CHOC Included Among Nation’s Best Children’s Hospitals in U.S. News Survey

CHOC Children’s has been named one of the nation’s best children’s hospitals by U.S. News & World Report in its 2017-18 Best Children’s Hospitals rankings.

CHOC ranked in seven specialties: cancer, diabetes/endocrinology, neonatology, neurology/neurosurgery, orthopedics, pulmonology and urology, which earned a top 20 spot on the coveted list.

According to U.S. News, the Best Children’s Hospitals rankings were introduced in 2007 to help families of children with rare or life-threatening illnesses find the best medical care available.

The 11th annual rankings recognize the top 50 pediatric facilities across the United States in 10 pediatric specialties.

The U.S. News Best Children’s Hospitals rankings rely on clinical data and on an annual survey of pediatric specialists. The rankings methodology considers clinical outcomes, such as mortality and infection rates, efficiency and coordination of care delivery and compliance with “best practices.”

“At CHOC Children’s, we are steadfastly committed to delivering high-quality, safe and reliable health care to our patients,” said Dr. James Cappon, CHOC’s chief quality officer. “Recognition from U.S. News of our excellence in these seven subspecialties validates our efforts, but also provides our patients and families with even more assurance of our commitment to excelling in all areas of care.”

“The pediatric centers we rank in Best Children’s Hospitals deliver exceptionally high-quality care and deserve to be recognized for their commitment,” U.S. News Health Rankings Editor Avery Comarow said. “Children with life-threatening illnesses or rare conditions need the state-of-the-art services and expertise these hospitals provide every day.”

Learn more about survival rates, adequacy of nurse staffing, procedure and patient volume, availability of programs for particular illnesses and conditions and more. 

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Living with Diabetes: One Child’s Perspective

In honor of American Diabetes Month, CHOC Children’s patient Ava Hata sheds insight on living with the disease. Ava, who is 11, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes when she was just 18 months old. She and her mom Rebekah, who founded TIDModsquad, are active advocates for patients and families, with Ava striving to be a positive role model for others.

How did you learn to manage your disease?

I remember the first time I pricked myself. I was about 4 years old, and I hated being dependent on other people to prick my finger. I snuck into my bedroom and did it based on what I had observed my parents doing. After that day, the momentum of learning to do it all by myself really took off. And now, after living with Type 1 diabetes for many years, I have an instinct for what I need to do. And while it may seem absurd at times, my instinct has worked in my favor. I have learned what to do and when to do it.

What do you like about your CHOC team?

I love being treated at CHOC by its endocrinology and diabetes team. The nurses are a pleasure to talk to, and Dr. Reh is the best!  She is and always will be my favorite endocrinologist. She’s been taking great care of me since I was little.

What are your hobbies?

I love being around animals. I ride horses and train diabetic alert dogs. I have my self-trained diabetic alert dog, Bruin, who has opened so many doors of opportunity. One cool moment was when I took my dog to see Dr. Bhangoo and got to spend time telling him how Bruin gives alerts on my highs and lows.

tips for kids with Type 1 diabetes
CHOC patient Ava and her self-trained diabetic alert dog, Bruin, share tips for kids with Type 1 diabetes.

In addition to training, I love to show dogs. Other interests include history and literature, as well as building all sorts of objects, from playhouses to terrariums.

How do you manage pursuing all of your interests in spite of living with a chronic condition, and what advice do you have for others?

Honestly, I believe you will always find a way to do what you love. Just keep walking forward, and everything will work out.

What else would you want people to know about living with diabetes?

First of all, people need to understand that it’s not simple and although you think there is a “control” with diabetes, there isn’t — and won’t be until there’s a cure. I’d also really like people to know that I am just like them in the sense that each of us has our differences, including responsibilities. It’s important to accept others and not discriminate against them.

I also want people to know there are numerous support groups, including the one my mom and I founded. It’s nice to connect with others who are going through something similar. You become an instant family!

tips for kids with Type 1 diabetes
Ava and her self-trained diabetic alert dog Bruin.

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U.S. News Names CHOC One of the Nation’s Best Children’s Hospitals

From treating the most complicated cases of epilepsy and repairing complex urological conditions, to curing cancer and saving premature lives, CHOC Children’s physicians and staff are committed to delivering the highest levels of safe, quality care. That commitment has earned CHOC its most recent accolade:  inclusion on the coveted U.S. News & World Report’s Best Children’s Hospitals rankings.   CHOC ranked in eight specialties: cancer, neonatology, neurology/neurosurgery, pulmonology, orthopedics, gastroenterology and GI surgery, diabetes and endocrinology, and urology, which earned a “top 25” spot.

U.S. news

According to U.S. News, the Best Children’s Hospitals rankings are intended to help parents determine where to get the best medical care for their children. The rankings highlight the top 50 U.S. pediatric facilities in 10 specialties, from cancer to urology. Of the 183 participating medical centers, only 78 hospitals ranked in at least one specialty. For its list, U.S. News relies on extensive clinical and operational data, including survival rates, clinic and procedure volume, infection control measures and outcomes, which can be viewed at http://health.usnews.com/best-hospitals/pediatric-rankings. An annual survey of pediatric specialists accounts for 15 percent of participants’ final scores.

“The Best Children’s Hospitals highlight the pediatric centers that offer exceptional care for the kids who need the most help,” says U.S. News Health Rankings Editor Avery Comarow. “Day in and day out, they offer state-of-the-art medical care.”

Dr. James Cappon, chief quality and patient safety officer at CHOC, points to the survey as an invaluable tool for him and his colleagues to evaluate programs and services, determining best practices, and making plans for the immediate and long-term future.

