What we’re thankful for this year: 2020

Despite the countless challenges brought on by 2020, the physicians, nurses, staff, patients and donors that make CHOC a world-class pediatric healthcare system have retained a sense of gratitude. Several members of the CHOC community share what they are most thankful for this year.

Kim Cripe_CHOC president and CEOKim Cripe, CHOC president and CEO

“There are no words to fully express how thankful I am to the physicians, nurses, and staff who have worked so tirelessly and sacrificed so much these past nine months of the pandemic.  I have always been proud of our team and how well we support one another on a daily basis. Yet, our ability to rally in a crisis, particularly as long as this one has been (and will continue to be), has truly left me in awe. I am enormously grateful to everyone at CHOC across all departments, geographies and locations for the way we are not only tackling this challenge together, but also supporting the children and families we serve.” 

chris-furman

Chris Furman, chairman, CHOC board of directors

“I continue to be grateful for serving as chairman of CHOC’s board of directors.   Especially during these challenging times, I am incredibly honored to help CHOC’s physicians, staff, volunteers and donors protect the health and well-being of children in Orange County and beyond.” 

dr-jasjit-singh

Dr. Jasjit Singh, pediatric infectious disease specialist

“Despite all the challenges and changes this year has presented, I feel grateful to be part of the CHOC community. At the beginning of this experience, when there were still so many unknowns, I saw nurses, doctors and all the staff put aside their own fears and rise to the challenge in order to take care of their patients. And I have been watching them continue to do that every day since. It has been inspiring. I am grateful to my colleagues, and their commitment to implementing the latest guidelines and regulations to serve our patients and their families, and for their much-needed detective work on complicated cases. I’m grateful for CHOC parents and my patients – for sharing their strength, resilience, humor and hope with us every day. And last but not least, I owe gratitude for my wonderful family & the fact that we are in a place that allows us to serve our community.”

Dr. Terrence Sanger, chief scientist at CHOC Children's

Dr. Terence Sanger, vice president for research and chief scientific officer

“In a year that has been filled with unprecedented challenges, I am thankful for the opportunity to have joined CHOC’s mighty brigade in February 2020 to help the organization continue to go beyond. I am grateful to be working alongside such amazing colleagues who are committed to the mission of elevating the cutting-edge work being conducted at CHOC’s Research Institute.” 

CHOC Hospital_Outpatient evaluation center

Kelly Navarro, RN, BSN, CPN, CHOC outpatient evaluation center 

“After working at CHOC for 10 years, I am so grateful to have had the opportunity to serve CHOC patients and families in a new way this year at our outpatient evaluation center. CHOC quickly established these outdoor, drive-through facilities at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic to offer our patients a safe and convenient way to be evaluated by a pediatric medical provider, receive treatment when necessary, and undergo COVID-19 testing. The center gives us the ability to ensure continuity of care for patients having surgery, as well as those needing sleep studies and many other necessary procedures. I am grateful for the privilege of serving as a constant for our patients and their families: that they can always count on CHOC for safe, high-quality and convenient care.”

Allison, age 12, CHOC patient

Dr. Mike Weiss

Dr. Michael Weiss, vice president of population health

“At a time in our lives when we have never felt more distant from our friends, neighbors and loved ones, I’m grateful that CHOC was able to deepen our “connection” with our patients and families and provide high-quality medical care through telehealth technology. This service has proven to be a true lifesaver for many children and families. From primary care to sub-specialty care and mental health to speech therapy, CHOC has provided over 55,000 telehealth visits since mid-March. Our patient satisfaction scores have remained over 90% and the subjective feedback we receive is overwhelmingly positive. In addition, this technology has allowed us to support a broader community of patients and families as well as our Orange County schools by providing COVID-19 support and education when and where it is most needed. Connecting is always important, but it has never meant more to our community, and to us, than it does now!”

Grace Magedman

Grace Magedman, executive director of pharmacy

I am very proud of and extremely grateful for everyone involved in launching our prescription delivery service during the state’s spring lockdown. The flexibility, compassion and innovation demonstrated by staff across multiple departments and by our supporters, Hyundai Motor America and Russell Westbrook Hyundai of Anaheim, resulted in a valued resource that helped safeguard the community we serve, especially the most medically fragile members. 

christopher-min-pediatric-psychologist-choc-childrens

Dr. Christopher Min, pediatric psychologist

Despite the challenges that 2020 has brought, I find myself even more thankful than years past. I am so very thankful for my wife and two little girls, as well as the little furball we recently welcomed into our family. I am also grateful for each of my team members who have come together to offer mental health services in a primary care setting; for fighting the front lines against mental illness in children; and for the way they have grown in their hearts of service, all amidst a global pandemic. I am reminded of the strong bonds that I have with trusted partners at CHOC across mental health, primary care, clinical staff, and CHOC at Mission Hospital. And I am most grateful for the privilege of serving the most vulnerable among us, our children.”

Korbin, age 6, CHOC patient

CHOC clinical associate

Ashlynn Graham, clinical associate

After a year of uncertainties and a new normal, it can be hard to find the good in what 2020 has thrown our way. This year and every year, I am blessed with my family and our health. I am grateful that I have had the ability to work at both CHOC Hospital, and CHOC at Mission Hospital. I am also thankful for all the first responders that have continued to give to those in need during these unthinkable times.

Clavis Foundation

Clavis Foundation’s Tusdi Vopat and Stuart McClure. Tusdi is also a member of CHOC Foundation’s Board of Directors

“We are extremely blessed and grateful for many things, including the privilege to work with CHOC. Their tireless commitment and dedication to the health and well-being of our children is what inspires us all to strive and support such a great institution. Never before has CHOC, or anyone, been met with such extreme challenges as the COVID-19 pandemic. Yet, CHOC and its staff continues to put patients first, keeping families and healthcare workers safe, and understanding the increased challenges of mental health during this time. We are honored to be part of this amazing team and look forward to a stronger and brighter future ahead for all of us.”

Colleen Smith CHOC nurse

Colleen Smith, manager of clinical programs, CHOC at Mission Hospital

“As I walked through the CHOC at Mission Hospital doors the morning of Sept. 11th, 2020 I took out my phone to text my hiring manager, still a longtime friend, to say, ’20 years ago today I walked through these doors for the very first time thanks to you.’ I had no idea all those years ago what my nursing career would look like so many years later. I am filled with gratitude every day, not only for the opportunities I have been given but, also for the joy I feel working at CHOC at Mission. Not everyone can continue to say they love what they do 20 years later. I consider that a true blessing! Thank you, CHOC at Mission and the entire CHOC healthcare system,  for always believing in me and growing me into the nurse I am today. I feel honored to be a pediatric nurse in my community”

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Why getting a flu shot is more important than ever this year

It’s important that each member of your family get their flu shot every year. This is especially true this year, amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Since both influenza and COVID-19 can have overlapping symptoms, it may be difficult for doctors to determine which virus is behind your symptoms based on a clinical exam alone according to Dr. Jasjit Singh, pediatric infectious disease specialist at CHOC.

dr-jasjit-singh-choc-childrens
Dr. Jasjit Singh, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at CHOC

“Access to testing for both viruses will be essential to determine the cause of the illness and help inform care decisions,” Singh says.

These overlapping symptoms may include, but are not limited to:

  • Fever or chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Fatigue
  • Sore throat
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Muscle pain or body aches
  • Headache

Dr. Singh adds, “Influenza season and the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic present an overlapping utilization of the same resources, including personal protective equipment (PPE), hospital beds and equipment. It’s essential that we all do our part in curbing the spread of influenza this season to limit any potential strain on these resources.”

There is also growing concern among providers that people could become infected with both viruses at the same time, according to Dr. Singh.

“This year more than ever, it is important to get a flu shot to offer as much protection as possible from influenza ,” says Dr. Singh

In this Q&A, Dr. Singh answers some other common questions parents have about the influenza vaccine amid COVID-19.

When is the best time to get a flu shot? Is it possible to get the flu shot too late?

The Centers for Disease Control recommends people get vaccinated against influenza by late October, before the influenza season starts. However, it is not too late to get your flu vaccine.  Anyone who has yet to receive their annual influenza vaccine should still get vaccinated. Your annual influenza vaccine can protect you from getting infected with influenza, and importantly, can also help prevent serious outcomes, including hospitalizations or death.

What time of day should you get a flu shot? 

There is no specific time of day that makes a flu shot more or less effective. Choose a time that is convenient and available for you and your provider.

What are the side effects of getting a flu shot? 

Some patients experience low grade fever, muscle and joint aches, headaches or nausea.  You cannot get influenza infection from the flu shot, but some patients can experience mild “influenza-like symptoms” for up to two days after receiving the vaccine. Some patients also experience redness and swelling around the injection site. Here are some tips for making shots less stressful for kids.

How can I protect my family from influenza this year? How can I protect my family from COVID-19?

Besides getting an influenza vaccine, washing your hands – properly and often – is the single best way to protect yourself against influenza. Here’s advice from a pediatrician on proper hand-washing.

To further protect yourself and your family from the flu this season, remember these tips:

  • Stay home when you’re sick, and stay away from others who are ill
  • Cover your nose and mouth when you cough
  • Get enough sleep
  • Eat a well-balanced diet

With no COVID-19 vaccine currently available, the best way to prevent this illness is to avoid being exposed. It’s also important to take preventative steps:

  • The CDC recommends the use of cloth face coverings in public for those over age 2
  • Practice physical distancing
  • Avoid large gatherings, particularly indoors
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing.
  • The CDC recommends laundering items including washable plush toys as appropriate following the manufacturer’s instructions. When possible, use the warmest appropriate water setting for the items and let them dry completely. Laundry from an ill person can be washed with other people’s items.
  • Check out this list of how to prepare your household for a potential COVID-19 outbreak.
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Featured image c/o the American Academy of Pediatrics & SELF magazine.

How to celebrate Halloween safely during COVID-19

As temperatures begin to cool and the community prepares for Halloween celebrations, CHOC Children’s experts provide the following recommendations for how to celebrate Halloween safely amid COVID-19.

“Celebrating holidays such as Halloween is a treasured part of childhood, and we want all children and families to make special memories together. It’s important to heed safety precautions and celebrate safely,” says Dr. Jasjit Singh, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at CHOC Children’s. “While many people feel restless after months of stay at home orders and life looking so much different than it used to, now is the time to be as vigilant as ever in curbing the spread of COVID-19.”

These recommendations are meant to supplement, rather than replace, any local or statewide rules and regulations.

Celebrate virtually

Use technology such as FaceTime, Zoom or Skype to enjoy festivities such as costume contests, pumpkin carvings or festive meals together.

Or, have a virtual, interactive watch party for your favorite Halloween movie using Netflix Party or Disney+’s GroupWatch. These services allow you to synchronize your show or movie with friends and family, and chat while you’re watching.

Celebrating virtually is especially important if you are celebrating with family members over the age of 65, or those who are immunocompromised and have underlying conditions that put them at greater risk of complications from COVID-19.

Festive outdoor celebrations

Carving or decorating pumpkins outside with neighbors, from a safe distance, is considered a low-risk activity by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Families could also consider organizing a Halloween scavenger hunt where kids can search for festive items as they walk from house to house, admiring decorations from a distance.

If you visit a pumpkin patch or apple orchard, ensure the location requires frequent hand-washing or hand sanitizer use, masks are required and social distancing is maintained.

Wear a mask

It’s important to remember that a Halloween costume mask is not a substitute for a proper face covering, says Dr. Belinda Dao, a CHOC Children’s pediatrician. “Masks that do not meet the stated criteria from the CDC are not appropriate face masks,” Dr. Dao says.

Pediatrician Dr. Marnie Granados adds, “protective masks should cover a child’s nose and mouth, be secure under their chin, and fit snugly against the sides of their face.”

Learn more about the important of wearing a proper face covering this Halloween.

Trick-or-treating

Per the CDC, a moderate-risk activity is a one-way trick-or-treating path where individually wrapped goodie bags are lined up at the end of driveways or sidewalks for kids to grab and go while maintaining social distancing.

Anyone preparing goodie bags should practice proper hand-washing before and after.

Activities to avoid this Halloween

Traditional trick-or-treating where treats are handed to children who go door to do is not recommended by the CDC, nor are trunk-or-treat events where treats are given to children from trunks of cars lined up in parking lots. These celebrations don’t allow for proper social distancing.

Likewise, indoor events such as costume parties and haunted houses are not recommended during COVID-19.

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Face coverings during COVID-19: Answers to common questions

Social distancing and proper hand-washing are critical ways to protect yourself and your family from COVID-19. Cloth face coverings are an additional step to slow the spread of COVID-19. Get answers to your frequently asked questions in this Q&A with CHOC Children’s infectious disease experts.

Do I have to wear a face covering in public?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends cloth face coverings in public settings in places like grocery stores and pharmacies where physical distancing measures can be difficult to maintain. These face coverings can slow the spread of COVID-19 and help people who may have the virus and do not know it from transmitting it to others. It is not necessary for children under the age of 2 to wear cloth face coverings.

The governor of California has mandated that face coverings be worn by the general public when outside the home. This applies to high-risk situations such as entering public spaces; obtaining medical attention; riding public transit; certain work settings; and while outdoors in public spaces when maintaining a physical distance of 6 feet from persons who are not members of your household is not feasible. Exemptions include children age 2 and younger; persons with a medical condition, mental health condition or disability that prevents them from wearing a face covering; the hearing impaired or those communicating with them; persons seated at restaurants while eating or drinking, provided they maintain physical distancing; and those engaged in outdoor work or recreation alone or with household members while maintaining physical distancing from others. Read the full order here.

Is there anyone who should not wear a face covering?

Children under age 2, or anyone who has trouble breathing, is unconscious, incapacitated or unable to remove the mask without assistance should not use a cloth face covering.

What’s the right way to wear a face covering?

Wash your hands before putting on your face covering. It should cover your nose and mouth, be secure under your chin, and fit snugly against the sides of your face. Make sure you can breathe easily while wearing your mask.

Don’t put the covering around your neck or up on your forehead. Avoid touching your face covering. If you do, wash your hands.

Here’s a helpful video from Dr. Katherine Williamson, a CHOC Children’s pediatrician, on how to wear a face covering:

Should I wear a surgical mask?

N-95 or surgical masks are not recommended for public use, as supplies are needed by healthcare workers and first responders.

How can I make my own face covering?

The CDC offers tutorials for sewn and non-sewn face coverings.

What’s the best way to remove my face covering?

Untie the stings behind your head or stretch the ear loops. Only hold your face covering by these ties or strings to avoid transferring any germs that may be on your hands onto the portion of the cloth that covers your nose and mouth.

Wash your hands after removing your face mask.

How do I wash my face covering?

Wash your face covering frequently, using one of these methods:

  • In the laundry – It’s OK to include your face covering in your regular laundry. Use your regular laundry detergent and the warmest possible setting for the cloth used in your face covering,
  • By hand – When washing face coverings by hand, the CDC suggests using a bleach solution by mixing 5 tablespoons (or 1/3 cup) of household bleach per gallon of room temperature water OR 4 teaspoons of household bleach per quart of room temperature water. Soak the face covering in the bleach solution for five minutes. Then thoroughly rinse with cool or room temperature water.
    • Always check the label on your bleach before using. Ensure your bleach is intended for disinfection, and that it’s not past its expiration date.
    • Never mix household bleach with ammonia or any other cleanser.

Why should I wear a face covering?

Many people with COVID-19 have no symptoms. Wearing a face covering helps protect others in your community – like those with autoimmune disorders or the elderly – in case you’re infected but don’t have any symptoms.

How can I help my child who is afraid of face masks?

Some children may incorporate mask wearing into their daily lives with ease, while others may find it odd, uncomfortable or even scary. If your child is having trouble wearing a mask, here’s advice from a CHOC pediatric psychologist on how to ease their fears.

Additional resources
The Orange County Health Care Agency has a printable graphic that offers an overview of how to wear and wash your mask available in multiple languages:

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Coronavirus: What parents should know

We know how frightening it may be for parents to hear news reports about the 2019 novel Coronavirus (COVID-19). Get answers to your frequently asked questions – and some peace of mind – in this Q & A with CHOC Children’s infectious disease experts.

What is COVID-19?
COVID-19 is a disease caused by a novel strain of coronavirus. Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses and commonly infect people around the world with mild upper respiratory infections. Sometimes coronaviruses that infect animals can evolve and become a new human coronavirus strain. These can cause more severe illness. The current outbreak began in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China and has spread to other countries, including the U.S.

Who is at risk for COVID-19 infection?
Mostly people older than 60 and those with pre-existing health conditions are at greater risk. Additionally, people who have had contact with people confirmed to have COVID-19. Based on available evidence, healthy children do not appear to be at higher risk for COVID-19 related complications compared to adults, according to the CDC.

