Meet Dr. Francois Lalonde

CHOC Children’s wants its patients and families to get to know its specialists. Today, meet Dr. Francois Lalonde, a board certified pediatric orthopaedic surgeon.

Dr. Francis Lalonde
Meet Dr. Francois Lalonde, a board certified pediatric orthopaedic surgeon at CHOC Children’s.

Q: What is your education and training?

A: I attended medical school at University of Toronto School of Medicine. I completed my orthopaedic surgery residency at the University of Ottowa, and a pediatric internship at Montreal Children’s Hospital/McGill University. I completed a pediatric orthopaedic surgery fellowship at both Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario/University of Ottawa, and San Diego Children’s Hospital and Health Center/University of California San Diego.

Q: What are your current administrative appointments?

A: I am president of the CHOC Orange medical staff; medical director of the hip program, CHOC Orthopaedic Institute, member of the CHOC board; and president of Adult & Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery medical group.

Q: How long have you been on staff at CHOC?

A: 11 years.

Q: What are your special clinical interests?

A: My clinical interests include infant, child, adolescent and young adult hip conditions (DDH, Perthes, SCFE, impingement); pediatric fractures and musculoskeletal injuries; pediatric foot conditions and reconstructive surgery; general pediatric orthopaedic conditions; limb lengthening; surgical treatment of bone deformity in osteogenesis imperfecta; and cerebral palsy.

Q: What are your most common diagnoses?

A: We see a variety of conditions, including forearm and elbow fractures; developmental dislocation of the hip in infants; Perthes disease; slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) condition of the hip; joint, extremity pain in children, adolescents (overuse, growth related); idiopathic adolescent scoliosis; among others.

Q: Are you working on any current research?

A: Yes, on Legg-Calve-Perthes research. We are looking at our five year experience with patients treated with open hip adductor lengthening, range of motion, nighttime orthosis and limited weight bearing protocol. Our patients have maintained femoral head sphericity and containment with congruent hip joint with very limited surgery. Many patients have been back to sports without any symptoms.

Q: What are some new programs or developments within your specialty?

A: Orthopaedic surgeons are better able to diagnose hip impingement based on radiographic and imaging assessment and depending on severity of underlying findings or condition, treat this condition with arthroscopy or surgical hip dislocation with femoral head/neck osteochondroplasty and/or acetabular rim trimming. In doing so, we are better able to differ the onset of premature degenerative changes (arthritis) of the hip.

Advanced hip joint preservation surgical techniques such as the Ganz periacetabular ostetomy and relative femoral neck lengthening have emerged to treat the sequelae of developmental dysplasia of the hip and other childhood conditions. In the appropriate setting, these surgical techniques are able to relieve hip pain and significantly delay or prevent the onset of premature degenerative changes (arthritis) of the hip.

A modular magnetic intramedullary nail (Precise nail) is now available to allow orthopaedic surgeons to lengthen the femur or tibia by up to 8 cm in patients with moderate or large limb length inequality. This internal device is being better tolerated by patients with less soft tissue irritation.

In addition, for several years now, the Fassier-Duval telescoping intramedullary nail has been used at CHOC to correct severe deformities of the femur and/or tibia in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta. This modular implant which is anchored at the top and bottom telescopes as the bone grows and has helped avoid multiple revision surgeries in childhood due to migration of the implant and refracture.

Q: What would you most like community providers to know about your division at CHOC?

A: Our division covers the entire spectrum of subspecialties in pediatric orthopaedics (fractures, upper extremity, spine, hip, lower extremity, sports medicine, foot/ankle, bone tumours, neurosmuscular conditions – cerebral palsy, spina bifida, muscle disease, osteogenesis imperfecta, brachial plexus injury, concussion). We have three offices in Orange, Irvine and Mission Viejo, in addition to the CHOC Clinic. We try to see our referral patients promptly, and are accessible by phone for questions from physicians.

Q: What inspires you most about the care being delivered at CHOC?

A: I’m inspired by the expertise, drive and dedication of our physicians, nurses and support staff, as well as our state-of-the-art facility, the wide range of subspecialists within pediatrics, the emphasis on patient safety and experience, and the emphasis on delivering high-level quality care to our patients.

Q: Why did you decide to become an orthopaedic surgeon? 

