Meet Dr. Maryam Gholizadeh

CHOC Children’s wants its patients and families to get to know its specialists. Today, meet Dr. Maryam Gholizadeh, a pediatric surgeon. Dr. Gholizadeh attended medical school at George Washington University, and completed her residency at Eastern Virginia Medical School. She completed a pediatric surgery fellowship at Children’s National Medical Center in Washington D.C., and a pediatric surgical oncology fellowship at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York. She is currently the chair of pediatric surgery, and a member of the credentialing, medical executive and medical staff performance committees. She has been on staff at CHOC for 13 years.

Dr. Maryam Gholizadeh

Q: What are your special clinical interests?

A: All aspects of pediatric and neonatal surgery, surgical oncology and minimal invasive surgery.

Q: What are your most common diagnoses?

A: Appendicitis, hernias, lumps and bumps, as well as complex congenital pediatric and neonatal conditions.

Q: What would you most like community/referring providers to know about your division at CHOC?

A: As a general pediatric surgery division, we can take care of a variety of conditions such as hernias, hydroceles, gastrointestinal conditions requiring surgery, thoracic conditions, oncological problems requiring surgery such as neuroblastoma, Wilms’ tumor and teratomas.

Q: What inspires you most about the care being delivered here at CHOC?

A: We have a great group of specialists at CHOC who can deliver a high quality of care to our patients.

Q: Why did you decide to become a pediatric surgeon?

A: I decided to become a pediatric surgeon when I was a third year surgical resident on pediatric surgery rotation. Pediatric general surgery is the only field where you are able to take care of a variety of conditions. I found this field extremely rewarding, at the same time challenging.

Q: If you weren’t a physician, what would you be and why?

A: An athlete. I love the challenge, the discipline, and the fact you are always trying to do your best.

Q: What are your hobbies/interests outside of work?

A: Running, cycling, skiing and playing with my dogs.

Q: What was the funniest thing a patient told you?

A: There was a young child around 8-9 years old and we were going to remove his appendix with laparoscopy. I was standing on his left side because with laparoscopy we make our incision on the left side. Just before he went to sleep he looked up at me and said, “Why are you standing on my left? My appendix is on the right.” I was amazed at how knowledgeable this kid was!

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Meet Dr. Perry Eisner

CHOC Children’s wants its patients and families to get to know its specialists. Today, meet Dr. Perry Eisner, a pediatric anesthesiologist at CHOC Children’s at Mission Hospital. Dr. Eisner attended the Ohio State University School of Medicine. He studied pediatrics at the University of California Irvine including completing rotations at CHOC. He completed his pediatrics training at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center. After becoming board-certified in pediatrics, he completed a specialized program at UCLA including a general anesthesiology residency with a fellowship in pediatric anesthesia and pediatric critical care medicine. He has been the chief of surgery at CHOC Children’s at Mission Hospital for six years, and has been on staff at CHOC for over 20 years.

Dr. Perry Eisner
Q: What are your special clinical interests?

A: My interest is in making surgery as stress-free as possible for both my pediatric patients and their families.

Q: What are your most common diagnoses?

A: My patients have a range of conditions. We have everything from trauma patients with brain injuries or children with orthopaedic injuries to kids with head and neck problems. It runs the gamut.

Q: What would you most like community/referring providers to know about you/your division at CHOC?
A: At CHOC at Mission, we have four fellowship-trained pediatric anesthesiologists and ensure that children undergoing surgery have not only the safest but also the best experience possible. There is not a hospital in the county that provides a higher level of care.

Q: What inspires you most about the care being delivered here at CHOC?
A: What inspires me the most is the dedication of the entire team that CHOC Children’s has assembled to care for pediatric surgical patients. From the surgeons and the nurses to the critical care physicians and the hospital-based physicians, it is a team that cannot be matched. We have practitioners that were trained in the finest facilities in the country and who care not only about delivering state-of-the-art care, but also care equally about reducing the stress of an illness or surgery for both our patients and their families.

Q: Why did you decide to become a doctor?
A: I became fascinated with medicine when I was in high school and worked in an emergency room in downtown Cleveland as an orderly. I have also loved interacting with children. I found that when one works with kids, you can take a horrifying and stressful situation and transform it into a minor event. That is my goal each day in the operating room.

Q: If you weren’t a physician, what would you be and why?
A: Honestly, I don’t know. It’s all I’ve ever wanted. I didn’t have a back-up plan. It’s not something I’d recommend, but it’s not something that I did. I didn’t have a plan B.

Q: What are your hobbies and interests outside of work?
A: My hobby is playing racquetball. I began playing 40 years ago and play two to three times per week.

Q: What have you learned from your patients?
A: With kids, when they’re going through something stressful, I find that you can divert their attention by doing something that they think is funny or makes them laugh. I’ve learned though that this works for adults too. It seems so natural with kids, but it works just as well with adults as kids. When there’s something stressful going on, if you can divert your attention to something light or funny, it can get you through anything.

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CHOC Expands Pediatric Surgery Team, Expertise

The addition of a new CHOC Children’s pediatric surgeon with a unique expertise lays the groundwork for an expansion of CHOC’s surgical services for the smallest of patients.

While specializing in the full spectrum of pediatric surgery, Dr. Peter Yu has special expertise in the surgical treatment of babies before birth, and is working with hospital leadership to develop a multi-disciplinary fetal surgery program at CHOC in the near future.

Dr. Peter Yu

“I’m extremely happy to be at CHOC,” Dr. Yu says. “There is so much talent and potential here, as well as a pioneering spirit and willingness to undertake big things.”

Fetal surgery was uncharted territory about 30 years ago, Dr. Yu says. The following years, however, have seen many advances, including new techniques that allow surgeons to treat babies while in utero for conditions that are life-threatening or potentially debilitating.

With special training from the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, a pioneering institution in fetal surgery, Dr. Yu is determined to bring that level of expert care to CHOC and augment his team’s scope of services.

Also specializing in neonatal, thoracic and hernia surgery, Dr. Yu is board certified in general surgery, pediatric surgery and surgical critical care. Among his other goals are enhancing CHOC’s trauma program, advancing its minimally invasive surgery program, and furthering CHOC’s national reputation through quality patient care and innovative research.

As a medical student at the University of Missouri School of Medicine, Dr. Yu fell in love with the culture and technical aspects of surgery, as well as the potential to make sick patients better quickly.

“I realized that the best surgeons were kind, dedicated, hard-working and team players – traits that I really value,” he says. “When I discovered pediatric surgery, I felt it was a perfect fit for me.”

Dr. Yu completed his general surgery residency at UC San Diego, followed by a surgical critical care fellowship at Boston Children’s Hospital and a pediatric surgery fellowship at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. He is currently working on a master’s degree in public health from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

In his spare time, Dr. Yu enjoys spending time with his three children and his wife, an intensive care nurse. He also enjoys surfing, basketball and competitive swimming on a local U.S. Masters swim team.

Call 714-364-4050 to schedule a consultation with a CHOC pediatric surgeon.

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Breast Masses in Teen Girls: Cancer or Benign Tumors?

Breast masses can be a cause of concern for adolescent girls and their parents.  Fortunately, the majority of these masses are benign tumors, and breast cancer remains very rare among this age group. The size of the mass, however, and associated pain may warrant surgery, says Dr. Maryam Gholizadeh, CHOC pediatric surgeon.  A young patient who detects a mass should be seen by a surgeon to evaluate her options before getting a needle biopsy.

Dr. Gholizadeh has experienced an increase in patients with breast masses, which may point to girls being diligent with breast self-examinations.   The patients are healthy and are experiencing hormonal changes fairly common in adolescence.  All of them are incredibly anxious.

“These young girls, who vary in ages from 13 to 17, are of course very scared, as are their parents.  I spend a lot of time educating them and, should surgery be necessary, reassuring them,” explains Dr. Gholizadeh. “As a woman, I have empathy for what these girls are feeling about their bodies and work really hard to make them feel comfortable with me.”

