CHOC resident follows in his father’s footsteps

Growing up, Tim Hicks fondly remembers seeing his dad come home from work with a smile. Despite his demanding job as physician, his dad, David, always remained positive and shared countless rewarding stories that he witnessed at the hospital.

It was that unwavering dedication that inspired Tim, now a chief resident at CHOC Children’s and UC Irvine, to pursue a career in medicine.

“Seeing how happy my dad has been, I wanted to be part of that,” he says.

As long as he can remember, Tim was interested in medicine. He was a curious child and enjoyed science and learning about the human body.

Similarly, his dad, Dr. David Hicks, a pulmonologist and neonatologist at CHOC for more than 40 years, had always been interested in medicine as well. David wanted to become a veterinarian initially, like his own father, but eventually went to medical school.

During his long and successful tenure at CHOC, David has enjoyed seeing the hospital’s growth and working alongside a compassionate and dedicated team.

“What’s most inspiring at CHOC is the desire of our nurses and doctors to treat their patients as if they were their own children. That, and when I see the smiles on parents’ faces when their kids get better, is what inspires me to continue to do this,” says the 74-year-old physician.

It’s that same drive that motivates Tim to follow in his dad’s footsteps.

“I really enjoy treating and hanging out with kids. They manage to smile even in a very difficult time. Their light-heartedness and innocent outlook are refreshing in many ways,” Tim says.

Tim’s relationship with CHOC goes back even further, however. His dad recalls the time when Tim, a teen then, was admitted to CHOC to be treated for a splenic fracture.

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Dr. Hicks with his son Tim at his white coat ceremony, where residents receive their white coats for the first time.

“Little did we know then that he would be back as a pediatric resident one day,” David says. “It was a few scary days in the PICU. Moments like that teach you that life is precious and that things can change very quickly.”

Tim completed his pediatric residency in July 2019 and became a board-certified pediatrician. His goal now is to go into pediatric pulmonary medicine, like his father.

“Pulmonary was one of my last rotations in residency, and I fell in love with it,” Tim says. “I guess I’m following my father’s footsteps even more closely now!”

Reflecting on his years as a resident, he knew becoming chief resident was the natural next step in his journey.

“I wanted to be a chief resident because I love the CHOC residency program. It’s an extra year where I take on more of an administrator role, a position that allows me to help make important improvements to our already wonderful program.”

Along with meetings, scheduling, seminars and other responsibilities that come along with the role, Tim appreciates the chance to become a teacher.

“The Chief Resident position is unique; as a liaison between the residents and administrators, I try to be the residents’ voice and empower them while getting insight into the workings of a large program of 90 residents working at three hospitals. Because of this, I will become a better teacher, communicator and leader.”

Both Tim and David point to CHOC as an ideal place for budding doctors to learn. Between a diverse patient population and a wide variety of cases, residents can expect to be challenged.

“Training at CHOC gives us a wealth of knowledge,” Tim says. “It’s a great foundation for any pediatric career that residents decide to pursue, whether it is general pediatrics or subspecialty medicine. The attendings at CHOC are wonderful, approachable and eager to teach. They really help foster a CHOC family atmosphere that feels very special to be a part of.”

Seeing his father work at CHOC for more than four decades has given Tim a unique perspective about what it means to be part of the CHOC family.

“As his son and as a former CHOC patient, I have learned how special the patient-physician relationship is. To be a physician and serve in the community I grew up in is something few people are lucky enough to experience.”

For Tim, that means occasionally encountering familiar faces.

“Some of the most special moments in residency have been when I have helped take care of my father’s patients,” Tim says.

It reinforces the impact of his dad’s work when those former patients – now parents of their own children – remember Dr. David Hicks fondly.

“My dad has given me great advice and taught me to treat each patient as a person – that it’s important to take care of their unique, individual needs with care and compassion.”

Tim – or “Hicks 2.0,” as he jokingly refers to himself – couldn’t be prouder to follow his dad’s path.

“My dad is an incredible role model and friend. I’m not only thankful for his guidance in life but also in medicine,” he says.

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