“CHOC is certainly honored to be recognized once again by U.S. News. But our dedication to serving the best interests of the children and families in our community is what truly drives us to pursue excellence in everything we do. Our scores, especially in the areas of patient-and-family-centered care, commitment to best practices, infection prevention, breadth and scope of specialists and services, and health information technology, for example, reflect our culture of providing the very best care to our patients,” explains Dr. Cappon. To hear more about CHOC’s commitment to patient safety and quality care—and what parents need to know— listen to this podcast.

CHOC’s culture of excellence has it earned it numerous accolades, including being named, multiple times, a Leapfrog Top Hospital. Additional recent honors include the gold-level CAPE Award from the California Council of Excellence; Magnet designation for nursing; gold-level Beacon Award for Excellence, a distinction earned twice by CHOC’s pediatric intensive care unit team; “Most Wired Hospital”; and The Advisory Board Company’s 2016 Workplace Transformation Award and Workplace of the Year Award. Inspiring the best in her team, CHOC’s President and CEO Kimberly Chavalas Cripe was recently named a winner of the EY Entrepreneur of the Year Award in the “Community Contributions” category.

Sisters Create Diabetes App to Help Patients Communicate with Caregivers

After living with Type I diabetes for most of their childhood, Reece and Olivia Ohmer were already well-versed in educating their family about how they were feeling and caring for themselves. But both girls eventually became bogged down by responding to frequent and complex check-ins and reminders from parents and caregivers, and knew other kids with diabetes likely felt the same. Looking for a better way to communicate with their parents and physicians, the sisters created a diabetes emoticon app, which they are presenting to pediatric specialists, researchers and other health professionals during the Young Innovator Workshop of the Pediatrics 2040 conference hosted by CHOC Children’s.

A mockup of the diabetes emoticon app in development.
A mockup of the diabetes emoticon app in development.

Reece and Olivia created a variety of illustrations to easily answer the most common questions and text messages patients may receive from their parents. For example, if a parent texts “Did you test your blood sugar? Did you have a snack?” the child could quickly and easily reply with emoticons showing a blood glucose meter and a snack.

A student group at the University of Michigan called the “Michigan Hackers” is developing and testing the app, which they hope to make available on iTunes in the first quarter of 2016.

The Ohmer’s Journey

The Ohmer family has had an interesting journey with diabetes. Olivia, the youngest member of the family of four, was diagnosed with the disease when she was three years old. At the time, her older sister Reece would hold her hand during every insulin injection. Three years later, Reece was diagnosed with the same disease.

“When we had our first diagnosis, I didn’t know where our lives were going to go,” says mom Amy. “Instead of taking the situation and looking at it as a burdensome way to live, Olivia and Reece have taken their diagnoses and have done something remarkable.”

The pair has big plans for the future.  In addition to rolling out their diabetes emoticon app, each hopes to pursue a career in the medical field. Reece hopes to go into pediatric medicine to help other kids, while Olivia is interested in becoming a researcher.

“We haven’t found the cure for diabetes yet, so if nobody else can find it, then I want to do it,” she said.

The sisters hope to empower other patients to help one another, Reece added.

“Just because we’re kids doesn’t mean we don’t have good ideas.”

Learn more about other young innovators involved in CHOC’s Pediatrics 2040 Conference.

S.M.A.R.T.I.E.S. Class Helps Kids Manage Type 1 Diabetes

According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), nearly 30 million children and adults in the United States have diabetes. Diabetes is a metabolic disease in which the body’s inability to produce any or enough insulin causes elevated levels of glucose in the blood.

CHOC Children’s endocrinology and diabetes team provides comprehensive diagnosis and treatment of endocrine disorders, including innovative programs and classes designed to enhance the quality of life for patients. S.M.A.R.T.I.E.S. (Smart Kids/Teens Managing and Regulating their Insulin, Exercise and Sugars), a special class that provides education to newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes patients at CHOC, features interactive activities and learning techniques for different ages. Additionally, the class provides an opportunity for patients to bond with other patients with diabetes. The patient’s siblings and parents are also encouraged to attend.

As part of CHOC’s diabetes new onset education program, which is accredited by the ADA, the class helps support better outcomes and management of this life-changing condition.

The experts at CHOC offer the following holiday eating tips for parents of children with diabetes:

  • Talk to your child’s health care provider. Ask how to best manage extra carbohydrates during the holidays, and what else your child should be tracking.
  • Make ready for the feast. When visiting over the holidays, try to learn about the menu beforehand. Bring supplies such as measuring cups if necessary. Practice measuring things at home so you can become a good estimator.  Similarly, plan ahead when going out to eat. Many restaurants post their menus on their websites. Check the nutrition information beforehand.
  • Slim it down. If you are doing the cooking, use skim versus whole milk, or artificial sweetener instead of sugar in your favorite recipes. The rest of your family may not taste the difference and will likely appreciate the fewer calories and fewer carbs.
  • Tell other parents. If your child is going to a party, mention to the host parents that your child has diabetes. This will help them understand why your child is using a meter or insulin pen. Provide phone numbers in case of an emergency.
  • Focus on the festivities. Holidays are often centered around food with family and friends. This can be stressful for parents who are attempting to manage a child’s blood sugar. Where possible, try to implement traditions that focus less on food.

S.M.A.R.T.I.E.S. is for new onset CHOC patients and their families.  Families are scheduled into one of two monthly classes as a follow up to the hospital education.  For more information, including other resources available, please call 714-509-8634.