A: I decided to become a doctor as a teenager. I had a part-time job as a lifeguard at local pools and beaches in Ottawa, Canada, in which I was required to take first aid courses, and that piqued my interest. Later, while attending university, I worked as a children’s swim instructor and gained interest in pediatrics and pediatric orthopaedics. I became interested in orthopaedic surgery as a medical student during a pediatric orthopaedic surgery rotation when I was exposed to a great role model.

In addition, my uncle, who is an obstetrician and gynecologist, was an early role model. I often listened to him talk about his work and schedule during the summer. I used to spend the entire summer at my parents’ cottage in the Laurentians in Quebec, Canada. My uncle’s cottage was right next door. I liked the diversity of his daily routine. His days were busy either seeing patients in his office for initial consultation or follow-up, or performing surgeries or delivering babies.

Q: If you weren’t a physician, what would you be and why?

A: I would have become a marine biologist. I became interested in this field by watching documentaries, taking biology classes, and by scuba diving.

Q: What are your hobbies/interests outside of work?

A: I enjoy playing ice hockey, as well as watching or attending all sports events.

Q: What have you learned from your patients?

A: I have learned that making funny noises when I examine babies’ hips really distracts them and elicits a smile and lets me conduct my exam more effectively and reliably. With older kids, I have learned how challenging it is to treat great athletes, who present with joint or extremity pain often from overuse, and they can find it difficult to commit to a period of rest, which is often necessary to allow for recovery.

Q: What was the funniest thing a patient told you? 

A: One of my patients keeps asking me, “Where is your gold tie?” The first time he met me I was wearing a gold tie. Every time he sees me now, he asks me about my gold tie. I keep asking him to call me the day before so that I can wear it on the day he comes but he keeps forgetting to call.

Watch a short video to learn more on Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease

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CHOC Included Among Nation’s Best Children’s Hospitals in U.S. News Survey

CHOC Children’s has been named one of the nation’s best children’s hospitals by U.S. News & World Report in its 2017-18 Best Children’s Hospitals rankings.

CHOC ranked in seven specialties: cancer, diabetes/endocrinology, neonatology, neurology/neurosurgery, orthopedics, pulmonology and urology, which earned a top 20 spot on the coveted list.

According to U.S. News, the Best Children’s Hospitals rankings were introduced in 2007 to help families of children with rare or life-threatening illnesses find the best medical care available.

The 11th annual rankings recognize the top 50 pediatric facilities across the United States in 10 pediatric specialties.

The U.S. News Best Children’s Hospitals rankings rely on clinical data and on an annual survey of pediatric specialists. The rankings methodology considers clinical outcomes, such as mortality and infection rates, efficiency and coordination of care delivery and compliance with “best practices.”

“At CHOC Children’s, we are steadfastly committed to delivering high-quality, safe and reliable health care to our patients,” said Dr. James Cappon, CHOC’s chief quality officer. “Recognition from U.S. News of our excellence in these seven subspecialties validates our efforts, but also provides our patients and families with even more assurance of our commitment to excelling in all areas of care.”

“The pediatric centers we rank in Best Children’s Hospitals deliver exceptionally high-quality care and deserve to be recognized for their commitment,” U.S. News Health Rankings Editor Avery Comarow said. “Children with life-threatening illnesses or rare conditions need the state-of-the-art services and expertise these hospitals provide every day.”

Learn more about survival rates, adequacy of nurse staffing, procedure and patient volume, availability of programs for particular illnesses and conditions and more. 

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Living with Scoliosis: Ellie’s Story

Ellie was a typical seventh grade student who enjoyed playing volleyball when, during a routine physical, her pediatrician noticed that one shoulder appeared to be a little higher than the other. Her mom was told to keep an eye on it, but since it was minor, not to worry. A few months later, minor back pain after a growth spurt lead her mom to discover a curve in Ellie’s back.  Another trip to the pediatrician soon followed.

Initially Ellie and her mom Gail thought the back pain might be due to carrying a heavy backpack around school every day. But Ellie’s pediatrician diagnosed her with scoliosis, and referred her to Dr. Afshin Aminian, director of the Orthopaedic Institute at CHOC Children’s.

scoliosis
Dr. Afshin Aminian, director of the Orthopaedic Institute at CHOC Children’s

“I wasn’t exactly happy about my diagnosis at the time,” says Ellie. “I was upset because I thought it would affect my daily life and I wouldn’t be able to do all the things I was used to doing, like playing volleyball, but Dr. Aminian helped me along the way and I grew into wearing my brace.”

The curve in Ellie’s spine was less than fifty degrees, and non-operative treatment was recommended. She received a custom-fit brace that would apply pressure to the areas where the spine was exhibiting deformity, in order to reverse the curvature and prevent it from getting worse.

“It made me more self-conscious and it made the little everyday things people take for granted more challenging, such as tying my shoes. But I learned to adapt, and even more than adapt, prosper. Time gave me the gift of wisdom to deal with my scoliosis; scoliosis gave me the gift of knowing challenges are inevitable but my defeat is optional,” she says.

An example of a Boston Brace, like the one Ellie wore.
An example of a Boston Brace, like the one Ellie wore.

Wearing the brace practically around the clock took a few weeks to get used to. The first few nights she slept in a sleeping bag on her bedroom floor because it was more comfortable for her back.

At the time, Ellie and her mom wondered if she’d be teased for wearing a brace every day.

“I didn’t know what scoliosis was before my diagnosis. We visited with a family friend who has scoliosis and she gave me great ideas about what clothing to wear with my brace, and now you can’t even tell when I’m wearing it,” she says. “I saw that she was doing well after wearing her brace every day, so I always knew that I would be as dedicated as she was, and wear mine every day, too.”

Long tank tops that were soft and comfortable, loose-fitting shirts, and skirts became wardrobe staples as Ellie tried to camouflage her brace. Because of how far her brace comes down her back, shirts that are a bit longer in the back also helped, she says.

scoliosis
Long tank tops are one way Ellie camouflaged her brace.

Hearing stories of other scoliosis patients who weren’t as regimented about wearing their braces reinforced for Ellie the importance of sticking to her brace regimen. She made special arrangements with her physical education teacher at school and her volleyball coach to change in private before class and practice because of her brace.

“Having scoliosis wasn’t Ellie’s first choice, but thanks to good support from her school, teammates and friends, she is thriving. Scoliosis just added a little complexity to things, and Ellie has mastered that very well,” says Gail, who helps Ellie tighten her brace after every time she puts it on and takes it off.

Thanks to Ellie’s dedication to wearing her brace every day, the curve in her spine drastically decreased, and she is now slowly able to decrease how often she needs to wear it, and in a few months, she will be brace-free.

“Scoliosis is 70 percent mental and 30 percent physical, so attitude is key,” Ellie says. “If you have a good attitude and are relentless in your bracing, you realize you sacrifice little for your future health.”

Ellie’s commitment to her care team’s plan was evident.

“Part of the reason Ellie’s bracing was so successful was due to her commitment to wearing her brace religiously, up to twenty two hours per day. She was disciplined and it paid off,” says Aminian.

Ellie’s hope for recently diagnosed scoliosis patients is that they would also prioritize their doctor’s orders over what other kids at school might tease them about.

“When I first got diagnosed and got my brace I was really scared and didn’t know what it would mean for me, but eventually you just get used to it, like braces. It’s uncomfortable at first, but every day it gets more normal,” she says. “It really works if you do it right, but you only get one shot at it. People shouldn’t worry too much about being teased but if they do, dealing with it makes you stronger in life.”

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Living with Scoliosis: Jessica’s Story

During a routine check for scoliosis during physical education class in seventh grade, a teacher noticed a slight curve in Jessica’s spine. A trip to her pediatrician soon followed. X-rays showed a thirty degree curve and since that was considered slight, follow-up imaging was recommended for a year later. By that time Jessica’s curve worsened by 15 degrees, and she was referred to Dr. Afshin Aminian, pediatric orthopaedic surgeon and director of the CHOC Children’s Orthopaedic Institute.

Bracing was initially recommended to try to prevent Jessica’s curve from getting worse.

“People my age don’t know that much about scoliosis even though it’s so common,” says Jessica. “I only had to wear my brace at night while I was sleeping, so no one ever really saw it or had the opportunity to tease me because of it, but they still asked questions, like was it comfortable or not.”

Although Jessica was vigilant about wearing her brace as instructed, her curve worsened by another twenty degrees, to nearly 70, and surgery was recommended. As a lifelong dancer, and a member of her high school’s competitive dance team, Jessica was initially worried that having surgery to correct this significant curve would affect her flexibility.

scoliosis
Jessica’s spine, before and after surgery.

“It’s very common for children or adolescent patients to be hesitant or even fearful when they first hear they need surgery,” says Dr. Aminian. “We encourage all of our patients to ask a lot of questions so they really feel like they are involved in their care team. We remind them that the team of orthopaedic surgeons at CHOC uses the very latest methods in a setting that’s specially designed for kids and teens, so they are in the best hands possible.”

Jessica’s surgery was ultimately set for winter break during her sophomore year of high school.

“All of my nurses were so impressed that I was up and walking the next day, but after I went home it was harder than I thought to move around” she said.

At a check-up with Dr. Aminian a few weeks later, Jessica was healing so well that she was able to return to school three weeks after surgery, as opposed to the three month break she had expected. Thanks to her flexibility as a dancer prior to surgery, she could even touch her toes at her follow up appointment, to the surprise of her care team.

Getting back into the groove of a full school day did not come without challenges. To protect her spine as it continued to heal, Jessica had to adjust to sitting for longer periods of time, something she slowly worked up to before returning to school. She also brought a small pillow to school to make her desk more comfortable, and made arrangements with teachers to keep textbooks in class so she didn’t have to carry them around.

“For an active person like me, not being able to bend, twist or lift anything for three months was hard, but in the end it made me thankful because my recovery was temporary, and overall I am really healthy,” she says.

Jessica knew she wanted to document her recovery phase, so she asked her mom to film some footage while she was in the hospital. That eventually morphed into a series of YouTube videos educating others on scoliosis, recovery tips, and sharing her own journey with the condition. When she was diagnosed, she knew others who had scoliosis, but no one’s curve was as severe as her own, so some peer-to-peer questions were left unanswered.

scoliosis
After her own successful scoliosis surgery, Jessica now imparts wisdom on other teens suffering from scoliosis.

“I want other scoliosis patients to know that it’s going to be hard, and you will have times when you can’t do something, but I promise it will get easier if you just go at your own pace and follow your doctor’s guidelines,” she says. “I love getting messages from people that watch my videos, thanking me for helping to calm their nerves before surgery.”

Filming these videos and helping other patients has helped to fill the void that dancing left. After losing one year of practice time due to surgery and recovery, Jessica decided not to go back to dancing.

“I’m busy in different ways now,” says Jessica. “Dancing provided great memories for me, but I’m on to a new chapter now.”

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Concussion Program Prescribes At-Home Exercises

Athletes and other adolescents with mild to severe concussions who experience symptoms such as dizziness, feeling unbalanced on their feet, blurred vision or trouble focusing on objects, may be good candidates for at-home visual and vestibular exercises recently designed by experts of the CHOC Children’s concussion program.

“Concussions are like puzzles, and every one is a little bit different,” says Dr. Jonathan Minor, a CHOC sports medicine specialist. “As many as fifty percent of concussed athletes may experience these symptoms and could benefit from these exercises that may get them back on the field or back in the classroom sooner.”

concussion exercises
Dr. Jonathan Minor models one of several at-home exercises recently designed by experts of the CHOC Children’s concussion program.

The convenient and self-explanatory exercises are ones that athletes and students can perform at home, but should only be started under the guidance of a concussion specialist, after an appropriate evaluation, and as part of an overall post-concussion treatment plan. These exercises are intended to enhance and improve a patient’s recovery from a concussion.

“Patients should be aware that beginning these exercises may stimulate some symptoms for a short period of time, such as trouble focusing, dizziness, nausea or headaches. But after just a few days of daily exercises, they may find that they can tolerate each exercise for a longer period of time,” says Minor, who is a lifetime athlete himself.

“We encourage our patients to only perform these exercises for the duration tolerated, rather than endure and push through worsening symptoms initially. Seeing a difference quickly with improved tolerance resonates especially with athletes, who are used to training and then seeing improved results.”

Download your copy of the vestibular/balance exercises and the visual concussion home exercises.

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New Orthopaedic Surgeon Places Patient- and Family-Centered Care First

A new orthopaedic surgeon with special training in orthopaedic trauma has joined the CHOC Children’s Orthopaedic Institute team. Dr. Jessica McMichael specializes in the care and treatment of fractures and a variety of pediatric musculoskeletal disorders, including limb and foot deformities, and cerebral palsy.

orthopaedic surgeon

A fierce advocate for families, Dr. McMichael strongly believes in treating patients and parents how she would want her own family to be treated.

