From CHOC mom to CHOC employee

“You look like you could use a good cup of coffee,” Maria would say from time to time to a tired parent at CHOC Children’s at Mission Hospital. “Oh yes!” they’d reply as she’d make them a cup.

Maria understands that a warm cup of coffee doesn’t just help sustain a parent who’s running low on sleep, but also gives them back a small sense of normalcy while their child is hospitalized.

Maria, a former department assistant in the administrative offices of CHOC at Mission who recently transferred to the laboratory at CHOC Children’s Hospital in Orange, knows this all too well. Her son Nehemiah, who is now a happy and healthy 11-year-old boy, was born with a heart condition and spent the first four months of his life at CHOC.

“If I see a mom struggling, I would try to do my best to be there for them because I understood what they were going through” she says. “They’re comforted knowing that someone understands.”

Delivering next door to CHOC

Thanks to a prenatal ultrasound, Maria and her husband Juan knew there was a problem with their son’s heart. But doctors told them they wouldn’t know the extent of the problem until he was born. Maria chose to deliver her son at St. Joseph Hospital in Orange so that they’d be next door to CHOC, and he would have close access to any specialized care he might need.

Shortly after Nehemiah was born, doctors performed an echocardiogram, a common and safe procedure that helps doctors look at how the heart is working. Dr. Anthony Chang, a pediatric cardiologist who is today CHOC’s chief intelligence and innovation officer, was present at Nehemiah’s birth.

“I was so scared for my son, but I felt like he was in good hands,” recalls Maria. “Dr. Chang explained Nehemiah’s condition and that he needed to be transported to CHOC for emergency surgery. He said it was a race against time.”

Nehemiah was born with interrupted aortic arch and ventricular septal defect, a condition with a large hole in the heart and blockage of the main artery feeding the body. Normally a hole in the heart would be considered bad news, but that hole helped him live because it allowed blood to circulate until corrective surgery could be done.

When Nehemiah was two days old, he underwent his first in what would become a series of heart surgeries, performed by Dr. Richard Gates, CHOC’s medical director of cardiothoracic surgery and co-medical director of CHOC’s Heart Institute.

After Nehemiah recovered from surgery in the cardiovascular intensive care unit (CVICU), he was transferred to CHOC’s neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). He had a feeding tube to help him eat, but as a step towards going home, he needed to work on eating on his own.

Nehemiah spent his first Christmas in the hospital, and his parents weren’t sure when they would be able to bring their baby home.

The day after Christmas, Nehemiah’s condition worsened when he contracted a blood infection called septicemia. Babies under 3 months can contract this because their immune systems haven’t developed enough to fight off overwhelming infections that originate elsewhere in their body. Once he was stabilized, his care team opened his chest so they could administer a vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) to help soak up the infection. A suction pump device connected to a tube with a foam sponge on the end, which was placed into Nehemiah’s chest to soak up the infection. His dressings were changed regularly for several weeks until the infection was gone. Once he recovered, his care team closed his wound and he was transferred back to the CVICU.

It takes a village

It would be another few months before Nehemiah would be able to go home. During that time, CHOC became home for his family. Juan would shuffle back and forth between hospital and the family’s home, bringing Nehemiah’s siblings Ethan and Giovanni, who were 3 years old and 10 years old at the time, to visit their baby brother. Maria’s mom would help the family and visit as well. During Nehemiah’s months-long hospitalization, Maria stayed by his side and never went home.

“It took a village to get my little guy through this ordeal,” Maria said.

A four-month hospital stay

Before Nehemiah was discharged after more than four months in the hospital, his parents received education and training from his doctors and nurses, so they would be able to care for him at home. He was discharged with a feeding tube, oxygen tank and medication.

“We were so excited to finally bring him home. In a sense, it was like we all got to finally go home,” Maria recalls. “My other two kids had essentially been living with their grandma, I had been at the hospital, and my husband had been going back and forth. We were finally together under one roof.”

Nehemiah’s heart was fragile, so as he grew up he would sometimes get sick more easily, and more severely, than his brothers and friends.

“If he would get sick with just a little cold, he would go from zero to 10,” Maria says.

Sometimes that would include seizures, which lead to two hospitalizations.

A second heart surgery

Nehemiah has undergone one additional surgery to repair a blockage that developed between his heart and great aortic artery, called a subaortic membrane.

“After his last heart surgery, his seizures stopped, and he started becoming normal,” Maria said.

These days, Nehemiah, who loves sports and music, visits CHOC every six months for check-ups with Dr. Chang to see how his heart and arteries are progressing as he gets older.

