Meet Dr. Saeed Awan

CHOC Children’s wants its patients and families to get to know its specialists. Today, meet Dr. Saeed Awan, a pediatric general and thoracic surgeon. Dr. Awan attended medical school at Khyber Medical College, in Pakistan, and completed a surgery residency at Memorial University of Newfoundland & Labrador in Canada. He also completed two surgery fellowships, one at Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Edinburgh, in United Kingdom, and another at Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons in Canada. He has been on staff at CHOC for four and a half years.

Dr. Saweed Awan
Dr. Saeed Awan, pediatric general and thoracic surgeon at CHOC Children’s.

Q: What are your special clinical interests?

A: All aspects of pediatric and neonatal surgery, especially minimal invasive surgery. I also have expertise in liver and bile duct surgery and special interest in gastroschisis sutureless closure.

Q: What are your most common diagnoses?

A: Inguinal and umbilical hernias, hydroceles, undescended testes, appendicitis, lumps and bumps, as well as complex congenital pediatric and neonatal conditions.

Q: Are there any new programs or developments within your specialty (at CHOC or in the broader field)?

A: In the broader field, there has been remarkable advancement in minimally invasive surgical procedures with similar or better results than open surgical procedures.

Q: What would you most like community/referring providers to know about you/your division at CHOC?

A: We are a group of dedicated and highly trained pediatric surgeons who strive to provide excellent care to our patients. We make sure both parents and the patients are involved in the decision making. Being a father of four children, I treat my patients as I would like to have my own children treated.

In addition to our common surgical conditions, I treat complex neonatal and gastrointestinal conditions.

Q: What inspires you most about the care being delivered here at CHOC?

A: I’m inspired by our CHOC physicians, our excellent nursing and support staff, our wide range of subspecialists, as well as our state-of-the-art facility.

In our specialty, we meet a lot of children and the smiles on their and their parents’ faces after they have recovered from surgery, makes me very happy.

Q: Why did you decide to become a pediatric surgeon?  

A: I decided to become a pediatric surgeon when I was a third-year medical student. Pediatric general surgery is a field where you are able to take care of sick kids with a wide variety of surgical diseases. Although pediatric surgery is very challenging, it is very rewarding.

Q: If you weren’t a physician, what would you be and why?

A: I might have been a pilot as I like travel.

Q: What are your hobbies/interests outside of work?

A: Travel, soccer and spending time with my children.

Learn more about pediatric surgery at CHOC

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Skin Lumps: When Parents Should Worry

Noticing a skin lump on a child can be scary for parents, and it’s easy to automatically assume the worst. Fortunately, most skin lumps are benign and not a major cause for concern, according to Dr. Saeed  Awan, a pediatric general and thoracic surgeon at CHOC Children’s.

Some children are born with skin lumps, and some lumps appear later. The majority of patients with skin lumps will not have any other symptoms, but they can include pain, bleeding, redness, loss of appetite and night sweats. Surgery is often recommended in order to remove these skin lumps, to avoid the risk of infection.

VIDEO: Dr. Mutafa Kabeer, pediatric general and thoracic surgeon at CHOC Children’s, explains in why skin lumps occur in children and how they are treated:

Lymph nodes are the most common lumps that parent notice and worry about. Most parents find lymph nodes in the neck area but can also notice them around the ears and at the back of the skull.

“A pea-sized, rubbery node beneath the skin is nothing to worry about,” says Dr. Awan. “Healthy lymph nodes fluctuate in size- they grow and they shrink, but bad lymph nodes keep growing and are not subtle.”

A lymph node over one centimeter in diameter needs further investigation by a medical professional, especially when associated with loss of weight or appetite, fever or night sweats.

Dermoid cysts, another common lump, typically appear at the part of the eyebrow closest to the temple, but can occur in the middle (midline) of the neck or in the upper chest area. They are rubbery and the size of a pea. These cysts generally do not pose a hazard to your child’s health, but are typically removed to prevent infection. A midline dermoid cyst on the scalp needs more investigation from a pediatric surgeon.

Another common lump is pilomatrixoma, which usually appears on the face, neck or arms, and originates in the hair follicles. It usually manifests as a solitary, asymptomatic, firm nodule.

Hemangiomas develop in the skin when there is an abnormal buildup of blood vessels. This can occur at birth or shortly after. These lumps may increase in size during the first year and then go away on their own over the next three to four years. Most of these do not require surgery unless they are blocking the airway, vision or nostril. Lymphangiomas are rare, but are characterized by swelling on the side of neck.

Thyroglossal cysts are the most common cause of midline neck masses and are generally located just below the hyoid bone, yet these neck masses can occur anywhere along the path of the thyroid gland.

Branchial cysts and sinuses are swelling on the side of the neck. They are typically removed in order to prevent infection.  There are pre-auricular sinuses or skin tags. All of these need to be removed to prevent infection

If you see a skin lump on your child, consult your primary care doctor. If the lump changes size or color, or there is pain associated with the bump, or your child also experiences weight loss or appetite loss, night sweats or a fever, urgent evaluation and further investigation is needed.

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