Medication Safety Tips for Summer Camp Counselors and Caregivers

Summer camp counselors, caregivers and family members alike, can rest assured with these medication safety tips for children under their care. Read below to make sure you’re asking the parent/guardian the right questions about their child’s medications:

• Review the child’s complete medication list with the child’s parent/guardian.
This includes which medications are scheduled (For example:  to be given twice daily at 9 a.m. and 9 p.m.) vs. which medications are only to be given as needed. For as needed medications, make sure you fully understand when it is appropriate to give. For patients with asthma, ask if they have a copy of their asthma action plan.


• Do any medications need to be taken with food or on an empty stomach?

• Can I crush any of these tablets? Do not crush extended release, controlled release or sustained release medications.

• Will any devices be needed to administer the medications?
For example: a spacer will be needed for an inhaler.

• Do any of the medications need to be stored in special conditions such as the refrigerator?

• How do I measure an oral liquid?
For oral liquids, make sure the dose is written in both mg and mL so that you understand how to draw up the dose correctly with an oral syringe. Ask the parents to bring the oral syringe and bottle adapter provided by the pharmacy. Avoid using a measuring cup or household teaspoon/tablespoon as this is not an accurate measurement.

• What is the duration of each medication and do they have stop dates?
For example: if the child is supposed to get seven days of antibiotic, how many days left do they need to take it?

• What are the common side effects your child experiences on these medications?

Lastly, make sure you have a contact number for the family, provider and the Poison Center Hotline (800-222-1222) should any questions arise.

Learn more about pharmacy services at CHOC.

 

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5 Top Summer Safety Tips

CHOC summer safetySummer is in full swing. Have a fun and safe season with these summer smarts!

1. Always supervise children while in or near water, even a shallow wading pool or the tub. Check with local hospitals and the American Red Cross for a CPR class near you. Drowning is preventable.

2. Never leave your child alone in a car, not even for a minute. No exceptions.

3. Limit sun exposure during peak hours – between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Don’t forget the sunscreen.

4. Keep hydrated. Remind your little ones to drink plenty of water throughout the day, and to not wait until they’re thirsty.

5. Check for hidden hazards at the playground. Look carefully for razor blades, broken glass or insects. Teach kids to identify and avoid plants like poison ivy.

 

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Protect Your Little Ones from Excessive Sun Exposure

Before Melanoma/Skin Cancer Detection and Prevention Month comes to a close, be sure to remind your kids and loved ones that excessive sun exposure and improper protection can increase the risk for skin cancer. Check out these tips to ward off those harmful UVA and UVB (ultraviolet radiation) rays:

For babies under 6 months —

  • Avoid sun exposure.
  • Dress infants in brimmed hats that protect the face and neck adequately, lightweight long pants and long-sleeved shirts.
  • When adequate clothing and shade are not available, parents can apply a minimal amount of sunscreen with at least 15 SPF (sun protection factor) to small areas, such as the infant’s face and the back of the hands.
  • Should an infant get sunburn, apply cool compresses to the affected area.

For all other children —

  • Stay in the shade whenever possible, and limit sun exposure during the peak hours – between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
  • Wear a hat with a three-inch brim, sunglasses (with 97-100% protection against both UVA and UVB rays), and clothing with a tight weave.
  • Apply enough sunscreen — about one ounce for each area of exposed skin, i.e. leg or arm. Be sure to reapply it every two hours, or after sweating or swimming.
  • Use extra caution near water as it reflects UV rays and may result in sunburn more quickly.

Learn more about melanoma – the most common and life-threatening form of skin cancer.

Download this CHOC sun safety tip sheet and post in your home.

 

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