Meet Dr. Nita Doshi

CHOC Children’s wants its patients and families to get to know its specialists— today, meet Dr. Nita Doshi, a pediatric cardiologist with expertise in fetal cardiology.

Dr. Nita Doshi, a pediatric cardiologist at CHOC Children’s with expertise in fetal cardiology.

Q: What is your education and training?

A: I attended medical school at University of California, Irvine. I completed my pediatric residency internship, categorical pediatric residency, and pediatric cardiology fellowship at University of California at Los Angeles Mattel Children’s Hospital School of Medicine.

Q: What are your special clinical interests?

A: Fetal cardiology, non-invasive cardiology including infant and pediatric transthoracic echocardiography, transesophageal echocardiography, pediatric pulmonary hypertension, and pediatric heart failure.

Q: How long have you been on staff at CHOC?

A: Eight years.

Q: What are some new programs or developments within your specialty?

A: My team provides state-of-the-art ultrasound technology and comprehensive fetal cardiac imaging protocol for evaluation and diagnosis of fetal cardiac disease. We offer the only comprehensive fetal cardiology services in Orange County, including performing fetal echocardiograms on pregnant women. When necessary, we partner with families on prenatal palliative care planning for specialized cases. We also support continuity of care of prenatal patients with their primary obstetrical and perinatology teams when appropriate.

Q: What are your most common diagnoses?

A: Atrial septal defect, ventricular septal defect, atrioventricular canal defect, bicuspid aortic valve and aortic valve stenosis, coarctation of the aorta, pulmonary valve stenosis, tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries, double outlet right ventricle, truncus arteriosus, pulmonary hypertension, and cardiomyopathy.

Q: What would you most like community/referring providers to know about you or your division at CHOC?

A:  I treat every patient and family as though they are my very own.  This connection is what has allowed to us create such an amazing network of heart families.  I am proud to serve as a member of a supremely talented and highly subspecialized team of cardiologists.

Q:  What inspires you most about the care being delivered here at CHOC?

A:  CHOC offers the ability for physicians such as me to serve a widely diverse patient population inside and outside of the county.  There is a unique and exceptional opportunity for one-on-one personalized care here at CHOC that doesn’t exist in other centers.  In this role, I am honored to learn from my patients and families every day, including aspects of their backgrounds, cultures, spectrum of disease, and their perspectives.  These are lessons that make me a stronger person and professional to support families in the future.

Q: Why did you decide to become a doctor?

A:  My parents are exceptional role models.  They remind me to this day that when I was eight years old, I informed them I wanted to take care of babies and their hearts.  They are still not quite sure from where the specific inspiration stemmed (perhaps because they are also in the health profession), but they said that I was determined to follow through on this goal, and I did.

Q: What are your hobbies/interests outside of work?

A:  My two year old daughter and my husband are my life.  We play, cook, travel, and explore every aspect of the outside world together.  We pride ourselves on learning every trade possible that enhances our lives.  We have remodeled our entire home with our own bare hands, cook our meals from scratch, and thoroughly enjoy every aspect of creative design (event planning and decorating and all things arts and crafts).

Q: What have you learned from your patients, or what is the funniest thing a patient has ever told you?

A:  One of the funniest moments was when my 4 year old patient being wheeled into the operating room to undergo a heart transplant asked me if they could put “mac n’ cheese” in her IV.

Learn more about fetal cardiology services at CHOC Children's

Related posts:

  • Catching a Heart Defect in Utero: Marco’s Story
    Meagan and Dante Cipulli quickly settled on a name when they discovered their third baby would be a boy: Marco, which means God of War.That name would become especially fitting ...
  • Meet Dr. Wyman Lai
    Just in time for American Heart Month, meet Dr. Wyman Lai, a nationally-recognized pediatric cardiologist with expertise in fetal cardiology and non-invasive imaging for heart disease in fetuses, and children ...

CHOC’s VP of Human Resources Joins Cast of Footloose Follies

One of Orange County’s most popular fundraisers, CHOC Follies, is back March 29-31 with their newest musical production, “Footloose Follies,” benefiting CHOC Children’s. Set against an 80s backdrop, the humorous toe-tapping show, featuring a cast of local social and business leaders, is sure to be fun for the whole family.

We talked to Tom Capizzi, CHOC’s vice president of human resources, about his role in the upcoming show.

Tom Capizzi, CHOC’s vice president of human resources

Q: How long have you been at CHOC?

A: I have been with CHOC two and a half fantastic years.

Q: How did you get involved with the show? Why is this important to you?

A: I have been a fan of the Follies for many years. I always felt it would be great to be a part of the production and give back as a senior leader at CHOC. In my role, I am always in front of many associates and love the opportunity to speak to as many people as I can. This year I decided, “Why not; let’s do it!”

Q: Did you have any experience with theater prior to the CHOC Follies?

A: I did some theater while in college, and later when my daughter was in a children’s regional theater group I was asked to participate in several adult parts.

Q: What is your favorite part of the show?

A: The cast brings such energy and passion to the show, which in my opinion is very infectious and speaks to our mission and why we all are aligned – associates, physicians, donors and volunteers – with our mission to nurture, advance and protect the health and well being of children.

Q: Why should the community support the show?

A: Join us, it’s a wonderful time, very entertaining. And the dedication, passion and time commitment that the cast makes every year, which is all voluntary, speaks volumes to how important CHOC is to them and how critical philanthropy is to the success of our mission to care for our community’s children and their families.

Celebrate decades of singing and dancing for OC's kids. Buy your tickets now.

Related posts:



Meet CHOC’s Newest Family Resource Center Coordinator

Meet Rose Ovalle, the new coordinator of CHOC’s Family Resource Center (FRC), a space where patients and families can read and take home books, rent movies, play games, utilize a computer lab, research their child’s diagnosis with medical and developmental literature, and decompress with arts and crafts.

Q: What are your responsibilities as coordinator of the Family Resource Center?

A: I oversee the daily operation of the FRC, including coordinating and developing activities and events that ultimately provide comfort and education. This entails acting as a liaison to volunteers and working with them to meet specific patient and family needs. Ultimately my position is to support patients and families with their emotional and social needs with compassion and kindness.

Q: How does your position support CHOC’s commitment to patient and family centered care?

A: As the FRC coordinator, I assist patients and their family members while in the inpatient and outpatient settings. If you are a patient or family member and just need a place to relax, or you’re looking to pick out a new children’s book, perhaps searching for a distraction from the patient room to make crafts, or to join us for story time, we are here for you. We encourage patients to engage with our wonderful FRC volunteers who look forward to interacting, listening and supporting our amazing patients and families at CHOC. If you are a parent, please visit our business center should you have any computing, fax, or copy needs, or need resources to help you navigate the challenges of your child’s diagnosis or injury, or just to reach out with whatever needs should arise. Through an open and active dialogue that occurs daily I, along with our dedicated volunteers, strive to personalize how best to serve the individual needs of each patient and family.

Q: What inspired you to pursue a career at CHOC Children’s?

A: I have had the experience of having a child in the NICU, and the fortunate experience of having that sick child cared for by the committed staff at CHOC. My son Elijah, had a serious virus when he was only weeks old. He was on a ventilator for some time, in the NICU, and there were many times we thought we would lose him. Were it not for the amazing CHOC physicians, nurses and staff, I don’t know how our family would have made it through such a difficult time. Elijah is now 15 years old, plays basketball and loves to write stories. He continues with his CHOC neurology outpatient treatment with Dr. Daniel Shrey and his staff, and they have always provided thoughtful and supportive care. This experience has certainly given me valuable insight and empathy in my interactions with other families going through similar experiences.

Q: What excites you about working at CHOC Children’s?

A: I know what it feels like to be scared and desperate in the face of having a sick child—it’s the worst feeling imaginable and can be disorienting without proper support. Providing a refuge for patients and families, where they can momentarily lose themselves in a book, or in a conversation with a volunteer, is a help; and for some, it can make quite a difference. In addition, providing resources to educate parents on their child’s diagnosis or injury helps keep them informed and part of the care plan. Being part of that process is not just exciting, it’s an amazing privilege to support these families and help them get through these challenging times.

Q: What do you want patients and families to know about the Family Resource Center?

A: We are in the Bill Holmes tower, on the second floor, open Monday through Friday 11:00 am to 7:00 pm. We’d love for patients and families to join us for story time every Wednesday at 1:00 pm. Please come by, we would love to meet you and your child if possible. If your child is unable to come by, feel free to pick out a brand-new book for them! Our volunteers are waiting and ready to be of assistance.

To reach the Family Resource Center, please call 714-509-9168.

Related posts:

  • Meet Dr. Nita Doshi
    CHOC Children’s wants its patients and families to get to know its specialists— today, meet Dr. Nita Doshi, a pediatric cardiologist with expertise in fetal cardiology.
  • CHOC’s VP of Human Resources Joins Cast of Footloose Follies
    One of Orange County’s most popular fundraisers, CHOC Follies, is back March 29-31 with their newest musical production, “Footloose Follies,” benefiting CHOC Children’s.
  • Longtime CHOC Pediatrician Retires
    Throughout more than four decades of practice, Dr. Michael Shannon of Sea View Pediatrics has treated thousands of Orange County children. Many families in Orange County have had generations of ...

Longtime CHOC Pediatrician Retires

Dr. Michael Shannon can’t walk through the lobby of Sea View Pediatrics without at least one parent coming in for a hug.

After nearly 45 years in pediatric health care in Orange County, he’s earned more than a few fans – and the respect is mutual.

“Much of what a pediatrician learns is after training,” Dr. Shannon says.

Bring on the hugs though: At the end of this month, the 73-year-old will retire, completing a career that has spanned more than four decades and thousands of patients.

Born in Kansas, Dr. Shannon crisscrossed the country as a youth and young adult before ultimately attending medical school at Northwestern University in Illinois.

Dr. Shannon pursued a career in medicine following a childhood with frequent visits to doctors’ offices.

“I had bad allergies as a kid, an early tonsillectomy, a hernia at 7, appendicitis and asthma,” he says. “I was in the doctor’s office quite a bit. My parents seemed to like him, so I thought that would be a good thing to do.”

When it came to choosing his specialty, Dr. Shannon settled on pediatrics because he enjoyed the innocent nature of children.

“I always liked kids. Children don’t judge you, and their charts were really thin,” he says with a laugh.

When it came time for his residency and internship, Dr. Shannon and his wife, who’d long grown tired of cold Midwestern winters, headed west to California.

Ultimately, the pair settled in Orange County, where Dr. Shannon began a private pediatrics practice in July 1973. He practiced near Mission Hospital until 1995, when he joined Sea View Pediatrics, now a part of the CHOC Children’s Network.

Over more than four decades of practice, Dr. Shannon has treated thousands of Orange County children.

“I remember him being a cool doctor,” says Steve Concialdi, a patient of Dr. Shannon’s as a child and who is now a captain with the Orange County Fire Authority. “He was hip and he was fun.”

Steve Concialdi with Dr. Michael Shannon, who cared for him as a child and now cares for the next generation of Steve’s family.

The doctor reached an icon status for a young Steve when he was about 10. He’d been battling a cold and his mother thought he should skip a school whale watching trip. After hearing Dr. Shannon’s opinion, mom Bonnie was swayed and Steve went on the trip.

“I went and I had a blast,” he says. “I ended up throwing up, but that’s because I got sea sick. But I just remember as little boy, what a cool doctor he was. We saw Dr. Shannon for years.”

And so, when Steve and his sister, Carrie, started their own families, Dr. Shannon was a clear choice for their children’s pediatrician – and Bonnie agreed.

Dr. Shannon with Gracie Concialdi at her first appointment; her father, Steve Concialdi; grandmother, Bonnie; and her brother, Andy Concialdi.

“I told them, you’ve got to go to Dr. Shannon,” she said. “I wouldn’t stand for anyone else. I went to their first appointments too. I wanted to see Dr. Shannon because I missed him.”

The Concialdis are just one of many families in Orange County that have had generations of children see Dr. Shannon. The phenomenon is a testimony to Dr. Shannon’s long career and strong relationships with his patients and families.

And that bond was never more evident than in March 2011, when he was seriously injured in a car accident. His patients and families – past and present – showed an outpouring of concern for him during a long recovery period.

The swell of support clarified for Dr. Shannon the impact his career had made on patients and families.

“The accident made me feel even more than ever before that I didn’t want anything happening to my babies,” he says of his patients.

And now, nearly seven years later, Dr. Shannon says he’s ready to hang up his stethoscope and entrust the care of his babies to the other Sea View physicians.

Dr. Shannon plans to spend his retirement traveling and focusing on his grandchildren. His future trips include travel to Louisville, Ky., to visit his daughter, Vanessa, and Ireland and Spain.

