Protect Your Child With Vaccinations

National Infant Immunization Week (April 21-28) is coming up, and highlights the importance of protecting infants from vaccine-preventable diseases. This important campaign is a call to action for parents, caregivers, and healthcare providers to ensure that infants are fully immunized against 14 vaccine-preventable diseases, such as influenza, hepatitis, pertussis, and more.

In the United States, vaccines have reduced or eliminated many infectious diseases that once routinely killed or harmed thousands of infants and children each year. However, the viruses and bacteria that cause vaccine-preventable disease and death still exist and can be passed on to people who are not immunized. These diseases result in doctor visits, hospitalizations, and even death.

To help protect your child, be sure to talk to your child’s pediatrician to ensure that your little one is up-to-date on his immunizations.

For a schedule of recommended immunizations for children from birth to six years old, from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, please click here: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/downloads/parent-ver-sch-0-6yrs.pdf

For an adolescent immunization schedule, or to learn more, please click here: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/schedules/default.htm

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Vaccines Are Necessary and Effective

An article published by the New York Times this week, reported that a new study found that although most parents believe that vaccines protect their children against disease, one in four think some vaccines cause autism in healthy children. Additionally, nearly one in eight have refused at least one recommended vaccine.

Vaccines are necessary — and effective, says Maria Tupas, M.D., medical director of the CHOC Primary Care Clinics. “For more than 50 years, vaccines have saved the lives of millions of children,” she says. “Most childhood vaccines are 90 percent to 99 percent effective in preventing disease. And if a vaccinated child does get the disease, the symptoms are usually far less serious.”

Dr. Tupas explains that the alleged link between the MMR vaccine and autism has been vigorously studied and disproved by extensive and well controlled studies, including those by the Institute of Medicine and Centers for Disease Control.  Current research on autism points to multiple factors, including the possibility of a genetic component or exposure to toxins or viruses during pregnancy. The increase in autism diagnoses may be at least partially attributed to pediatricians simply becoming better at recognizing symptoms at earlier ages.

As children with autism spectrum disorders benefit from early intervention and behavior modification, Dr. Tupas advises parents concerned about possible symptoms to contact their pediatrician.

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