Surgery to remove the mass is performed under general anesthesia—administered by a pediatric anesthesiologist—an outpatient basis, with no hospitalization required.   Dr. Gholizadeh takes great care to preserve the shape of the breast and to minimize scarring by placing incisions either under the breast or around the nipple.   Her patients are home within a few hours of arriving at CHOC.  Patients can usually return to school within 48 hours and resume activities after two weeks.

“These young ladies are eager to get back to school, sports and other activities, and don’t want to be slowed down.  My goal is to provide the best surgical outcome for them, including a quick recovery,” says Dr. Gholizadeh.

A recognized expert in her field, Dr. Gholizadeh specializes in all areas of pediatric and neonatal surgery. Her clinical interests include pediatric oncology, thoracic surgery and minimally invasive surgery. Dr. Gholizadeh is board certified in general surgery and pediatric surgery.  She can be reached at 714-364-4050.

Hernias in Children: What Parents Should Know

CHOC_HerniasSpotting a lump or bump on a child’s body would be scary for any parent, but mom and dad can rest assured: Hernias are common and their repair is among the most common procedures performed on kids, a CHOC Children’s pediatric general surgeon says.

Just in time for national Hernia Awareness Month, Dr. Mustafa Kabeer offers detailed information on this common ailment.

Hernias occur when part of an organ or tissue pushes through an opening or a weak spot in the abdominal wall and creates a protrusion which is visually present. Children with hernias are often born with them, and when a hernia is first noticed depends on when enough pressure is generated to allow other tissues to protrude through the weakened area, Dr. Kabeer says.

“Families or kids might see big or little bumps, and, in most cases, near the belly button or groin,” he says. “Sometimes in premature babies, we see hernias right when they’re born, and sometimes we don’t see them until the child is older.”

Though there are many varieties of hernias, Dr. Kabeer recommends that parents of young children make themselves aware of three types.

Epigastric hernias

First, epigastric hernias occur when a tiny portion of fat protrudes through the abdominal wall in the midline between the belly button and chest, creating a tiny bump a few millimeters wide.

“They can cause some discomfort and they don’t go away on their own,” Dr. Kabeer says. “When we find them, we fix them.”

Inguinal hernias

Secondly,inguinal hernias occur when part of a child’s intestine protrudes between the abdominal muscles and is seen as a bulge in the groin. Girls born with this type of hernia are more likely to have a protrusion on both sides.

This type of hernia is very common, especially in premature babies. This type of hernia should be repaired in a timely manner because, if left unfixed, they can cause discomfort and, on rare occasions, lead to the intestine being stuck in the hernia. This could cause obstruction and require a more urgent operation, says Dr. Kabeer.

“We want to fix these soon,” he says.

CHOC_Hernias2Umbilical hernias

Finally,umbilical hernias appear in babies born with a weakness in the belly button. This type of hernia is very common, and not something that should concern parents, Dr. Kabeer says.
Present when a baby cries, strains or coughs, these hernias cause no discomfort and rarely prompt larger problems, he says.

Dr. Kabeer estimates that 85 percent of umbilical hernias go away with time. That said, if a child still has a protrusion by age 3 or 4, CHOC surgeons will repair the hernia, Dr. Kabeer adds.

Physician can advise treatment

Parents who notice a hernia on their child’s body – particularly those near the groin or between the belly button and chest – should make an appointment with their pediatrician to help determine the type and course of treatment.

Though often harmless, some hernias prompt concern because the protruding organ or tissue can get stuck in the opening, which can compromise blood flow, Dr. Kabeer says. This can damage the protruding part, such as the intestines or even an ovary in girls.

Aside from the obvious bulge, symptoms of hernias can include pain and swelling. Babies who have an obstruction often exhibit abdominal distention, vomiting, redness and pain. If this occurs, parents should seek emergency treatment immediately, Dr. Kabeer cautions.

Short surgery, recovery

Should surgery be required to repair a hernia, the short procedure is performed under general anesthesia and requires no hospital stay, he says.

Recovery is also relatively fast following hernia repair surgery, Dr. Kabeer says. School-aged children are back to normal after about a week, and younger children recover even faster.

Learn more about surgery at CHOC Children’s.

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