Looking for a pediatrician? Find one near you.

Related posts:

From CHOC Neurosurgery Parent to CHOC Chaplain

The first time Chaplain Steve came to CHOC Children’s, he had just found out his daughter Catie needed an emergency neurosurgery. Now, he’s back for good― as the newest chaplain on CHOC’s spiritual care team.

Chaplain Steve and Choco Bear
Chaplain Steve is the newest member of CHOC’s spiritual care team. But first, he was a CHOC parent.

Ever since pre-school, Catie had experienced difficulties with body awareness, some motor skills, coordination, attentiveness in school and other challenges that didn’t seem to fit her developmental stage.

For five years, Steve and his wife Claudia explored everything: psychiatry, ophthalmology, behavior modification, medication, coaching, neurofeedback and more. Finally, when she was 8 years old they advocated for a referral to a pediatric neurologist, rule out the possibility that there was something wrong with her brain. Even though Catie didn’t show any of the physical symptoms typically associated with a mass in her brain, such as headaches, seizures, fainting or major motor problems, their neurologist ordered an MRI just to be safe.

After five years of trying new therapies and hitting dead ends, Steve and Claudia didn’t know what to expect from Catie’s MRI results, or if they were finally about to get answers.

Catie’s scans revealed that she had a large arachnoid cyst in her brain. The fluid-filled sac measured 10 centimeters, about the size of a baseball.

“I was in shock” Steve says of the moment his wife called him with the results. “I remember exactly where I was and exactly what I was doing at that time. I remember begging my wife, “Please tell me you’re kidding. Please tell me you’re kidding.”

Dr. William Loudon, a pediatric neurosurgeon at CHOC Children’s came to The Julia and George Argyros Emergency Department to meet the family, who was trying to process a lot of information at once.

Dr. William Loudon CHOC pediatric neurosurgeon
Dr. William Loudon, a pediatric neurosurgeon at CHOC Children’s.

“He told us that this was serious, but that they were going to take care of it right away,” Steve recalls. “He explained very clearly what he was going to do to drain the cyst and how he was going to do it.”

Steve and Claudia didn’t understand how a cyst could have been growing for years inside her skull undetected.

“Although Catie hadn’t yet shown physical side effects, she inevitably would have begun to decompensate, which would’ve greatly increased her risk of injury,” said Dr. Loudon.

Since Catie is the oldest child in her family and the first to undergo a major surgery, her parents were naturally worried, about everything from anesthesia to recovery

“Dr. Loudon told us that he would care for our daughter as if she were his own child,” Steve says. “Since working at CHOC, I’ve heard him tell other families in the emergency department the same thing. I know that he means it every time.”

Dr. Loudon performed a series of surgeries to open the cyst and allow it to drain internally, a procedure known as endoscopic cyst fenestration. He made a small cut in her skull and then punctured a tiny hole on either side of the cyst to allow the fluid to drain internally over a period of time.

Dr. Loudon’s commitment to Catie’s safety was deeply appreciated by her parents.

“I saw the way his team acted, and how they interacted with my daughter,” Steve recalls. “Dr. Loudon takes his job very seriously and he goes after the problem. We knew she was in good hands.”

Catie recovering from neurosurgery at CHOC
Catie recovering from neurosurgery at CHOC

With every hospital stay, Steve found that his own natural instinct was to offer support to other parents, whether it be in the waiting room or the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). By this point, Steve had been a chaplain in a hospice setting for six years.

“Even while we were the ones receiving care, my first reaction was always to rush to other families in need, but since I was there as a parent, there was only so much I could do,” he says.

Now that Chaplain Steve has officially joined the spiritual care team at CHOC, he is able to offer spiritual and emotional support to patients and families.

“I have my own beliefs and faith traditions, but these come secondary to what a family needs in a time of crisis,” Steve says.

Today, Catie is a high school student who loves science, space and kids. She hasn’t been hospitalized since her last surgery, although a few years ago she came back to CHOC with a broken foot that she got “pretending to be a ninja,” as her dad says. She still treasures the Choco bear that she received when she was a patient, but sometimes loans him to her little brother if he’s feeling under the weather.

Chaplain Steve and family
Catie’s family is happy to report that she has not been hospitalized in the last five years.
Learn more about neurosurgery at CHOC

Related posts: