CHOC Research Institute Makes a Mark

 

CHOC Research Institute Associate Ryan Roberts is working with a team of scientists to identify specific genetic markers for Sickle Cell Disease  and Thalassemia .

By carefully studying the genetic origins of pediatric disease, he is helping to pioneer new screenings and treatments for red cell abnormalities.

To learn more about The CHOC Research Institute, click here.

Our Research Institute is REALLY Cool

Watch as the Director of CHOC Research Institute Brent Dethlefs shows off some of the “cool” equipment we’ve got in our state-of-the-art research labs here at the hospital.

Scientists at the CHOC Research Institute use cryogenic freezers to store donated cord blood and bone marrow to be used for transplants in patients with oncology or hematology-related disease.

Want to know something else that’s pretty cool? Our seven cryogenic freezers are named after the seven dwarfs. That’s right—we rely on Sleepy, Happy, Dopey, Doc, Bashful, Sneezy and Grumpy to support these life-saving treatment options.

Watch the video and meet “Bashful.”

National Children’s Study Underway in Orange County

University of California, Irvine, in partnership with CHOC Children’s, the Children and Families Commission of Orange County and the Orange County Health Care Agency, was selected to conduct the National Children’s Study – the largest and most comprehensive long-term study of environmental effects on child development and health.

Since last October, more than 20 babies have been born into Orange County families recruited to participate in the National Children’s Study, which will follow more than 100,000 U.S. children from birth to age 21.

CHOC researchers expect to attend 250 births a year for the next five years, said Brent Dethlefs, director of the CHOC Research Institute. Biological samples will be collected for the duration of the study.

Researchers will also assess environmental factors to examine the effect on birth defects and pregnancy-related problems; behavior, learning and mental health disorders; asthma, obesity, among others. The study is expected to help form the basis of child health guidance, interventions and policy for generations to come.

To learn more about this exciting study, please click here: http://www.choc.org/publications/articles.cfm?id=P00303&pub=PC&aid=560