a father talking to his son

Talking politics with your kids: Advice for parents

With election season here, it’s hard to miss the onslaught of media coverage and chatter about political issues and candidates. While this is an important time for our country, it can be overwhelming for parents wondering how to talk to kids about politics.

“Politics are front and center right now, making it a great time to talk to kids about the democratic process,” says Dr. Mery Taylor, a CHOC Children’s pediatric psychologist. “It’s not something that is abstract – we are all watching it unfold. Now that many kids are back in school, there is sure to be buzz about current events. It’s important for parents to get ahead of the information so they can be prepared.”

Starting a conversation with kids about politics

Dr. Taylor encourages parents to start with the basics. Here are some conversation starters she encourages parents to use:

  • What is a democracy?
  • What are the roles of people in elected office?
  • Why is this happening now?

Next, emphasize your personal responsibility as a citizen to vote, Dr. Taylor says.

“Talk to your kids about what it means to have elected officials that represent the diverse society we live in, and how that helps everybody,” she says. “Discuss the values that are important for your family. It is likely your children know who you will be voting for, but why?”

Parents can use a discussion on politics and the election as a way to model their critical thinking process for their children. To do that, Dr. Taylor encourages parents to talk about the values that shape their decision.

“Explain to your children the process of evaluating candidates’ policies and the impact of those policies on individuals, the environment and the American society as a whole,” Dr. Taylor says. “Children and adolescents are naturally curious creatures and you might be surprised by the questions that they will ask. You may find a conversation with your child or teen might even help you to articulate your own views more clearly.”

Parents can also tailor this conversation to their child’s personal interests, Dr. Taylor says.

“Focus on things that your child cares about. Are they passionate about saving turtles? Help them learn about candidates’ views on animal welfare. Do they want to be a business owner someday? Help them research candidates’ views on small business. Are they interested in health and science? Find out about the candidates’ policies on science and education funding,” Dr. Taylor says. “There are sure to be issues that speak to your child’s interest and help them feel connected to the election, and why politics matter as a whole.”

Share your plan to vote with your child. Take them along to the mailbox or polling station, depending on your voting plan.

How to deal with your child’s stress over the election

If you think your child is probably not affected by the election process, think again – this can be an overwhelming and stressful time for children and teens as well. Dr. Taylor offers the following tips for parents worried about how to talk to kids about politics:

  • Acknowledge your children’s feelings. Ask what they feel and why. Listen closely and try to connect with your child’s emotions before problem solving. If they have concerns or fears about a particular issue or how it may affect your family, reassure them that they are safe and that your family will work out any issue together.
  • Keep the conversation positive. Focus on the positive aspects of a candidate or an issue. Take this opportunity to explain to your kids how to voice their opinions with respect, even when he/she doesn’t agree with someone else. Talk about what you believe and why in a respectful way, too. For younger children, keep the conversation light. For teens, ask them what they’ve heard at school, and/or what they’re unclear about – their answers may surprise you.
  • Talk about the election process. Explain to them that everyone has a voice. While they may not be able to vote, encourage your kids to get involved at school or in the community with issues that are important to them, such as the environment or the economy, for example. Let them know their contributions can make a big difference.
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