curated this roundup of these posts.
  • Audible, which has the world’s largest collection of audio books, is offering free stories — in six different languages —  for kids as long as schools are closed. Start listening here.
  • Here’s a list of authors doing read-alouds of their famous books, as well as books by their favorite authors.
  • Storyline Online, the SAG-AFTRA Foundation’s award-winning children’s literacy website, streams videos of celebrities reading aloud children’s books alongside creatively produced illustrations.

Music class

  • Carnegie Hall’s Music Explorer program offers a way to learn new musical genres and cultural traditions. Courses conclude in an interactive concert experience.
  • Chrome Music Lab lets kids learn music through a hands-on website.

Learn a new language

  • Learn a new language with Duolingo.
  • English52 allows users to strengthen English skills through video lessons and activities.
  • Fabulingua is an interactive app that teaches Spanish.

Virtual field trips

  • Google Arts & Culture has partnered with thousands of museums around the world to offer virtual tours from the comfort of your home. Here’s the complete list.
  • The San Diego Zoo offers 10 different webcams so animal lovers can keep up with a variety of their favorite creatures.
  • The Monterey Bay Aquarium also offers 10 different webcams for families to experience underwater life from anywhere.

Cook with your kids

  • CHOC nutrition experts have curated some of their favorite recipes and offer tips for how to get kids involved in the kitchen. “Children as young as 2 years old can help out in the kitchen. You can have your child wash fruits and vegetables or stir ingredients,” Shonda Brown, CHOC clinical dietitian, says. “Children are more open to trying new foods if they have opportunities to explore and learn about the food before they eat it.”

Opt outside

Kids can still benefit from nature while practicing proper social distancing. Even babies and toddlers can join a family nature walk. if you’re in a public space, keep them in a carrier or a stroller. If you’re in your backyard, they can explore more freely.

Children who spend more time outdoors have improved motor development and lower obesity rates. Playing outside promotes more curiosity, creativity, and critical thinking — especially essential with schools closed and extra-curricular activities canceled.

  • On a nature walk, collect twigs, leaves or rocks. Then, build a nature sculpture by sticking these items in play dough. Help your child notice the patterns created by different items.
  • Go on a family bike ride, while keeping a safe distance from others.
  • Nature scavenger hunts can be fun for the whole family. How many different kinds of plants, flowers, animals or birds can you see?
  • Playing soccer or catch is fine, but don’t share equipment with people outside your household.

Highlights@Home

The beloved classic kids’ magazine, Highlights, is posting frequent roundups of stories, puzzles, craft ideas and more to help children cope with being cooped up and help parents make the most of this time with their kids. Each installment has a different theme:

  • Celebrate reading — Reading can transport us somewhere else for a while, even when we’re stuck at home.
  • Pajama day — Showing your children affection with a hug, snuggling on the couch to watch a movie, or reading together in a cozy blanket tent are all ways you can be fully present with your child.
  • A never-ending pile of fun — Sequestering at home may actually provide you with the time to teach kids tasks like matching socks, folding clothes, and putting away clean laundry. Kids usually like to help, and when we make the chores fun, they’re often eager to pitch in.
  • We are (all) family — Whatever your family configuration, this week’s issue has ideas for strengthening your family bond.
  • Staying connected — Children are likely feeling the loss of connection with friends and extended family. This guide is full of ways you can help your kids feel more connected to people they love but can’t safely see right now.
  • Just keep dancing — What raises our spirits more or gives us a burst of energy like music and dance? These activities will help  your kids move their bodies, use their creativity, and improve their mood.
  • Shoot for the stars — Young or old, we’re all fascinated by space. What’s known is often mind-boggling, and what’s unknown leaves so much to the imagination.
  • Thank you teachers — Thanking teachers is not only a nice thing to do, but showing appreciation is a simple but important practice of gratitude.
  • Hooray for helpers — National Nurses Week presents an opportunity to expand your kids’ understanding of what it means to be heroic.
  • Let’s talk family — Someday, this quarantine will be a memory, and we hope your children will remember some of the family fun you’ve been enabling, and also the ways you are helping them focus on the things that really matter.
  • Cleaning up — A bundle of resources for making cleanup fun.
  • Celebrate the sun — Puzzles, stories, and activities related to growing gardens, having picnics, and taking nature hikes will remind your kids of some of the fun to be had in the sun. Sunny days together provide an opportunity to talk to your kids about optimism.
  • Alone together — Games, played alone or together, are great for practicing reading, math, and strategic thinking. They also help build memory, focus and interpersonal skills.
  • Soar into summer — Activity ideas to help imaginations take flight.
  • We’re going on a scavenger hunt — Encourage children to sharpen their powers of discovery and plan their own hunt.
  • Be nice, be kind, be you — Reinforce the messages of being sensitive to others’ feelings and that kindness is never wasted.
  • Blaze a trail — Ideas on connecting with nature, sparking creativity and thinking of others.
  • Be the best BFF — Cultivating friendships helps foster kids’ social-emotional development. The qualities we seek in friends—kindness, positivity and shared interests—are found in friends who  may look like us, or in those who may look different.
  • Celebrate your superpower — This bundle will help your children see themselves as having the ideas and abilities —superpowers, if you will — to do good in the world.
  • Pack a picnic — Menu and game ideas that will let kids show off their creativity.
  • Camp out or camp in — Ideas for making a backyard or living room campground memorable.
  • Welcome to summer — Activity and bonding ideas to promote relaxation, enjoyment and memory making.

Programming to help explain COVID-19 to kids

  • This CNN/Sesame Street town hall offers reminders on how children can help protect themselves against COVID-19.
  • PBS KIDS aired a special episode of Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood that addressed challenges and disappointments children and their families may be facing during the COVID-19 pandemic. Learn more here.

Other activities

This article was last updated on Jan. 22, 2021.

Get more information on Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Related posts:

Celebrating winter holidays during COVID

With the holiday season in full swing, and COVID-19 cases rising both in our community and around the country, families are making plans to observe their favorite traditions in a much different way than in years past. CHOC experts provide the following recommendations for how to celebrate the winter holidays safely amid COVID-19.

“The holiday season – filled with celebrations and family traditions – can be such a magical time for kids. We want all families to enjoy quality, happy time together, but it’s essential that these celebrations are done in a safe way,” says Melanie Patterson, CHOC’s vice president of patient care services and chief nursing officer. “We understand some people are experiencing “COVID fatigue” after months of juggling remote learning, working from home and other measures in place in our communities. But now is the time to be as vigilant as ever in doing our part to curb the spread of COVID-19.”

These recommendations are meant to supplement, rather than replace, any local or statewide regulations.

Celebrate with your household

The safest way to celebrate the holidays this year is to celebrate with people in your own household. Travel and gatherings with family and friends outside your household can increase your chances of getting or spreading COVID-19 or the flu.

Celebrate virtually with others

Use technology such as FaceTime, Zoom or Skype to enjoy a holiday meal or gift exchange with loved ones who don’t live in your household. Consider sharing recipes between family members and friends ahead of time, and cooking each of your meals together over video chat. Even Santa Claus is offering virtual visits this year!

Children can also use video chat to do a festive craft project with cousins and friends outside their household.

Set up a virtual cookie decorating or gingerbread house building party with neighbors, friends or loved ones from outside your household.

Or, have a virtual, interactive watch party for your favorite holiday movie using Netflix Party or Disney+’s GroupWatch. These services allow you to synchronize your show or movie with friends and family, and chat while you’re watching.

Celebrating virtually is especially important if you are celebrating with family members over the age of 65, or those who are immunocompromised and have underlying conditions that put them at greater risk of complications from COVID-19.

You can also make crafts or cookies as a family and deliver them to neighbors, friends and family in a safe way, such as leaving them on their doorstep.

Festive outdoor celebrations

As temperatures begin to dip in Southern California, be sure to dress warmly before engaging in any physically distant outdoor activities. Consider a nature scavenger hunt, hiking or taking a drive through a neighborhood near you that is decked out in holiday lights and décor.

Holiday travel

Traveling can increase your chance of getting or spreading COVID-19. Staying home is the best way to protect yourself and your family.

The California Department of Public Health issued a travel advisory Nov. 13, urging visitors to California or residents returning home from non-essential travel to self-quarantine for 14 days and limit their interactions to their immediate household, in order to slow the spread of COVID-19. California also announced on Dec. 3 regional stay-at-home orders, which can be triggered by a region’s intensive care unit (ICU) bed capacity falling below 15%. Read more about this regional stay-at-home order, including how it impacts travel.

Add a flu shot to your to-do list

Your flu shot is more important than ever this year. Influenza and COVID-19 can have over-lapping symptoms. They also utilize the same resources, including personal protective equipment (PPE), hospital beds and equipment. Protecting yourself – and your family – from the flu can help limit a potential strain on these resources. Learn more about the importance of this year’s influenza vaccine.