“I like to take the time to listen to my patients and their families’ questions,” she explains. “I also know that if they’re at the clinic or hospital, they have probably taken time from work, school or other duties, and I want to show them that their time is valuable to me.”

Dr. McMichael approaches every parent interaction with her “mom hat” on.

“Being a mother changed me 100 percent. I always reinforce to parents that they know their child better than I do. I encourage them to listen to their intuition,” says Dr. McMichael, a mom to a toddler. “It’s about building a relationship with them.”

Dr. McMichael’s interest in orthopaedics started as a young girl. She remembers the exact moment. She idolized a friend’s older cooler sister, who shared that she was studying to be an orthopaedic surgeon. When Dr. McMichael learned what an orthopaedic surgeon did, she knew that’s what she wanted to do, especially if it meant being just like her idol.

Dr. McMichael earned her medical degree from Saint Louis University School of Medicine where she also completed her residency. She then served as an orthopaedic surgeon in the U.S. Air Force in Korea. Later, she provided trauma care training to military personnel as an adjunct faculty at the Center for Sustainment of Trauma and Readiness Skills in St. Louis, Missouri. Dr. McMichael completed her pediatric orthopaedic surgery fellowship at Shriners Hospitals for Children Northern California/UC Davis Medical Center.

It was during her fellowship at Shriners when Dr. McMichael became captivated by her young patients’ resilience.

“It was so invigorating to take care of someone who just wanted to play and get better,” she says. “It’s like kids are programmed to do well. That helps in their care and recovery.”

Dr. McMichael is working with the CHOC team to develop a multidisciplinary comprehensive bone health program, which would include conditions like osteogenesis imperfecta, a disorder characterized by brittle bones.

Dr. McMichael is a board-certified orthopaedic surgeon with the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgeons. She is a member of the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America, the Orthopaedic Trauma Association, and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

In her spare time, Dr. McMichael enjoys spending time with her husband and daughter, reading, camping, and participating in any Disney-related activities.

Learn more about the CHOC Children’s Orthopaedic Institute.  

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Cheerleading Safety Tips

Cheerleading is a physically demanding sport, much like ballet or gymnastics. Sports medicine specialists at CHOC Children’s regularly treat common sports injuries like ankle sprains and tendinitis, but say athletes may be overlooking some of the more serious injuries, and ways to avoid them, according to Dr. Jonathan Minor.

Dr. Jonathon Minor

Stress fractures in the feet, shins and back, herniated discs, spinal cord and vertebral injuries, elbow and shoulder dislocations, concussions and major fractures, are some of the other potential injuries athletes, parents and  coaches should be aware of and monitor for, says Minor.

Since each member of a cheer squad plays a unique role, they’re exposed to different potentials for injury. Flyers, bases and spotters rely on one another in teamwork to safely perform stunts and poses. One slip up could mean foot coming into contact with a teammate’s head leading to a concussion, or a fall to the ground with a major injury.

Like many other sports, youth cheerleaders spend many hours each week working together and developing teamwork that depends on a sense of trust and communication in order to perform with perfection. But this can often lead to overuse injuries, says Minor. Overuse injuries are becoming more common in youth sports because increasing pressure to compete at a higher level leads athletes to specialize in one sport at a younger age, as opposed to trying other activities in their off season. Learn how to prevent overuse injuries.

Much like gymnastics, running, diving, figure skating and dance, among other sports, there is an aesthetic look that the sport cultivates, such as low body weight and a slim build. The pressure of appearance and the rewards of recognition, says Minor, can promote unhealthy eating behaviors and disorders. This can lead to broken bones, stress fractures and muscle strains because bones and muscles don’t properly recover from stress and demands. Learn more about the warning signs of eating disorders.

Although cheerleaders can suffer serious sports injuries due to the physical demands they meet that are unparalleled in other sports, safety and proper education when performing stunts, as well as communication with teammates, is paramount to preventing these injuries.

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CHOC Children’s Expands Orthopaedic Services

Young athletes in Orange County now have greater access to specialized sports medicine care as a non-surgical sports medicine specialist joins the CHOC Children’s Orthopaedic Institute. Dr. Jonathan Minor specializes in ultrasound-guided injections and procedures, as well as diagnostic ultrasound evaluations, which provide improved visualization of the body tissues. The enhanced view, so to speak, along with dynamic tissue evaluation and use of selective injections can confirm the location of pain and assist with surgical decision-making.  Ultrasound-guided injections can offer a quicker recovery and may be used to avoid surgery altogether in some patients.