How do you get COVID-19?
We are still learning exactly how COVID-19 spreads. What we do know though that the virus is spread mainly from person-to-person contact. This can happen when people within 6 feet of each other inhale respiratory droplets produced when someone speaks, coughs or sneezes.

COVID-19 is thought to be spread primarily through inhaling droplets produced when someone coughs or sneezes or by transmission between people in close contact.

Can someone spread the virus without being sick?
The CDC reports that recent studies show a significant portion of individuals with COVID-19 lack symptoms. Even the people who eventually develop symptoms can pass the virus to others before showing symptoms. This means that the virus can spread between people interacting in close proximity — for example, speaking, coughing or sneezing — even if those people are not exhibiting symptoms.

Can I get COVID-19 from touching an object?
This is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads. However, it is possible that someone who touches their nose, mouth or eyes after touching a surface with the virus on it could possibly get the virus.

What are the symptoms of COVID-19 infection?
Symptoms can include fever, cough and shortness of breath. The CDC has identified muscles aches and loss or taste or smell as additional possible symptoms. For an updated list of possible symptoms as reported by the CDC, click here.

Symptoms typically appear two to 14 days after exposure.

According to the CDC, the symptoms of COVID-19 are similar in children and adults. However, children with confirmed COVID-19 have generally presented with mild symptoms. Reported symptoms in children include cold-like symptoms, such as fever, runny nose and cough. Vomiting and diarrhea have also been reported.

How can I protect my family from COVID-19?
With no vaccine currently available, the best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed. It’s also important to take preventative steps:

  • The CDC recommends the use of cloth face coverings in public for those over age 2
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing. Get more information on hand-washing— and here’s a fun graphic.
  • The CDC recommends laundering items including washable plush toys as appropriate following the manufacturer’s instructions. When possible, use the warmest appropriate water setting for the items and let them dry completely. Laundry from an ill person can be washed with other people’s items.
  • Check out this list of how to prepare your household for a potential COVID-19 outbreak.

Should my children and I wear masks?
The CDC recommends cloth face coverings in public settings in places like grocery stores and pharmacies where physical distancing measures can be difficult to maintain. These face coverings can slow the spread of COVID-19 and help people who may have the virus and do not know it from transmitting it to others. It is not necessary for children under the age of 2 to wear cloth face coverings.

The governor of California has mandated that face coverings be worn by the general public when outside the home. This applies to high-risk situations such as entering public spaces; obtaining medical attention; riding public transit; certain work settings; and while outdoors in public spaces when maintaining a physical distance of 6 feet from persons who are not members of your household is not feasible. Exemptions include children age 2 and younger; persons with a medical condition, mental health condition or disability that prevents them from wearing a face covering; the hearing impaired or those communicating with them; persons seated at restaurants while eating or drinking, provided they maintain physical distancing; and those engaged in outdoor work or recreation alone or with household members while maintaining physical distancing from others. Read the full order here.

Here’s guidance from the CDC on how to properly wear a cloth face covering, as well as tutorials on how to make your own mask.

N-95 or surgical masks are not recommended for public use, as supplies are needed by healthcare workers and first responders.

Practicing proper cough and sneeze etiquette can help prevent the spread of illness.

My family has upcoming travel plans. Should we cancel?
We recommend following the CDC’s guidance for travel, and for using public transportation.

Should we stay away from gatherings like church, sporting events or amusement parks? What about smaller gatherings?
Fluctuating numbers of COVID-19 cases have led to changes in what businesses and organizations may operate. See updated guidelines here.

When visiting entities that are open, people are encouraged to be mindful that physical distancing and wearing face coverings reduce the likelihood of transmission of COVID-19.

In addition to practicing proper handwashing, people should watch for symptoms and avoid going out if they feel ill. When outside the home, people should physically distance from others whenever possible and wear a face covering.

How can my family stay safe when venturing out?

If you have COVID-19 symptoms or have been exposed to someone with COVID-19, stay home and away from other people. If you choose to leave home, be mindful that the more closely you interact with others and the longer the interaction, the higher the risk of COVID-19 spread.

Before leaving home, the CDC recommends people think about:

  • How many people will you interact with?
    • Being in a group with who people who are not practicing physical distancing or wearing face coverings increases your risk, as does engaging with people who don’t live with you.
  • Can you keep 6 feet of space between yourself and others? Will you be outdoors or indoors?
    • The closer you are to other people who may be infected, increases your risk of getting sick.
    • Indoor spaces are more risky than outdoor spaces where it might be harder to keep people apart and there’s less ventilation.
  • What’s the length of time you will be interacting with people?
    • The more time you spend with others, the higher your risk of becoming infected, as well as their risk of being infected if there’s any chance you have COVID-19.

