Test your Brain IQ with this Brain Awareness Week Quiz

At what point does a headache become cause for concern? How rapidly and when does your child’s brain develop? The brain is a complex organ, and sometimes, it produces almost as many questions and it does thoughts (which is about 70,000 per day). To celebrate Brain Awareness Week, take this fun quiz to see how much you know about the brain:

  1. True or False- If kids and teens have headaches, they should automatically be referred to a specialist.
  2. True or False- A newborn’s brain is smaller than an adult’s brain.
  3. True or False- The most active time for brain development is during puberty, when adolescents are rapidly growing and changing.
  4. True or False- The brain is the most complex organ in the human body.
Dr. Mary Zupanc
Dr. Mary Zupanc, CHOC’s neurology division chair, and director of CHOC’s comprehensive epilepsy program.
  1. False- Headaches can occur for a number of reasons and are usually not a sign of a serious medical condition. Before seeking a referral to a neurologist from your pediatrician, first try:
    • Getting enough sleep
    • Drinking plenty of water
    • Eating regular, well-balanced meals
    • Exercising regularly
    • Stress relieving methods such as yoga or meditation
  2. True- At birth, a baby’s brain is one-quarter of the size of their mom or dad’s brain. It will double in size by their first birthday, and eventually weigh three pounds when it’s full grown.
  3. False- The period between birth and two years old is a very active time for brain development. Until puberty, brain development will use up almost half of the body’s daily energy intake. However, brains won’t fully develop until closer to age 25.
  4. True- The brain powers the nervous system, which affects and is affected by all the other systems in your body (cardiovascular, endocrine, gastrointestinal, and immune systems). It has 100 billion neurons- cells known as the gray matter which process information.

Learn more about the CHOC Children’s Neuroscience Institute, where pediatric specialists are providing expert care at the only pediatric neuroscience hospital in the region.

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Preventing and Treating Concussions

CHOC Children’s multidisciplinary team of concussion experts can help prevent and treat concussions, as well as help patients ease back in to school and sports. Careful supervision is essential for young persons with concussions, since their brains are still developing.

In this episode of CHOC Radio, Dr. Sharief Taraman, a pediatric neurologist, Dr. Jonathan Minor, a sports medicine specialist, Jenn Ahlswede, a speech language pathologist, and Mollee Oh, a physical therapist and rehabilitation supervisor, discuss:

  • SCAT3, an assessment tool parents and coaches can use immediately after an incident occurs
  • The film “Concussion,” and how concussions affect kids and teens differently than adults
  • Recommendations for cognizant and physical rest periods after sustaining a concussion

Hear more from CHOC experts in this podcast.

CHOC Radio theme music by Pat Jacobs.

CHOC Children’s Patient Gives Back: Juneau’s Story

Juneau Resnick Speech

At 8 years of age, Juneau Resnick experienced a life-changing event. A close family friend, Gina, passed away after a devastating battle with brain cancer. Gina had devoted her life to working with infants in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Juneau, who spent the first 40 days of her life in a NICU, developed a special bond with her. Owing to her prematurity, Juneau developed hydrocephalus necessitating numerous brain surgeries. After a series of difficult events, Juneau’s parents transferred her care to Dr. Michael Muhonen, medical director of The CHOC Children’s Neuroscience Institute.

To honor Gina and to thank Dr. Muhonen and the CHOC team who did so much to improve her health, Juneau and her teacher came up with the idea of a fundraiser to coincide with the 100th day of school. In addition to passing out flyers, Juneau spoke in front of 700 people at a school assembly. She shared her personal experience with CHOC, and made a plea for each student to bring in 100 coins. Combined with a baked goods and lemonade sale organized by Juneau, the students’ donations totaled almost $1,000.

“She is truly passionate about helping others. She has an unwavering passion that I’ve never seen before and I work with kids,” says Juneau’s mom Ai, a substitute teacher. “I’ve seen a lot, and she is a rare bird.”

Juneau remains dedicated to continuing to raise money for CHOC. Every month, she partners with her teacher to sell pencils, erasers and other supplies at school to support an initiative dubbed Kids and K9, benefitting a local animal shelter and CHOC.

“I’m doing it to make kids happy and put a smile on their faces,” said Juneau. “I want them to forget where they are and just have fun.”

The young philanthropist is grateful for her renewed health and so happy to be under the care of CHOC Children’s.

Learn how you can start your own fundraiser for CHOC.

Derek’s Story: A Landmark Procedure

Derek Young looked like any other baby when he was born in February 1994. But 3-1/2 months later, his mother Pamela noticed his head was slowly getting larger. Doctors diagnosed hydrocephalus, or fluid on the brain, and placed a shunt to drain the fluid. Fast forward 10 years when Derek needed a shunt revision. He was treated at the CHOC Children’s Neuroscience Institute and released.

CHOC Children's Neuroscience Institute

However, six months later, Derek returned to CHOC with what appeared to be a failure of the original shunt. Neurosurgeon Dr. Michael Muhonen decided to perform a pioneering procedure called a third ventriculostomy in which he made a tiny hole in the wall of the third ventricle of the brain — allowing movement of fluid out of the blocked ventricle.

As a result of this extraordinary surgery, Derek no longer required a shunt nor did he or his mother need to live in constant fear of shunt failure. An avid swimmer, this procedure allowed him to continue to pursue his passion, including completing a Catalina-to-Long-Beach swim to raise money for CHOC.

Derek is now a 6’2” 20-year-old junior at Northern Arizona University studying to be an emergency room or intensive care unit nurse, a career directly inspired from his experience with CHOC. From the compassionate, skilled nurses who made him laugh to the expert, encouraging doctors who described the procedure in terms he could understand, Derek’s experience with CHOC was life-changing.

Learn more about CHOC Children’s Neuroscience Institute.

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Meet Dr. Muhonen

Dr. Michael Muhonen, neurosurgeon and medical director of the CHOC Children’s Neuroscience Institute, strives to make sure that his team is always ready to employ the most innovative techniques using state-of-the-art equipment. His goal is to use non-invasive procedures, and, in cases where standard therapies aren’t available, to pioneer new ones, focusing on optimizing patient outcomes from surgery.

“There is less trauma to normal tissue when we can remove a three-inch tumor from a one-inch opening instead of a seven-inch opening,” explains Dr. Muhonen. “This is accomplished by aggressively using brain endoscopes and the newest stereotactic devices. We are also developing techniques to make incisions in the eyebrow, and to work under and around the brain rather than through it. We do everything we can to minimize pain, recovery time and physical evidence of surgery.”

Dr. Muhonen

But along with leading-edge surgical techniques and innovative procedures come compassion and empathy for each of Dr. Muhonen’s patients and their families. After all, he’s not just a world-class neurosurgeon, he’s also a father. When a child comes under his care, he does whatever it takes to reassure the parents that their child is in good hands.

“I strive to treat my patients and their parents as though they were my own family,” says Dr. Muhonen. “They have easy access to my cell phone and pager numbers so they have a ‘security blanket.’ At CHOC, we are all part of one big family.”

And Dr. Muhonen and his colleagues wouldn’t have it any other way.

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