Drs. Sharief Taraman, Jonathan Romain Discuss Concussions

Even minor concussions can cause lingering symptoms, two CHOC Children’s specialists tell “American Health Journal.”

Concussions can cause physical effects like headache and nausea, as well as emotional symptoms such as irritability and easy frustration, say Dr. Sharief Taraman, a pediatric neurologist, and Dr. Jonathan Romain, a neuropsychologist.

Learn more about concussions, including prevention, in “American Health Journal,” a television program that airs on PBS and other national network affiliates that reach more than 40 million households.

Each 30-minute episode features six segments with a diverse range of medical specialists discussing a full spectrum of health topics. For more information, visit www.discoverhealth.tv.

Sharief Taraman, M.D., attended medical school at Wayne State University School of Medicine and went on to complete residency training in pediatrics and pediatric neurology at the Children’s Hospital of Michigan. Jonathan Romain, Ph.D., completed his pre-doctoral internship at Franciscan Hospital for Children in Boston and a two-year APA accredited fellowship in pediatric neuropsychology at Medical College of Wisconsin.

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Dr. Nguyen Pham Addresses Choking Hazards, Prevention

Choking is the leading cause of death and injury among children, particularly in children ages 3 and younger, a CHOC Children’s otolaryngologist tells “American Health Journal.”

Food, toys and coins are the primary causes of choking in children in this age group, says Dr. Nguyen Pham. Spherical toys are of particular concern, as are latex balloons. Hotdogs, grapes and nuts are especially dangerous foods, Dr. Pham says.

Learn more about choking hazards, including prevention and treatment, in “American Health Journal,” a television program that airs on PBS and other national network affiliates that reach more than 40 million households.

Each 30-minute episode features six segments with a diverse range of medical specialists discussing a full spectrum of health topics. For more information, visit www.discoverhealth.tv.

Nguyen Pham, M.D., attended medical school at UC Irvine, and then completed his internship and residency in otolaryngology at the UC Davis Medical Center in Sacramento. He conducted his fellowship in pediatric otolaryngology at Stanford University in Palo Alto.

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Watch CHOC’s Telemedicine in Action

Thanks to CHOC Children’s telemedicine efforts, physicians can remotely care for children from miles away, or even while a patient is riding in an ambulance.
In this video, Dr. Jason Knight, a critical care specialist and medical director of CHOC’s Emergency Transport Services, discusses how CHOC physicians and the transport team use telemedicine to improve care of children.
Watch for a demonstration of this remarkable technology that is advancing how CHOC physicians practice, and aiding CHOC’s ability to care for children beyond Orange County.

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A Bright Future: Pacer’s Story

There’s no shortage of cool patients in these parts, and I just met another who has CHOC to thank for a bright future.

Pacer’s first family meal didn’t happen until he was 4 years old. Until then, he ate through a feeding tube, never experiencing a Thanksgiving feast, Halloween candy or birthday cake. But thanks to his commitment and five weeks of treatment at CHOC’s Multidisciplinary Feeding Program, Pacer learned to eat, and now he can down more chicken fingers than this always hungry bear!

Meet Pacer in this video, and hear from his parents, Quinn and Mekell, about why they traveled all the way from Montana to Orange County to get Pacer the treatment he needed to ensure a bright future.

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Video: The Bill Holmes Tower Rocks!

Many cool things have happened at CHOC Children’s since it opened in 1964. And if you ask me, I think the opening of the Bill Holmes Tower this year is at the top of my list.

The seven-story tower tripled the size of CHOC’s former campus in Orange, and its opening added a host of new services to CHOC’s offerings. It’s vibrant and colorful, and I bet it would look beautiful from a tall treetop. Thank you, CHOC for building it!

Have you seen inside yet? Check out this video for a special tour from the people who know and love the tower most — CHOC kids.