Before leaving home, consider the following questions to help determine your level of risk:

  • Is COVID-19 spreading in my community? The CDC’s latest COVID-19 information and map of states with reported COVID-19 infections can help you determine your risk.
  • What are the local orders in my community? Check updates from the OC Health Care Agency.
  • Will my activity put me in close contact with others? Practice physical distancing from anyone who doesn’t live in your home by staying 6 feet apart whenever possible. The CDC recommends wearing cloth face coverings in public. Choose outdoor activities and places where it’s easy to physically distance, like parks.
  • Am I, or is someone in my home, at risk for severe illness? If so, take extra precautions. Older adults and anyone with underlying health conditions can be at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19.
  • Do I practice everyday preventive actions? Continue to monitor for symptoms, staying home if you’re sick, practice proper handwashing and physical distancing, and wear a face covering in public.
  • Will I have to share items or equipment with others? Choose places where there is limited sharing of items and where any shared items are cleaned and disinfected between use.

See the CDC’s full guidance of venturing out safely.

My kids are worried about COVID-19. What can I do?
Check out these tips from a CHOC psychologist about reducing children’s anxiety about COVID-19. This comic book was developed to help kids understand COVID-19 and lessen their fears. The Orange County Health Care Agency has developed some kid-friendly infographics to help children understand what they can do to help stay well: English | Spanish

What should I do if I think my child has COVID-19?
Call your healthcare professional if your child has a fever, in addition to a cough or breathing difficulty, and has had close contact with a person known to have COVID-19, or you live in or have recently traveled to an area with an ongoing spread of the virus.

Do not go to the doctor’s office without calling first. Your provider will work with the local healthcare agency to determine whether testing is necessary.

Speak to a CHOC nurse 24/7 to answer your questions about COVID-19 and your child by calling 1-844-GET-CHOC (1-844-438-2462).

Parents who suspect their child may have COVID-19 should call their healthcare provider before going to the doctor’s office.

Can my child be tested for COVID-19?
If your child has a cough and fever, particularly with underlying health issues, call your doctor to discuss if testing is needed.

How is COVID-19 treated?
There is no specific antiviral treatment recommended for COVID-19. People with COVID-19 should receive supportive care to help relieve symptoms. For severe cases, treatment should include care to support vital organ functions.

What is the link between COVID-19 and MIS-C?
Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) is a condition where different body parts become inflamed, and many children with MIS-C have previously been diagnosed with or exposed to COVID-19. Scientists are still studying the correlation, but this Q&A with a CHOC pediatric infectious disease specialist answers parents’ most common MIS-C questions.

Can I transmit COVID-19 to my baby through breastmilk?
Current guidance from the CDC states that a mother who has been confirmed or suspected to have COVID-19 should take all precautions to avoid spreading the virus to her infant. Learn more here.

Can I transmit COVID-19 to my pets?
Until experts learn more about how this virus affects animals, treat pets as you would other human family members to protect them from a possible infection. The CDC offers the following guidance:

  • Do not let pets interact with people or other animals outside the household.
  • Keep cats indoors when possible to prevent them from interacting with other animals or people.
  • Walk dogs on a leash, maintaining at least 6 feet from other people and animals.
  • Avoid dog parks or public places where a large number of people and dogs gather.

There is a small number of animals around the world reported to be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19, mostly after having contact with a person with COVID-19. Talk to your veterinarian if your pet gets sick or if you have any concerns about your pet’s health.

If you have a confirmed or suspected case of COVID-19, limit contact with your pets, just like you would with people. If you must care for your pet or be around animals while you are sick, wear a cloth face covering and wash your hands before and after you interact with them.

Call your veterinarian with questions or concerns on your pet’s health before bringing them to the veterinary clinic.

Who can I call for more information about COVID-19?
Speak to a CHOC nurse 24/7 to answer your questions about COVID-19 and your child by calling 1-844-GET-CHOC (1-844-438-2463).

Also, the Orange County Health Care Agency is taking calls from the public about COVID-19. Call 800-564-8448 Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

This article was last updated on July 14, 2020.

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