Reduce the Risks of Cold and Flu Bugs

It’s cold and flu season! While there’s no protection against germs at school or the workplace, there are ways to reduce the risks.

Your child might have a cold if he or she has a stuffy, runny nose, a sore throat, a hacking cough or sneezes frequently. The flu spreads when an infected person coughs or sneezes. Signs of the flu include fatigue and weakness, a high fever, severe aches and pains, headache and a cough.

To help prevent these bad bugs, remind your little ones – and yourself – to:

– Wash hands often to keep from spreading germs.

– Place travel-size hand sanitizer in their backpacks.

– Postpone play dates with sick kids.

– Bundle up to stay warm. Wear appropriate outdoor clothing.

– Consider getting your child a flu shot.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends yearly flu shots for all children ages 6 months and older. The best time to get the shot is October or November, however it’s not too late to get it now!

Related articles:

  • Protecting against dry hands from frequent handwashing during COVID-19
    Frequent and thorough handwashing remains a top method of protecting against COVID-19 and other viruses, but dry and cracked hands may be an unfortunate side effect in children and adults ...
  • Hand-washing 101
    When kids and adults alike come into contact with germs, they can become infected just by touching their eyes, nose or mouth. Washing your hands is one of the best ...
  • Combating Wintertime Dry Hands in Kids
    When the temperatures drop, the wind swells and the house’s heater gets cranked up each winter, dry and cracked hands are an unfortunate and common side effect in children and ...

Tips to Prevent the Flu This Season

Tis the season for winter fun…and the flu bug? The flu season typically starts in October and lasts through April. That’s when people tend to spend more time indoors and in school, close to others who may be infected. Although the flu does seem to be going around a lot right now, we are still a few weeks away from the peak of the flu season, which is in January or February.

One way the flu spreads is when an infected person coughs or sneezes. A person might also get the flu by touching a surface or object that has the flu virus on it and then touching their own mouth or nose.

Signs of the flu include fatigue and weakness, a high fever, severe aches and pains, headache and a cough. With a cold, on the other hand, your child might have a stuffy, runny nose, a sore throat, a hacking cough or sneezes frequently.

While there’s no real protection against every germ, there are ways to reduce the risks. Remind your children to wash their hands often. Place travel-size hand sanitizer in their backpacks. Postpone play dates with sick kids. Remind your children not to share linens, utensils and dishes with those who are sick.

In addition, consider getting your child a flu shot. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends yearly flu shots for all children ages 6 months and older.

For more tips about the flu, please click here: http://www.choc.org/pressroom/index.cfm?id=P00296&nid=536

Related articles: