CHOC Children's Blog

The Latest Guidelines for Introducing Solids to Babies

Many parents are familiar with this scene: It’s dinner time, and your baby is eyeing every bite of food you put in your mouth. Is it time for baby to try solid foods?

Solid foods can be introduced as early as six months of age, according to guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics and the World Health Organization. That’s when a baby’s digestive system is developmentally ready for food. Prior guidelines recommended starting solids at four months, but research has shown that introducing solid foods earlier could increase the chances of developing diabetes, obesity, allergies and eczema, according to Vanessa Chrisman, a pediatric dietitian at CHOC Children’s.

Age is not the only requirement for solid foods. A baby should also show the following signs of readiness: they can hold their head up, they can sit up without support, they can close their mouth around a spoon, and they no longer reflexively push things out of their mouth with their tongue.

“If a baby spits the food back out with her tongue every time a parent offers food, she’s probably not ready for solids yet,” says Chrisman.

At first, solid foods are more for practice and exposure to new flavors and textures, rather than for nutrition. A baby’s main source of nutrition will continue to be breast milk or formula up until one year of age. As a baby eats larger amounts of solid food and approaches the one year mark, they may begin to drink less breast milk or formula.

Solid foods are traditionally introduced in puree form. Single foods are blended to a smooth consistency and fed by spoon. As a baby eats larger volumes and tries more foods, parents can move on to a thicker texture: mashed foods. At around nine or 10 months old, a baby may start eating finger foods in small pieces.

Baby Led What?

Another method of introducing solid foods to babies is called baby-led weaning (BLW). This method has been popularized in the United Kingdom over the last decade and is starting to gain popularity in the United States.

“Baby-led weaning is a way of introducing solid foods beginning with whole but manageable pieces, and skipping purees and mashed foods,” Chrisman says.

Babies are offered foods that the rest of the family is eating, except for choking hazards such as whole grapes, hot dogs, raw carrots, popcorn, nuts, raisins and very tough meat. Parents can cook and spice the food as they normally would for themselves.

BLW teaches baby to feed themselves, helps them develop motor skills and gives them control over how much food they want and if they want it. “If they’re the ones deciding when to stop eating, it can help them regulate their appetite later,” Chrisman says.

A recent study by the AAP determined that babies are not at a higher risk of choking from BLW than they are with traditional purees. Regardless of the food method, it’s always a good idea for parents to know infant CPR, Chrisman says.

As with puree-fed babies, BLW babies must meet the same signs of developmental readiness before starting solid foods. One thing a baby doesn’t need, though, is teeth. “Babies have strong gums that can soften food, along with their saliva,” says Chrisman.

Chrisman recommends that parents choose the method that fits their baby’s personality. An independent baby may take to BLW more than a baby who prefers to be spoon-fed. The key to remember is that every baby is different: “What might work for your friend’s baby might not work for your baby,” Chrisman says.

Straight from a Pediatric Dietitian

Chrisman offers these expert tips to parents as they introduce baby to solid foods:

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