“His team always wants to know as he is growing, are the arteries growing with him? Eventually, he’ll need another procedure someday,” Maria said.

Despite semi-frequent trips to CHOC, Nehemiah is not afraid of doctors because for him, doctor appointments are second nature, according to Maria. Nehemiah has spent so much of his life in and out of CHOC that he refers to it as “My CHOC.”

A few years ago, when Maria was looking for a new job, her personal connection to CHOC was a big factor in her search, she says.

“I felt like CHOC was somewhere I’d want to work because I had so many positive experiences here as a mom. Everybody was very friendly. The nurses were good with all my kids, and with me too,” she said. “I remember that little things went a long way, and I try to bring that to my work here now.”

Learn more about the Heart Institute at CHOC Children's

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A surprise heart defect diagnosis in utero: Teddy’s story

By Elle Kennedy, mom of CHOC Children’s patient Teddy

When I got pregnant with my son Teddy, my husband and I planned to follow the route we took during my pregnancy with our daughter Charlotte—a midwife and practice we were already familiar with. In the years since our daughter had been born, that office had implemented a new rule—all babies must undergo a fetal echocardiogram, an ultrasound test during pregnancy to evaluate the heart of an unborn baby.

My pregnancy had been normal, so when I went in for this fetal echo around 23 weeks, I didn’t even have my husband Jeremy come with me. We were grateful for the precautionary test, but we didn’t expect for them to find anything abnormal.

What they found was anything but normal.

Teddy was diagnosed with anomalous pulmonary artery off the aorta. Typically, the blood is supposed to go through the heart and then into the lungs and then back through the other chamber of the heart. Teddy’s diagnosis meant that one of his lungs was attached in the wrong order. This lung was getting blood that was already oxygenated by the other lung, which can make the misaligned lung really sick. The lungs are not supposed to receive oxygenated blood; they’re supposed to oxygenate the blood.

Sometimes this condition isn’t caught in utero, and the baby seems healthy at birth, but a few months down the road they have breathing issues and the detective work to find a diagnosis begins. We were fortunate that this was diagnosed before Teddy was born, so we could be prepared.

Making a new plan

I quickly understood that the rest of my pregnancy would look different than my first, and that my birth plans would change. One of my first thoughts was, “I need to find a doctor who can deliver at St. Joseph Hospital in Orange, so that we can be right across the street from CHOC.”

We found an OB/GYN and were also referred to Dr. Nita Doshi, a pediatric cardiologist at CHOC who specializes in fetal cardiology.

In the weeks leading up to Teddy’s birth, we had a big meeting with Dr. Doshi; Dr. Richard Gates, Teddy’s cardiothoracic surgeon; many other CHOC doctors; my OB-GYN and the St. Joseph labor and delivery team. There were 15 people in the room with us, ready to share the game plan for Teddy’s birth and immediate care after he was born. Everybody went around the room, in order of what would happen to me and Teddy. It was like “OK, when you come in, here is going to be the birth team. Once he’s born, here is the team taking over. When he goes into surgery, here’s that team.” Everybody got to walk us through what they were going to do and what the stages of care would look like. That experience was amazing for us. It was really nice to be able to meet everyone ahead of time.

This was an entirely new experience for us. We had a lot of fear going into it. As a parent, you hear open heart surgery and it sounds so scary. Getting to talk to people on the team and learn about their area of expertise, and have them tell you what to expect, was a very relieving experience for us. They thought through every step of the journey.

After a lengthy but healthy delivery, Teddy was born weighing seven pounds, 14 ounces. After a quick check-up to ensure his heart was doing OK and he was breathing properly, we were able to spend 30 minutes with him before he needed to be taken to CHOC.

Teddy spent four days in the cardiac neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at CHOC before undergoing open heart surgery.

During this two-and-a-half-hour surgery, Dr. Gates removed the right pulmonary artery from the aorta and transferred it to its proper position on the main pulmonary artery.

Caring for the whole family

After surgery, Teddy spent two weeks in the cardiovascular intensive care unit (CVICU). We would visit him every day, and then go home in the evenings to put our daughter to bed. We knew our son was in good hands, and we wanted to make this time as normal as possible for his big sister.

Although the hospital staff was there to care for Teddy, they helped us prepare our daughter for her first hospital visit, as well. When Teddy was first brought to the CVICU, he was hooked up to all kinds of machines and wires. That can be scary for siblings to see. They encouraged us to wait until he was closer to going home, so that it would be a more positive experience for Charlotte. We also knew that Teddy would return to this hospital many times for other procedures and check-ups, and we didn’t want Charlotte to think of a hospital as a scary place. When she did come in, it was amazing. She loved getting to see her baby brother, and all she wanted to do was hold him. The staff was so attentive to her. Even though this wasn’t the way we intended to welcome our son into the world, it turned out to be an amazing experience.

To thank the hospital staff, and to help Charlotte feel more involved in her brother’s care, we brought small felt hearts on safety pins for her to give out to his nurses and doctors. She walked around the unit handing them out and said, “Thank you for taking care of Teddy.” It’s a tradition we’ve continued at appointments to this day.

When Teddy was around 3 weeks old, we finally got to bring him home. His sister was so happy! He had a bandage on his chest so he couldn’t do tummy time right away, but other than that it was a normal routine.

Teddy’s first angioplasty

Three months later, we came back to CHOC for an angioplasty. Scar tissue was building where they had stitched the artery in place, so the artery wasn’t growing properly. During this procedure, they made a small incision in an artery in Teddy’s thigh, inserted a small balloon and snaked it up to his heart, and slowly expanded the balloon in order to safely break up the scar tissue and gently stretch the artery. This time, we only had to spend one night in the hospital for observation.

Teddy had a follow-up angioplasty when he was three years old. He will need another angioplasty in another three to five years, depending on how his artery grows in relation to the rest of his body. Someday, he will have a stent (a tiny mesh tube) put in to permanently keep his artery open.

pre-op room with toys
Teddy playing with toys before an angioplasty,

Throughout this process, CHOC has been amazing for us because they’re willing to take our say into consideration. Our team always asks us, “Are you comfortable with this plan?” We have been involved in the decision-making progress every step of the way.

Teddy today

Teddy is smaller than the average 3-year-old boy. Personally, I think it’s a blessing that he’s growing a little slower than other kids his age. It’s giving his heart time to grow at a slower pace because the rest of his body isn’t growing as fast. Other than his smaller than average stature, he’s a healthy kid. He underwent occupational and physical therapy for a while to help him meet milestones, but he graduated from those therapies at 18 months and now he is hitting or exceeding all of his milestones.

These days, we see Dr. Doshi every six months for a check-up. Despite many appointments and procedures over the last few years, Teddy has no fear of the doctor. When he sees a Choco Bear logo on a billboard, he points and says, “Mom that’s where I went and had my operation. They took care of me there.”

If you look at him, you wouldn’t know he had a heart condition. Unless you see him shirtless and notice his scar, you would think he was just a typical kid. He talks well for his age, and he loves anything with wheels. He’s a very brave young boy, which we knew from day one.

bumblebee boy costume
After his last angioplasty, Teddy requested a photo shoot dressed as his favorite superhero. Bumblebee Boy.

A message to other moms

To any other moms with hospitalized babies, know that you are not alone. For me, the hardest part of this journey was not knowing anyone else whose baby was hospitalized after birth. Know that there are other parents out there who understand what you’re going through.

This journey could have been a scary experience for our family, but I never imagined it could actually be a positive experience. I thought we would just have to get through this, but Teddy has so much fun laughing and playing with the nurses who take care of him before and after procedures.

CHOC has done a really great job of thinking through everything from a patient perspective and a parent perspective. They try to create the best possible experience from start to finish for everyone involved. They make it a reassuring process for parents, a happy experience for siblings, and a safe experience for patients.

At CHOC, everyone’s goal is to make a child’s experience a positive one.

Learn more about the Heart Institute at CHOC Children's

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Contending with Coarctation of the Aorta: Ella’s Story

Lindsey and Oliver Nam had hoped to hold a special celebration to mark their daughter Ella’s 100th day of life – a tradition in some Asian cultures to commemorate an important milestone for a family.

But a big celebration with friends and family would need to wait.

Shortly after birth, Ella was diagnosed with coarctation of the aorta, a congenital heart defect. While the family awaited next steps, they couldn’t risk her being in a large crowd and getting sick.

“It was hard,” Lindsey says. “That’s the scariest thing to think about. You just brought them into the world and now something is wrong.”

The journey begins

Tests conducted just after Ella’s birth in December 2017 first revealed a heart murmur, an unusual sound made by blood circulating through the heart’s chambers or valves, or through blood vessels near the heart.

After two extra days in the hospital, Ella had progressed nicely and the new family of three headed home. On the horizon were follow-up medical appointments to determine whether Ella’s murmur was harmless or caused by an underlying heart condition.

At home, Ella was gaining weight, doing well and reaching milestones – so when a pediatric cardiologist made his diagnosis, her parents were surprised.

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Coarctation of the aorta means that a large artery in Ella’s heart that carries oxygen-rich blood from the left ventricle to the body was too narrow. This can restrict the amount of blood that could travel to the lower part of Ella’s body.

If the condition went untreated or the aorta didn’t widen on its own, Ella’s heart would need to work harder and harder to pump blood, leading to a possibility of stroke or heart failure.

But because Ella was healthy and doing well, the family considered alternate timelines for treatment and sought second opinions.

A big decision

When Ella was about 7 months old, though, surgery became a reality. After more tests, experts at the CHOC Children’s Heart Institute recommended Ella undergo surgery to correct the problem as soon as possible.

“It was hard to hear,” Lindsey says. “That’s when we started to get worried.”

Dr. Richard Gates, a pediatric heart surgeon and co-medical director of the Heart Institute, would perform the procedure. By working through Ella’s back, near her shoulder blade, he would widen the narrow artery.

Heading into surgery day, Lindsey and Oliver were frightened, but maintained a brave face for their daughter.

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Ella recovering from heart surgery in CHOC’s cardiovascular intensive care unit (CVICU).

“Going into it and preparing for it, I was strong,” Lindsey said. “I didn’t want her to think anything was wrong.”

The procedure went well, but Lindsey’s strong façade crumbled when she saw Ella afterward.

“The worst part was when I saw her after the surgery,” she says. “Everything was fine but seeing her sedated and with all these tubes in her – oh, my goodness. It was a lot to handle. I broke down.”

Recovering

Ella was in great hands at CHOC’s cardiovascular intensive care unit, where she spent five days recovering after surgery. By the fourth day, Ella was able to keep down milk and even ventured outside for a wagon ride. On the fifth day, the family of three headed home.

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Just four days after surgery, Ella was well enough to venture outside for a wagon ride. Here she is pictured with her heart surgeon, Dr. Richard Gates.

“It’s the best feeling ever,” Lindsey said.

Several months after surgery, Ella has had some follow-up visits and there remains a chance that she may need surgery again someday.

For now, though, she is healthy and right on track developmentally. Ella is crawling and pulling herself up on furniture, with first steps nearly within reach.

Rather than worry about the future, the Nams are mindful to focus on Ella’s happiness and health – and they’d offer the same advice to another family contending with a heart defect.

“I would just say remain calm and just take it one day at a time,” Lindsey says. “Also, do your research and try to get second and third opinions.”

Time to celebrate

The family has also been making up for some lost opportunities. In lieu of the big 100th day celebration the Nams never got to host, they went big when it came to commemorating Ella’s first birthday a few months ago.

After all, they had so much to celebrate.

“She’s accomplished so much,” Lindsey says.

ella-birthday
Ella’s first birthday celebration
Learn more about the Heart Institute at CHOC Children's

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Ventricular Septal Defect: Veer’s Story

Veer’s father Jatin spent many sleepless nights searching the internet for ventricular septal defect (VSD), a condition his son has endured since birth. He was nervous awaiting his son’s upcoming appointment for a heart surgery consultation and wanted to know everything he could about VSD.

Veer was born at a local hospital and diagnosed with VSD at birth. Veer was monitored regularly by a physician, and when he was 18 months old, his parents transitioned his care to CHOC Children’s cardiologist Dr. James Chu to monitor the VSD.

“Dr. Chu kept on an eye on Veer to make sure he was doing well. He got regular echocardiograms, first every two to three months progressing to every six months and then every year since he was getting better,” says Veer’s mom, Sweta.

VSD is a hole between the heart’s lower chambers allowing blood to pass from the left to the right side of the heart. The oxygen rich blood then gets pumped back to the lungs instead of out to the body, causing the heart to work harder. Often, small VSDs can close on their own.

An echocardiogram, also known as a cardiac ultrasound, uses sound waves to create pictures of the heart. It shows the structure of the heart and its parts and how well they’re working.

A few months before Veer’s fourth birthday, Dr. Chu said the hole in his heart was no longer improving and that it might need to be surgically repaired. The hole was very close to the AV nodes (the natural pacemaker of the heart) and the tricuspid valve was regurgitating which can lead to right-sided heart failure.

Dr. Chu referred Veer to CHOC Children’s pediatric cardiothoracic surgeon Dr. Richard Gates for a consultation. Dr. Gates saw the echocardiogram and knew right away Veer would need surgery to repair the VSD.

“Before we were able to meet with Dr. Gates, we had so many sleepless nights thinking about what could happen if Veer needed heart surgery. But after meeting Dr. Gates, we felt comforted and confident about moving forward with surgery. He explained every step of the surgery to us and answered all of our questions,” says Sweta.

Surgery Day

Within days, Veer was at CHOC Children’s Heart Institute having surgery to repair his VSD.

Veer’s surgery would require a biograft, which is like a patch, that will usually cause the valve to fall back into place. If that didn’t happen during the surgery, Veer would need more surgery done to repair the VSD at the time of the operation.

The surgery went well, and Veer only needed the biograft. “Dr. Chu told us recently that the surgery was done so well and precise that you can’t even tell on the echocardiogram where the graft was done,” says Sweta.

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Veer recovering from surgery to repair his ventricular septal defect at CHOC.

“Our experience with CHOC was amazing. All of the doctors, nurses and child life specialists took care of Veer like their own family member,” Sweta says. “The child life specialists were so friendly. Veer loves bubbles and cars, so they brought him bubbles and the Disney Cars movie. He got to hold the iPad and watch the movie before the surgery which made him so happy. After surgery, they even brought a larger bed in the room so that I could sleep next to him.”

Today, Veer is full of energy and thriving.

veer-today
Today, Veer is thriving.

“When he used to play with his toy cars, he would lie on his side because he didn’t have a lot of energy,” Sweta says. “Now he has so much energy that he doesn’t have to do that, and he’s able to run around with his older siblings.”

Learn more about the Heart Institute at CHOC Children's

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A Surprise Diagnosis of Transposition of the Great Arteries: T.J.’s Story

By Buffy O’Neil, mom of CHOC Children’s patient T.J.

When my youngest son T.J. was born, we were so excited to complete our family. His nursery was ready to go and we had picked out the outfit he’d wear home from the hospital. I’d even done genetic testing, and everything about T.J. looked fine.

I wanted to deliver my son at St. Joseph Hospital in Orange because I knew if anything happened, which I didn’t expect it to, CHOC Children’s was right next door. I drove all the way to St. Joseph when I was in labor so that we’d be close to CHOC if we needed them.

Even though T.J. was a bigger baby than we anticipated and I had a rough delivery, everything looked fine right after he was born. A minute later he started to turn blue. They thought it was because of the rough delivery. They gave him some oxygen, but he turned blue again. That’s when we knew something was wrong.

My delivery team paged a neonatologist from CHOC who rushed over to evaluate him. Within minutes, there was a neonatologist in our room, and then T.J. was on his way to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at CHOC, and my husband went with him. That neonatologist suspected there was a problem with T.J.’s heart, and brought in two pediatric cardiologists, Dr. Fahrouch Berdjis and Dr. James Chu. Dr Chu performed an echocardiogram, also known as a cardiac ultrasound, and diagnosed T.J. with transposition of the great arteries. They reassured me that I hadn’t done anything wrong during my pregnancy that caused this. TGA is due to abnormal development of the fetal heart, which occurs during the first eight weeks of pregnancy.

The heart has four chambers and four valves. The problem in transposition of the great arteries is that the two main arteries leaving the heart come off the wrong pumping chamber. This makes the blood flow incorrectly and makes the baby sick at birth. In order for babies with TGA to have a chance at survival, they need a diagnosis within hours of birth, and then an immediate procedure called a balloon artrial septostomy. During this procedure, a special catheter with a balloon in the tip is used to create an opening in the wall between the left and right atria, to improve the mixing of oxygen-rich and oxygen-poor blood.

On the first day of T.J.’s life, nothing happened as we had planned, but everything happened as it should. I can’t even imagine what it would’ve been like if something had gone wrong. I thank God every day that T.J. was born at St. Joseph Hospital and CHOC was right next door. The doctors told us that many babies that have to be transferred to a children’s hospital to be evaluated have died in the process. Because T.J. was born at a facility that’s literally connected to CHOC (via an underground tunnel), he was able to be diagnosed and had his procedure done within hours.

The first week of T.J.’s life was really scary. His right lung collapsed and then got a little stronger, only to have his left lung collapse. Babies with TGA need to have their first open heart surgery in the first week of life, and we weren’t sure if he was even going to live long enough to have that surgery. Doctors, nurses and respiratory therapists did everything they could to stabilize him.

Everything was very overwhelming. The baby who we had expected to be perfectly healthy was lying in a hospital crib with a lot of wires and monitors attached to him. He was so close to dying. All we could do was sit, watch and pray he would survive.

Every doctor we met with was so patient and explained everything in a way we could understand. We were overwhelmed and just trying to take it all in.

After a scary six days, T.J. was stable enough to undergo his first open heart surgery called an arterial switch. During that procedure, Dr. Richard Gates pediatric cardiothoracic surgeon and co-medical director of CHOC’s Heart Institute, cut open T.J.’s chest, cut his arteries and switched them so they were in the correct spot, and then stitched them into place.

Five hours after we kissed our son goodbye and saw him being wheeled back into the operating room, Dr. Gates came out to meet us in the waiting room. He said the surgery had been difficult but overall it went well, and now everything was all up to baby T.J.

In the week after T.J.’s open-heart surgery, he wasn’t breathing as well as we hoped he would. His team decided to do a cardiac catheterization procedure to determine why he still had a murmur and issues with his oxygen levels. During that procedure, they placed a wire, mesh device called a stent in a narrowed artery to keep it open and improve blood flow.

After this, T.J.’s oxygen levels improved, but his heart and lungs had been through a lot and needed to grow stronger before we could go home. Our next big hurdle was getting T.J. to eat on his own. Our feeding specialist was surprised at how fast he caught on to sucking and swallowing, but because his body was working so hard to recover from surgery, he was burning more calories than he was taking in. The doctors decided it was best to place a percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy tube (more commonly known as a G-tube or feeding tube) directly into T.J.’s stomach so he wouldn’t have to work so hard to eat, but he’d still get the calories he needed to grow stronger.

Another unexpected hurdle was when T.J. started having withdrawals from the pain medication he had been placed on after surgery. A registered nurse/pain specialist was assigned to us in order to evaluate how best to help T.J. cope. She put him on a 30-day weaning plan and after a few days he started improving, and soon we were on our way home!

We were so happy to finally take our baby home, almost six weeks after he was born. We went home with a lot more than we came with, including a medication schedule with six different drugs outlined by his nurses, plus a breathing machine.

We knew T.J. would need another open-heart surgery before his first birthday. We had periodic appointments with his cardiologist Dr. Chu, and a feeding specialist as well. A few months later, Dr. Chu performed a cardiac ultrasound or echocardiogram to see how T.J.’s heart was working. He told us that even though T.J. had grown a lot and was healthy, it was time for his surgery. His arteries were not growing enough to keep up with him.

T.J.’s second open heart surgery occurred when he was six months old, and he had a third surgery when he was 18 months. Each of those were to expand arteries to allow for better blood flow. As a parent, I always appreciated Dr. Gates’ honesty. He told us that these were intense surgeries, and that T.J. would need blood transfusions during them to compensate for blood loss during surgery.

after-heart-surgery-transportation-of-the-great-arteries
T.J. after surgery

After the second and third surgery, we spent a week in the cardiovascular intensive care unit (CVICU) at CHOC. We were blown away at how the nursing staff cared for our entire family during that time. We were putting our son in their hands, but they didn’t just take care of him. They took care of all of us. Years later, the nurses that cared for him when he was a baby still want to hear updates about T.J. and how he’s doing in school.

For the first 18 months of T.J.’s life, it felt like we were at CHOC all the time. It was an unexpected start to my son’s life, and at the time, it was devastating. I felt like I was the only mom experiencing this, and if there’s any moms reading this I want you to know that you’re not alone. There are people out there who understand what you’re going through. Ask your child’s care team if they can put you in touch with other families who may be willing to share their stories with you. For my husband and me, being able to meet people with the same conditions, and to share stories with other adults who have been through what you’ve been through was incredibly helpful.

TJ-today
Today, T.J. is a happy eight-year-old who loves sports and is a straight-A student.

Today, T.J. is a happy eight-year-old. He’s very athletic and loves to play sports, and I’m proud to say he is a straight-A student. When he feels self-conscious about his scars, we remind him how special and strong he is. Even though his life has been filled with several surgeries and countless doctor’s appointments, he has no anxiety about going to the doctor’s office because he’s always treated so well there. When T.J. was a baby we saw Dr. Chu monthly, and now that his heart is doing so well, we only have to go twice per year.

As for my heart, I have a very special place in it for CHOC― especially for Dr. Gates and Dr. Chu. Both of them are in photos in T.J.’s room. We remind them at every appointment that they are the reason T.J. is alive.

Learn more about the Heart Institute at CHOC Children's

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