Dr. Jonathon Minor

Dr. Minor’s commitment to helping young athletes return to the field stems from his own lifetime experience as an athlete. As an adult, he has completed multiple marathons and Ironman triathlons, including three Long Course World Championship races with Team USA.

His passion for sports medicine was inspired by his father, an accomplished orthopaedic surgeon.

“I was moved by my dad being able to take an injury, and just like a carpenter, put it back together,” Dr. Minor said. “As a non-surgeon, I consider myself more like an architect, laying out a floor plan, and bringing together a team of providers to treat and safely return our athletes back to the sports arena.”

After medical school and residency training, he completed a non-surgical sports medicine fellowship and an additional musculoskeletal ultrasound fellowship at Boston Children’s Hospital. During his training in Boston, he served as team physician for several collegiate and high school teams, and worked closely with the Boston Ballet.

A chance to work with the expert team at CHOC and help expand the sports medicine program led Dr. Minor back to his native California. He treats everything from ankle and knee ligament sprains to overuse injuries and concussions.  Dr. Minor is working with the experts at the Orthopaedic Institute to expand the footprint of its sports medicine program with the addition of physical therapists, new regional physical therapy locations and a new orthopaedic surgeon, Dr. Jessica McMichael.

“Given the number and caliber of athletes coming out of Orange County, I am honored to be part of a growing and highly respected sports medicine program at the CHOC Children’s Orthopaedic Institute,” says Minor.

As an avid athlete, Dr. Minor is dedicated to injury prevention, particularly overuse injuries. He offers athletes of all ages the following tips to prevent sports injuries:

  • Stay committed to a progressive training program
  • In preparation for a new sport or season, make sure your body is conditioned aerobically before training with your team
  • Consistently stretch after a warm-up and again after exercise
  • With the exception of gymnasts and ice skaters, athletes should not specialize in a single sport until they are well into high school
  • While California offers a perfect climate for year-round single sport specialization, every athlete should spend 2-4 months every year outside of their primary sport; this could involve playing a sport that uses different muscle groups, or spending the time working with a personal trainer to optimize fitness and neglected muscle groups

Learn more about CHOC’s sports medicine program.

CHOC Experts Discuss Sports Injury Prevention

Early specialization and lack of diversity are more common in young athletes today and can increase the chances of injury, two CHOC Children’s experts tell “American Health Journal.”

A lack of rest and chronic repetitive stress can lead to overuse and injuries, say Dr. John Schlechter, a CHOC orthopedic surgeon, and Mollee Smith, a physical therapist at CHOC. Following an injury, CHOC clinicians work with both the child and the family to ensure proper healing and future injury prevention.

Learn more about sports injury prevention in “American Health Journal,” a television program that airs on PBS and other national network affiliates that reach more than 40 million households.

Each 30-minute episode features six segments with a diverse range of medical specialists discussing a full spectrum of health topics. For more information, visit www.discoverhealth.tv.

John Schlechter, D.O., attended medical school at the New York College of Osteopathic Medicine at the New York Institute of Technology. He completed his orthopedic surgery residency at Riverside County Regional Medical Center. He completed a pediatric orthopedic and scoliosis fellowship at Children’s Hospital San Diego as well as a post-fellowship preceptorship in sports medicine and arthroscopy at the Orthopedic Specialty Institute in Orange, Calif.

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Dr. John Schlechter Talks About Overuse Injuries in Children

In this CHOC Radio expert interview, Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgeon Dr. John Schlechter dropped by Seacrest Studios to talk about overuse injuries in children. Many children today are involved in sports and some kids even specialize in one type of sport at a young age. Repetitive use of the same bones and joints can cause stress on growing bodies and may result in injury. Dr. Schlechter talks about common overuse injuries, what causes them and how they are treated. He emphasizes that recovery is key and that kids need to recover slowly before they can get back into the game.

Dr. Schlechter is a board certified fellowship trained Pediatric Orthopedic Surgeon specializing in sports medicine and arthroscopy for children and adolescents.

Enjoy the show.

Click here for more CHOC Radio episodes.

Learn more about the CHOC Children’s Sports Program.