Navigating holiday disappointment

By this point in the COVID-19 pandemic, many children have experienced disappointment about missing out on birthday parties, family vacations or special occasions they had been looking forward to. If your child or teen feels disappointed right now over missed holiday celebrations, this article from a CHOC pediatric psychologist can help.

Get more information on Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Related posts:

How parents can help kids navigate holiday disappointment during COVID-19

By Dr. Mery Taylor, pediatric psychologist at CHOC

mindfulness
Dr. Mery Taylor, pediatric psychologist at CHOC

By this point in the COVID-19 pandemic, many children have experienced disappointment about missing out on birthday parties, family vacations or special occasions they had been looking forward to. If your child or teen feels disappointed right now over missed holiday celebrations, let her express her feelings, and validate them. Share your own disappointments and how you are managing your feelings.

As a parent, it is difficult to see your child experience disappointment. As adults, we have the perspective of knowing that there will be other holiday seasons in their future. During this time, children will be most comforted by parents’ words of reassurance that you will get through these challenging times together, and that life will return to normal eventually.

Remind children why things have changed

It can be helpful to remind them about why things are different right now. Remind your child that as a community, we are all doing our part to curb the spread of COVID-19

Discuss changes in plans earlier vs. later

For most young children, it will be helpful to start to discuss changes in plans earlier than later. Start slow and return to the topic several times, each time adding a little more detail. Ask for your children’s input on how they would like to spend the holidays given the stay-at-home order and how they might celebrate with loved ones who they cannot see in person. For example, they can help you bake your favorite holiday recipe to drop off on someone’s doorstep or create a special holiday craft to mail to a loved one who lives far away.

Limit children’s exposure to the news

At this point, all but very young children are clear that something has drastically changed in their world. While it is important to keep very young children away from the daily news which can include death tolls and speculations, parents should be honest about what we are trying to accomplish by social distancing. Here’s an explanation of social distancing. It could be helpful to ask them what they already know, debunk misinformation, and provide additional information for better understanding and clarification.

Let them use their imagination

Have fun thinking about what makeup holiday celebrations and other gatherings with family and friends would look like. Let them use their imaginations on what decorations they would have, food they would eat and people they most want to see.

Celebrate special events in a creative way:

  • Use technology such as FaceTime, Zoom or Skype to enjoy a holiday meal with loved ones who don’t live in your household. Consider sharing recipes between family members and friends ahead of time and cooking your meals together over video chat.
  • Host a virtual party — decorate a backdrop, make a music playlist and create a themed game.
  • Join friends for a virtual cookie or gingerbread house decorating party.
  • Have a virtual, interactive watch party for your favorite holiday movie using Netflix Party or Disney +’s GroupWatch. These services allow you to synchronize your show or movie with friends and family, and chat while you’re watching.
  • If your traditional outings during the holiday season aren’t an option due to COVID-19, consider planning a virtual field trip and inviting families from other households. Many museums and other attractions are offering free virtual visits during this time.
  • Help your child prepare a special meal or dessert for the holiday or special day.
  • Go into nature for a scavenger hunt or take a drive through a holiday light display.
  • Organize a Zoom or Skype call with family and friends to sing your favorite holiday songs.

Building resiliency

Although this pandemic is not the situation that we would have chosen for our kids to face, experiencing adverse events, with their parent’s support, will help kids build resiliency. They will be able to look back on this time and reflect on how they were creative in finding ways to celebrate holidays and how they found new ways to entertain themselves at home, while persevering over new challenges.

Get more information on Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Related posts:

  • Activity ideas for kids during COVID-19
    During the COVID-19 pandemic, many children are spending more time at home than usual. Here’s a roundup of what parents and caregivers can do to keep kids occupied during this ...
  • Celebrating winter holidays during COVID
    With the holiday season in full swing, and COVID-19 cases rising both in our community and around the country, families are making plans to observe their favorite traditions in a ...
  • Tips to foster a happy holiday season for children with autism
    Amid stay-at-home orders, remote learning and other changes caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, many families are faced with finding different ways to celebrate the holiday season than they’ve done in ...

Tips to foster a happy holiday season for children with autism

Amid stay-at-home orders, remote learning and other changes caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, many families are faced with finding different ways to celebrate the holiday season than they’ve done in years past. The holiday season can still be a joyful time of the year. For families with a child who has autism spectrum disorder (ASD), following a few tips from the Thompson Autism Center at CHOC can help ensure everyone enjoys the festivities in their own way.

Activities

Holiday breaks often mean big changes in schedules and routines, which results in things becoming much less predictable. This can often result in the child being more anxious, less able to tolerate frustration, changes in eating/sleeping patterns, as well as impacting a variety of other triggers that may result in challenging behaviors.

To help your child, provide a visual schedule of each day, with start times and end times. Use visual timer apps, “First This Then This” schedules and personalized “social stories” to help prepare for activities. Try to maintain your child’s standard bedtime and mealtime routines.

Decorations

Instead of decorating your entire home all at once, decorate gradually. Look at pictures from previous years to help your child prepare for the change. Avoid overly bright or blinking decorations and strong scented candles. Create a holiday-free zone — such as your child’s room —for your child to come back and use as a “safe place” when necessary.

Gifts

Children with ASD can especially benefit from toys that involve social interaction, encourage turn-taking and build language skills. Give other family members a list of gifts your child might like.

Some children on the spectrum tend to repetitively talk about a gift that they want. To help set boundaries, offer your child three tokens that they can redeem each day to talk about the gift they want.

Opening gifts can be overwhelming for those on the autism spectrum. Video modeling is an evidence-based way to teach your child what to expect and how to behave. Take a video of family members opening presents, taking turns and saying, “Thank you,” and watch the video several times in advance. Also consider wrapping something familiar if your child does not enjoy opening new presents.

Traditions

Choose a tradition that is important for you and your family. Try not to get caught up with keeping old traditions. Create your own family traditions that follow COVID-19 safety precautions and are easy and fun for everyone, like decorating the house or tree using your child’s preferred items and participating in sensory-friendly programs.

“There are many ways to help your child cope with the hustle and bustle of the holiday season,” says Dr. Jina Jang, pediatric psychologist at the Thompson Autism Center at CHOC. “The most important thing to remember is that your child will enjoy the holidays in their own way, even if it’s different from how others enjoy them.”

Explore the Thompson Autism Center at CHOC Children's

Related posts:

Mental health tips during COVID-19

For many of us, the COVID-19 pandemic has created a fluid environment that has forced us to adapt to countless changes in many areas of our lives – school, work, activities and socialization, to name a few. In this roundup, mental health experts from CHOC offer their go-to mental health tips during COVID for family members of all ages.

Idea: Track your G-R-A-P-E-S

Submitted by: Dr. Francesca Bahn, pediatric psychologist

I like to use G-R-A-P-E-S tracking calendars to help with mood stability and management that doesn’t require intensive therapy. This stands for:

  • G Gentle to self
  • R Relaxation
  • A Accomplishment
  • P Pleasure
  • E Exercise
  • S Socialization

Kids can create a calendar or download one online that tracks days of the week on one axis and each “grape” along the other axis. They should place a sticker in each box when they engage in that activity for the day.

Idea: Look for ways to stay kind, created and connected during COVID-19

Submitted by: Dr. Adrianne Alpern, pediatric psychologist

Kids for Peace is a non-profit organization that works to create peace through service, global friendships and acts of kindness. I recommend their activities to many families who I work with, who have found them to be really helpful.  Some of my favorite activities include:

  • Make peace rocks — paint rocks with kind words and place them around town to delight your neighbors.
  • Harvest seeds from fruits and replant them.
  • Discover something new about a different culture or a different country.
  • Listen to music from different parts of the world.
  • Pick at least one country from each continent and discover their favorite food or dish.
  • Create an acts of kindness checklist and complete as many items as possible from home.
  • Create a family vision board to track your dreams and goals

Idea: Activities to help boost your mood

Submitted by: Paloma Bautista, licensed clinical social worker

  • Arts and crafts — Paint your favorite quote on a canvas and hang it in your bedroom or a common area. Or, gather old magazines and create a collage with short-term goals and positive quotes.
  • Journaling — Practice journaling by writing three to five positive things that happened today, and/or explore your personal strengths and add them in your journal.
  • Exercise — Go on a short 10-15 minute “mind-full’ walk with a loved one from your household. Incorporate your five senses. Identify five things you can see, four things you can feel, three things you can hear, two things you can smell and one thing you can taste
  • Movie — Watch your favorite or perhaps a new holiday movie with a loved one. Take turns after the movie talking about your favorite part.
  • Baking — Bake your favorite holiday treat or learn to bake a popular family dish.

Idea: A new way to ask and answer, “Are you OK?”

Submitted by: Liz Hawkins, CHOC volunteer and mental health advocate

One simple check-in I heard that really resonated with me was from managers at Dell beginning team meeting asking team members, “Are you above the line or below the line?” It gives you the opportunity not to delve too personally if you don’t want to with your co-workers but at the same time that shorthand gives people a snapshot that things may not be great today. I think this could also apply with teens and with others in your life that don’t always want to go into detail but for whom you want to know how they are really doing.

Idea: Window swap

Submitted by: Liz Hawkins, CHOC volunteer and mental health advocate

WindowSwap is a beautiful website that allows you to escape mentally to someone else’s view outside their window — all around the word — even if for just a few moments. When our travel is limited, this is a great way to escape our current reality and gaze upon someone else’s for a while.

Idea: Draw it out

Submitted by: Liz Hawkins, CHOC volunteer and mental health advocate

Drawing mundane household objects using prompts – like the ones in Believer magazine – forces us to look at these everyday objects in a different way. These activities are great for kids and adults alike.

Idea: Self-care comics

Submitted by: Liz Hawkins, CHOC volunteer and mental health advocate

Creating your own comic can be a way to track emotions, and visualize yourself in soothing situations. These prompts from Believer magazine are my favorite:

  • What am I grateful for today?
  • What is out of my control today?
  • What is in my control today?
  • What can I do for my body today?
  • How will I (safely) connect to other humans today?
  • Think of your safe, no-stress zone/place and draw it.

Idea: Make your own self-care kit

Submitted by: Liz Hawkins, CHOC volunteer and mental health advocate

Similar to the idea of a coping box, self-care kits might include physical items such as a white noise machine, puzzle or your favorite lotion, or intangible options like reminders to relax your muscles, get outdoors or reminders to take to-do lists one step at a time.

This is a good reminder that it’s OK for self-care to be “boring.” Social media can lead us to believe that self-care equates to luxurious bubble baths or nice meals, but to can really be as simple as setting aside time to read a book or magazine, taking a shower or changing your sheets.

Idea: Repeat mantras

Submitted by: Liz Hawkins, CHOC volunteer and mental health advocate

I repeat these sayings to myself often. These might help you, too – or maybe you’ll find your own phrases that resonate most with you:

  • Relate. Reason.
  • You’ve made it through 100% of your bad days.
  • Wake up intentionally. Work intentionally. Eat intentionally. And rest intentionally.

Idea: Coping cards

Submitted by: Liz Hawkins, CHOC volunteer and mental health advocate

Coping Skills for Kids has an online store that offers customizable workbooks and coping skills cue cards. Children can get cards to focus on distraction, calming, processing or physical activities.

Idea: Write it down; tear it up

Submitted by: Joni Rogers, mental health assistant, Cherese Mari Laulhere Mental Health Inpatient Center

If kids are struggling with a parent, friend or situation and they haven’t found the words or strength to talk to them, I have them write it down on a piece of paper and then tear it up when they are done. It’s double gratifying to be able to put your thoughts, feelings and emotions down but also be able to tear it up and help put the past behind you.

Idea: Plan fun moments

Submitted by: Michael Ketterer, interim nurse manager, Cherese Mari Laulhere Mental Health Inpatient Center

The biggest tip I can give coming from a father of six kids in the middle of this crazy pandemic is to plan fun moments into your week. Having something planned to look forward to that your children really enjoy can help them push through the times they don’t enjoy. My wife is so good at doing this; she basically plans fun moments into every day. It doesn’t have to be big – it can be a favorite desert, board game, movie, or going for a walk around the reservoir in our neighborhood. In warmer seasons we would plan a safe beach day or drive up to the mountains to play in the snow. We always have family movie night once a week.

Idea: Question Jenga

Submitted by: Dr. Sheila Modir, pediatric psychologist

Label Jenga pieces with fun and engaging questions, so when the child pulls on that block piece, they answer that question. Also label some pieces with “feeling” words like brave, sad or happy, and have them provide a time they have felt that way. You can give a prize for the most “labeled” pieces a person has so there can be two ways to win the game — whoever doesn’t knock all the pieces over, and whoever has the most labeled pieces — to reinforce getting a labeled piece.

Idea: Sunday family meetings

Submitted by: Dr. Sheila Modir, pediatric psychologist

Have family meetings every Sunday night to review the plan for the week ahead, anything coming up in the family agenda, check in with everyone, and end with a fun family board game. This helps get children ready for the week and can be a source of predictability amid a chaotic and unpredictable time.

This article was updated Dec. 10, 2020

Stay Informed about Mental Health

CHOC Children’s has made the commitment to take a leadership role in meeting the need for more mental health services in Orange County. Sign up today to keep informed about this important initiative and to receive tips and education from mental health experts.

Related posts: